Skip to main content

Full text of "The chemist and druggist [electronic resource]"

See other formats


April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

RCPPLinilT 



OLDFIELD, PATTINSON ft CO. 



Concentrated Infusions 
Fluid Extracts. 

Concentrated Decoctions. 
Solid Extracts. 

Concentrated Liquors. 
Fruit Essences. 

Concentrated Essences. 
Inspissated Juices. 

Concentrated Waters. 
Soluble Essences. 




DRUGS IN 

ORIGIN/ L PACKAGES 

AS IMPORTED. 



SPECIAL TERMS 

TO 

LARGE BUYERS. 



Inquiries should slate quantities. 




Concentrated Extracts. 
Extract , of Herbs. 
Coated Pills. 

Composition Essence. 
Malt Extract. 

Vegetable Colours, & c. 



FBICE LIST WILL BE FOB WARDED ON BECEIPT OP BUSINESS CABD. 



MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT DRUGGISTS, 

IMPORTERS of ESSENTIAL, OLIVE, and COD LIVER OILS. 



SOLE PROPRIETORS AND MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

"SILVER CHURN" DAIRY PREPARATIONS. 



Butter Colouring. 


GLASS BOTTLES ■■ 6d.. 1/, 2/. 5/ Retail. 

4/, 8/, 16/, 38/ per dozen. 

BULK 1/ per lb. 100/ owt. in 2-gallon Bottles. 

90/ in 1-cwt. Kegs. 85/ in 3-cwt. Barrels. 


These Goods are selling 
well in the Agricultural dis- 
tricts. They are very at- 
tractively got up, are superior 
to any foreign makes, and 


Butter Powder 

and Preserver. 


4/, 8/, 16/. 38/ per dozen. 
BULK 1/ per lb. 84/ owt. in owt. Kegs. 


Essence of Rennet, 

For Junkets, Cards and Whey, 
Oheeie Cakes, <tc, &c. 


GLASS BOTTLES-. 6<i.. V. V. 5/ Retail. 

4/, 8/, 16/, 38/ per aozen. 


Liquid Annatto, 

or Cheese Colouring. 


STONE BOTTLES. 6<i., 1/, 2/, 5/ Retail. 

4/, 8/, 16/, 38/ per dozen. 

BULK 1/ per lb.. 10d. in 2-gallon Bottles. 

84/ in 12-gallons. 80/ in 3-cwt. casks. 


are well worth the attention 
of the Trade, as they leave 
a good margin to the seller. 


Cheese Rennet, 

01 

SPECIAL STRENGTH. 


STONE BOTTLES- • l-pints, 9d. Retail. 7/ doz. 

Pints, 1/3 „ 12/ „ 
Quarts, 2/ „ 20/ „ 
4-gall., 4/ „ 36/ „ 
1-gall., 8/ „ 72/ „ 

BULK. At Speoial Prioes. Inquiries should state 
quantity. 



Attractive Show Cards and Printed Matter may we had on application. 



17 TODD STREET, MANCHESTER. 



8 



u 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SVPPLKRIEMT 



April 18, 1891 



LEATH & ROSS, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT 

HOMEOPATHIC CHEMISTS 



9 ww m 9 

_A_JSTJD -A-T 5 ST. IPJLTTIG'S CHUECHYAED, IE. C. XjOHTlDOliT . 
Wholesale and Export Department— 9 VERE STREET, W. 

SPECIAL TIR-A-IDIE NOTICE 




SIZE. 



(On and after APRIL 2, 18 91.) 



OUR * 1 -4s. 



•a a 



_ 60 

be ra 
a " 
a> .., 

l-^ • 
f 

s ~ 

2 - 

§ g 
ft 



AGENTS' 

CONTENTS REALISE 



SHOW 

£9. 




PER DOZEN. 



CASE. 



0 +3 +* 05 • -J 

o « d 

^ a? a. 

1 2 OS'S 
.O two 

& ^ • s 

« £ ti a 

S « S != . 



ft « 



Many Hundreds of these Cases have been sent out. 
Show Card, Transparencies for the Window, Counter Bills, and 25 Books (for gratuitous distribution) 
on the Treatment of Common Complaints sent with this Case. 
OTHER AGENTS' CASES, £2 2s., £3 3s., £6 6s., £10 10s. and £21. 



WHOLESALE PRICE LIST OF MEDICINES PUT UP READY FOR SALE. 



Tinctures.— Sixpenny 
Shilling 
Camphor Solution ) Sixpenny 

RublDi ' 8 (shiEing 



per dozen. 



Pills 



Pilules. 



Sixpenny Bottles, 3/- 
Ninepenny „ 4/- 
Shilling „ 5/ 



per dozen. 



Bottles, 3/- 
5/- 
3/- 
5/- 

Subject to 25 per cent, discount for prompt cash monthly, making the Xet Cash Prices as under : — 

6d. BOTTLES. 9d. BOTTLES. Is. BOTTLES. 

2/3 per doz. 3/- per doz. 3'9 per doz. 

N.B.— Special quotations for large quantities and to Shippers. 
Upwards of 2,500 Chemists keep our Goods, and find them a profitable auxiliary to their other Bus ness. Send 
for Illustrated Price List, which gives useful "selections of Medicines to suit the varying requirenento of Chemitts. 

Free by Post on receipt of business card. 



4 



April IS, 1891 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST iii 

8UPPLENKIT 



VAN HARGAN'S 

KOLA WINE 

KOLA— A Remarkable Drug. 

Van Hargan's KOLA WINE is being brought prominently before the 
Medical Profession. Chemists will find the sale of this Wine a valuable 

addition to 

X> R O F X T S, 

KOLA WINE (Tail Hargan's) is Tonic, Stimulant, and Restorative. 

KOLA WINE (Van Hargan's) for Exhaustion, Fatigue, and 

Sleeplessness. 

KOIA WINE (Van Hargan's) assists Digestion, is Nourishing and 

luscle-hracing. 

KOLA VINE (Van Hargan's) improves the Appetite. 

KOLA WINE (Van Hargan's) is a pleasant and palatable form of 

administering Kola. 

Professor HECKEL says that KOLA "prevents rapid waste of tissue, and 

stimulates the muscles." 

INVALUABLE FOR INVALIDS TRAVELLING. 



KOLA WINE (Van Hargan's) is a restorative of the Digestive 

Organs. 

KOLA WINE (Van Hargan's) is a valuable Therapeutic Agent. 

WHOLESALE AGENTS— Messrs. Sanger & Sons, 480 Oxford Street; Messrs. Barclay & Sons, 
95 Farringdon Street; Messrs. Edwards, Lynch, Newdery, and all Wholesale Houses. 

IRIEJTJLir, AG-BITTS WA1TTED. 
FOR PARTICULARS AI'I'LY TO— 

J. VAN HARGAN'S OFFICE, 26 NEWMAN ST,, OXFORD ST,, LONDON. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



DRUGGISTS' CONFECTIONERY. 




ROBERT GIBSON & SONS, 

CARLTON WORKS, MANCHESTER, 

And No. 1 GLASSHOUSE YARD, ALDERSGATE ST., LONDON, 

Have now completed their EXTENSIVE ALTERATIONS, New Machinery and the 
most modern Appliances making their works the most complete of the 

kind in the Kingdom. 



GLYCERINE PASTILLES, 

One of their Specialities, but with the demand for which they hare hitherto been unable to cope. They will now be in a 
position to send out in any quantities, and buyers need no longer fear having half quantities sent. 

G-HBSOHSPS WORLD-REITOWITED 



Plant and Machinery equal to a producing power of 1 Ton per day. 




ALL KINDS IN ANF QUANTITIES. 



CHLORATE OF POTASH PELLETS 

IN 1-CWr. ORIGINAL BARRELS. BARRELS FREE. 



HIGH -CLASS LOZENGES 

OP EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

THROAT HOSPITAL LOZENGES, COUGH LOZENGES, 
VOICE LOZENGES, TOP-NOTE PRODUCERS, &c, &c. 

Indents from abroad, marked "GIBSON," may be sent to any Wholesale Drug or Shipping 

House in the Kingdom. 

IPrico Lints sent on application to 

ROBERT GIBSON & SONS, Carlton Works, MANCHESTER. 



6 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 





QUARTERLY 



AND 



BOOK OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

(CONTAINING NEARLY 5,000 ENGRAVINGS) 



OF 



SURGEONS' INSTRUMENTS 



AND 



DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 

MAY BE HAD ON APPLICATION ENCLOSING 
BUSINESS CARD. 



Forwarded Post Free to all parts of the World. 



NEW ISSUE, 1831. 

S. MAW, SON & THOMPSON, 7 to 12 ALDERSGATE STREET, LONDON, E.C. 



S. jviaw, Son & Thompson's 

OUARTERLY PRICE CURRENT 

A BOOK OF EEFEEENCE IN CONSTANT USE bY 

CHEMISTS & DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE . 

13 ISSUED 

cr^L^rTJ^.i^ir, april, j"cti_.y & October, 

AND IS FORWARDED, POST FREE, TO THE 

PRINCIPAL CHEMISTS & DRUGGISTS, WHOLESALE & RETAIL, 



IN ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD 

ALSO TO 



MERCHANTS, SHIPPERS, HOSPITALS, AND THE MEDICAL PROFESSION. 



ONE PAGE .. 
HALF PAGE.. 
QUARTER PAGE .. 
EIGHTH OF PAGE 
CARD SPACE 



SCALE OIF 1 CHARGES. 
Onk Inhrution. 

£11 0 0 

6 15 0 

.... 3 0 0 

1 13 0 

0 17 6 



Four DmitTIOTg. 
£40 0 0 Net. 
21 0 0 ,, 
11 0 0 ,, 
6 0 0,, 
3 4 0,, 



All Communications respecting Advertisements to be addressed to 

GEORGE BUTCHER, Advertisement Department, S. MAW, SON A THOMPSON, 

V to 12 ALDERSGATE STREET, EON DON", E.C. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST Avuu. 1R, 1891 



WRIGHT 



WHOLE SALE 



AND 



EXPORT DRUGGISTS 



AND 



MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 
(OFFICIAL AND NON-OFFICIAL) 

GRANULAR EFFERVESCING SALTS, 

BESOT SCAHIONT, P0D0PHY1LII, EUOEYMII, 

CITRATE IRON AND QUININE, 

Ammonio Citrate Iron, Pepsin, Expressed Juices. 



Umney's Fluid Extracts h m* nHH|H n HkV Esscntial 0il of Almonds 

of «K ■ 1 HHr fl[ V| Deprived of Prnssic Acid. 

Cascara (tasteless), Iff IUI IR R&l All preparations of British 

Cinchona, MM W ■■■■ 11 |U Pharmacopoeia, British 

Ergot, ; KM I VI &m mm Pharmacopoeia Addendum, 

Ipecacuanha, | M M M M J 9 J' fg Lfl and Britisn Pharmaceuti- 

Malt. HBHOl 01 ■■■■■■a cal Conference Formula. 



Semi-Solid] IYIALT EXTRACTS [Liquid. 

(Prepared in vacuo). 

WrfSr NOVELTIES IN PHARMACY AND THERAPEUTICS. 
NORWEGIAN GOD LIVER OIL A ETHER, CHLOROFORM, 

(Nbn-cengeal'mg at 32° Fa/rr.) 9* 

FINEST PALE. AT AND ALCOHOL 

SEASOrPl89I. %JU TN BOND. 

SAL VOLATILE, SPIRITS NITRE, TINCTURES, LINIMENTS, 

OF ENGLISH MANUFACTURE IN BOND. 

PRICES CURRENT ON APPLICATION, 



TELEGRAMS — 

a 



UMNEY LONDON." 

SOUTHWARK, LONDON. 



UMNEY. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

8IIPPLKIIE1IT 



ANTISEPTIC, AROMATIC, FLORAL, REFRESHING, PRESERVATIVE. 

It contains no salicylic mineral acids, or bleaching corrosive alkalies. Instead of soap, which turns the 
teeth yellow, it is made with the harmless Saponin (South American Soap Bark), whichlathers and cleanses 
beautifully. It is devoid of gritty matter commonly used to scour the teeth, and of acicular particles which 
cut and scratch while they whiten the enamel. It is also free from corrosives, injurious astringments, and 
irritating scents. 

The Chemist and Druggist says :— " The Dentifrice is a powder very agreeable to use, and containing 
' Saponin ' as its principal cleansing agent, and is guaranteed to be free from injurious chemicals." 

The British and Colonial Druggist says : — " The 1 Dentifrice ' is sent out in elegant glass-stoppered 
vases enclosed in very neat cases. It consists of a very delicately perfumed powder, entirely free from 
the least trace of grittiness or alkalinity. In the mouth the sensation of smoothness and coolness produced 
is most grateful." 

flutolw ^having Jfaam. 

CREAMY AND DEMULCENT. 

It is superfatted, and made with most demulcent materials. It is free from impure, rancid fats, and' 
cheap, inferior scents. A refreshing emollient, it does not irritate, but on the contrary so lubricates the 
skin and affects the hair that the razor glides over the face with the utmost facility, affording a " clean shave " 
without injuring the epithelium or producing pimples. 

The Cliemist and Druggist says : — " The ' Vinolia Shaving Foam ' is a superfatted substance of soft 
consistence, which lathers freely when applied to the beard, and by its emollient properties acts as a healing 
protective." 

The British and Colonial Druggist says : — " It is delicately perfumed. Applied to the skin previously 
moistened with water, it gives an abundant and permanent lather, and leaves the surface, after the process 
of shaving, perfectly cool and free from the least irritation. 

" Chemical tests, too, show it to be without the least trace of ' free alkali.' The ' Shaving Foam ' is 
one of the most pleasant preparations of the kind which it has ever fallen to our lot to use." 



VINOLIA DENTIFRICE, English, 2/6; American, 1/6. 
VINOLIA SHAVING FOAM.-/» collapsible tubes, 1/6. 

VINOLIA SOAP— Floral, 6d. ; Medical (Balsamic), 8d. ; ToiUi (Otto of Rose), IV.; and Vestal, 2/6 per Tablet. 
VINOLIA SHAVING .SOAP.— 1/-. 1/6, and 2/6 jfcr Slick; i iat-X-a'ces in porcelain- lined metal boxes, 2/-. 
VINOLIA CREAM — (For Itching, Eczema, Chaps, Chilblains, 4c) 1/9, 3/6, and 6/- each. 

VINOLIA POWDER.— (for the Toilet, Nursery, Skin Roughness, $c), in Pink, White, ind Cream, 1/9, 3/6, aiti 6/- 
per Box. . , . . 



BLONDEAU ET CIE., RYLAND ROAtt, LONDON, N.W. 

a 



viii 



THE 0FTRMT8T AND DRUGGIST 

SUW-Wt III 



Apiul 18, 1891 



Silver Medal, Paris, 1878. 



Philadelphia, 1876. 





TRADE 




Allen & Hanburys, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT DRUGGISTS, 

MANUFACTURING, PHARMACEUTICAL & ANALYTICAL CHEMISTS. 



Infants' Food 



Cod-Liver Oil ("Per- and oil 



SPECIAL MANUFACTURERS OF 
Bynol, Perfected Malt I SaccharinatedTabellee 1 Effervesciog Prepara- 



Jujubes and Pastilles tions 



fected ") 



Byno-Pancreatln Malt Extract 

Byno-H.\ pophosphites Malt Preparations 

Castor Oil (Tasteless) Byno-Pepsin Coca-Bynm 

Bynin, Liquid Malt Compressed TabeUee Lozenges 



Gelatine Coated Pills 

AND ALL 

Pharmaceutical Pre- 
parations. 




WOKKS : BETHNAL GKEEM. 



Price List of Drugs, Pharmaceutical Preparations, and Specialities on application. 

OFFICES : PLOUGH COURT, LOMBARD STREET, LONDON. 

Cod- Liver Oil Manufactories— i Depot for Australia— 

LONGVA AND] KJERSTAD, NORWAY. I 484 COLLINS STREET, MELBOURNE. 



JO 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
ivpninin 



ix 



Itolia 



11 



1/9, 3/6 and 6/- per Box. 
Floral, 6d. ; Balsamic, 8d. ; Toilet, lOd. ; and Vestal, 2/6 per Tablet. 

Ifalia flotmbr" 

1/9, 3/6 and 6/- per Box, in Pink, White, and Cream. 



llinofta tlentifrice." 



English, 2/6; American, 1/6. 

9f 



tyinolia Sharing oajr. 

1/-, 1/6 and 2/6 per Stick. Flat Cakes, in porcelain-lined metal boxes, 2/- 



Minolta Sharing #oam. 



In Collapsible Tubes, 1/6. 



BLONDEAU ET CIE., RYLAND ROAD, LONDON, N.W. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

ICPPUMHI 



April 18, 1891 



ESTA BLISHED 1842. 

T JEIJES BCKOOL. OF X 3 

Of the Pharmiceutio&l Society of Great Britain. 

Chemistry, Prof. Dtwstah, M.A., &c. Practical Chemistry, Prof. Attfield, F.R.S., &c. 

Botany Prof. Gbbkw, B.Sc, &c. Practical Pharmacy, Mr. Joskfh Iwcb, F.C.S., &c. Materia Medica, Mr. H. G. Gbkknish, F.L.8. 

FORTY-NINTH SESSION, 1890—91. 

AppHioMo* for admitsion to Ou School, for Protpectutet, or for further information or advice, may be made to the Dean, Piiof. AttFIELD, F.BS., or to 

— — •>•-•- »>• i*ctnr* R/wtn* or Laboratoriei. 17 Rloonuhurv Square, London, W.O. 



third Edition (flutirated), price 6i. Bd. 

MUTER'S SHORT MANUAL OF ANALYTICAL 
CHEMISTRY. "At onoe the oheapest and most complete labora- 
tory guide for pharmaceutical students, containing, within 200 pages 
everything they require to know, from the simplest testing te the most 
elaborate quantitative work." 

London : 8IMPKIN, MARSHALL & 00., Stationers' Hall Court, K.O. 




BEA'D FOR SAMPLES. 



High-class Artistic 

HANDBILLS 

SEWD FOR SAMPLES 
OF LABELS. 



BLAKE & MACKENZIE, 



ADeMcal Xabel & General prtntew, 

SCHOOL LANE, LIVERPOOL. 
We wulu ft speciality of MEDICAL LABEL PRINTING, and for Good Workmanship, 



But Designs, Punctuality, and Price, can compete successfully against any nous* U the Trade. 



Te Chessdsts whe comblns a SEED TRADE with their other business, w» cam supply them with every requisite suitable for that business, as we ex 

Th« Largest Maker* of SEED POCKETS In the) KINGDOM. 

IposUI attentiea is paid to Printing Seed Cata.los<uea, Samples or which will bo ready In November, and teat 

fro* on application. 

Aad we strongly recommend applying te as fat 

Samples before ordering elsewkere. 



OUR CHEMISTS' CALENDARS FOR 1891 ARE NOW READY, 



We truth* mil deecription* of FOWDKH and other JEXVMLOPB3, which are teeond te none for Quality and, JPrie«» 
CHEMISTS' STOCK LABELS. OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. KEPT IN STOCK. 

FORD, SHAPLAND & CO. 

CHEMISTS' AND GENERAL PRINTERS, LITHOGRAPHERS, ENGRAVERS, 4 c. 

6 GREAT TURNSTI LE, H IGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C. 

PICTORIAL COUNTER BILLS 

PRINTED ON ASSORTED TINTED PAPER. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES ANB PRICES. 



ORDINARY COUNTER BILLS, 

On GOOD WHITE PAPER, at LOWEST PRICES ever offered. 

CROWN OCTAVO BILLS (7* in. by 5 in.) 12/0 
DEMY OCTAVO BILLS (9 in. by 5* in.) XT/& 

All other Sizes at equally Low Rates. Specimens and Prices on application. 



IRTET 

FOR THE WATER CLOSET. In Registered Shape Boxes and in Packet?. Samples and Prices on Application. 

Price Lists, Pamphlets, Circulars, Billheads, Memorandums, Cards, and all kinds of Printing and Stationery required by 

Chemists at most Moderate Prices. 

AGENTS for REGISTRATION of TRftDE MARKS. 

12 



April 18, 1891 




LIBRARY 



v-aoio 




(Late M. JACKSON & CO.}, 

MANUFACTUKEKS 




1/- ku 4, 



0» 



l.-3<(. to 2 « 




SCIENTIFIC APPARATUS, 




rz 

( 



AND IMPORTERS OP 



3.-2A to 3/8 



AX80 



4.-2/8 S— 1/3 



Finest BOHEMIAS U HSij&JgJ 

and &ERMAI ^llllllliSl PURE 

GLASS AND PORCELAIN JBHulliiff 

CHEMICAL -""M^m^ CHEMICALS 

APPARATUS, /f|% ^oi Analysis, 

ORME'S PATENT ADVERTISING TABLETS 



11.-14/8 



BY APPOINTMENT TO 

The Science and Art Department and Government Schools at South 
Kensington; the Crown Agents for the Colonies; the 
Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, do. 




1!.— 4/6 to 26/- 



8.-2/8. 




APPARATUS SECURELY PACKED FOR THE 
COLONIES AND FOREIGN PARTS. 




T— Sol. to 4/- 




PRICE LIST OF CHEMICAL APPARATUS, 

Containing 1,500 Illustrations, price 6d. 
Complete Catalogue of Scientific Apparatus, over 2,000 
Illustrations, price 2/6. 

(To the Trade, post free Is.) 



H.-JH 167- 



•.— a* 4/- 



J. ORME & CO., 

65 BARBICAN, LONDON. 




H_«1 1/- 



13 



xii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

8VPPLKWEHT 



April 18, 1891 



it 



ESTABLISH! D 

j 

1 1852. 



JRADE 



OPTIMUS 



Catalog m 

POST 
FREE. 








OPTIMUS" RAPID EURYSCOPE. 



5x4 
63a. 



5x4 
63i 



17x51 


8x5 


9x7 


1 10 x 8 1 


1 9)4. 6d. | 


110s. 


125s. 


1 22Cg. 1 



12 x 10 
380s. 



OPTIMUS" WIDE ANCLE EURYSCOPE. 



7x5 
S4s. 6d. 



9x7 
126s. 



10 x 8 
220s. 



12 x 10 
380j. 



4}x3i 
120s. 



4}x3l 
130s. 



OPTIMUS" RAPID RECTILINEAR. 



33s. 45.'. 49s. s 6d. 



64a 



82s. '6d. 127s. 6d. 142s? 6d. 180s. Ox. 



4}x3i 

85' 



3Js. 



OPTIMUS" WIDE ANCLE SYMMETRICAL. 



6ix4| 
9%. 

" OPTIMUS " 



RAYMENT'S CAMERA (Long Focus). 
Price includes 3 Double Dark Slides 
6ix4J | 81x6* I 10x8 I 12x10 
145.. | l68i. I 212s. | 258s. 
" OPTIMUS " CAMERA (Long Foous). 

Prioe includes 3 Double Dark Slides. 
6Jx4J I 8ix6J I 10x8 I 12x10 
137s. I 175s. I 227s. I 275s. 

PORTABLE A.R. CAMERA. 

Compact, Rigid, and of Excellent Finish. 



15x12 
314s. 



15x12 
33 Js. 



52s. 6d. 82s'. 6d. 127s" 6d 



leVs. 



5x4 
146s. 



6ix4J 
165' 



it 



OPTIMUS" MAGAZINE CAMERA 

Pictures 4J by 3J incites. 



Carries twelve 
dry plates, no 
daik slides. 

Plates changed 
by turning a 
button. 




The most 



142s. 6J. 18\ T a. 225s 

"'OPTIMUS RAPID EURYSCOPE.' 
With its full aperture of 1J tn. (its equiv- 
alent focus being 11 in.), defines v>ith 
EXTREME BRILLIANOr, and when 
used with a stop it easily covers a 10 by 8 
plate to the oorners, which is larger than 
convenient yet t.hat engraved on the mount asitspos-i- 
inventeo. bility. Working as it does with such a 
Price with LARGE APERTURE (f/6 appro*.), it 
rapid serves as a portrait and group Lens, as 
eurytcope lens we j[ M a landscape and copying objective, 
and shutter, There is no doubt of its proving a most 
£7 7 0 USEFUL LENS." J. Traill Taylob, 
British Journal of 1'hotograpy. 



8Ax6i 10x8 I 12x10 I 1^x12 
125 1. I 150s. I 200'. | 26CU. 
WIDE ANCLE CAMERA (Long Focus). 
Price includes 3 Dark Slides. 
I 8^x64 1 10x8 I 12x10 I lSvlZ 
188s." 235s. | 288s. 350s. 



"OPTIMUS" PHOTOGRAPHIC SETS 




PERKEN, SON & RAYMENT, 



99 HATTON 
GARDEN, 



With tripod and every 
necessary, complete. 

For Plates— 

4J by 31, £3 8 0 
6i by 4J, £5 15 O 
8J by 6J, £9 10 O 



LONDON. 



TO PHOTOGRAPHIC DEALERS 

6E0RGE HOUGHTON & SON, 89 HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C. 

SUPPLY THEIR OWN AND ALL OTHER MAKERS' SPECIALITIES, AND 

ALL PHOTOGRAPHIC REQUISITES. 

On Best Terms, with Promptness and Dispatch. 

COMPLETE PRICE LIST &, TERMS FREE ON APPLICATION. 



LONDON HOMCEOPATHIO HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL 
SCHOOL, GREAT ORMOND STREET, BLOOMSBURT, W.O. 
Pr*M<dcnt—Ta* Loan EBUHT. Chairman— Majob Wh. VadghaU Mo boas. 

Contains 90 Bids, and being entirely supported by Voluntary Contributions, Dona- 
tions and Am ual Subscriptions are earnestly solicited. The Hospital is always 
span to the in. pection of visitors, and Clinical Instruction Is given in the Wards 
and Out-patit nt Department to Medical Students and Practitioners. It possesses > 
valuable Library of Homoeopathic Publications, which Medical Men are invited to 
study. Theyr re also invited to visit the Dispensary. The In-patients number 
evar 700 annually i the Out-patients nearly 9,000 annually. The number ol 
Patient* treated since the inauguration In 1849 exceeds J14.0O0. It has a staff o) 
41 Varan for Ward Nursing and Nursing Invalids at their residences. 
n. A. CROHH SnrTntarv-Htmr*lHn>ilt»l 

Now Beady, Second Edition, Crown 8vo., Pai;K 6s., 
A PRACTICAL MANUAL OP 

VENEREAL & GENERATIVE DISEASES: 

Inoludlng SPERMATORRHOEA, PROSTATOBBHOJA, IMPOTENCE, 
and STERILITY In Both Scxee. 

By M. K. HARGREAVES, TVI.r>. 

Assistant Physician to St. John's Hospital for Diseases of the Skin. 
LONDON : B. KLHPTON, 126 WABDOUB BTBKET, LONDON, W.C. 

14 



J. RAPHAEL & CO., 

CHEAPEST HOUSE IN THE TRADE FOB 

SPECTACLES, FOLDERS, FIELD, OPERA, AND 
MARINE GLASSES. 




Repairs and Post Orders Despatched Same Day. 

13 OXFORD STREET, LONDON, W. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRTJGGISTC 



xiil 



NOTICE ! ! 

March 1st, 1891. 
On and after the above date, CAFFYN'S LIQUOR 
CARNIS will be sent out flavoured with Celery. 

THE LIQUOR CARNIS CO., LIM. 



THE LANCET, 

a 3ournal of JSrftisb & ^foreign dfce&tdne, Surgerg, ©bstetrics, ptbgstologB, 
Chemistry Ipbarmacologg, public Ibealtb, ano mews. 



LONDON, 



SATURDAY. 



a P KIL 4th, 1891. 



THE LANCET, April 4th, 1891, says :— 

" We have already had occasion to examine this excellent 
" preparation. Liquor Camis is cow flavoured with a 'dash ' 
" of celery which gives it a very pleasant taste. That this in 
" no way interferes with the admirable condition in which 
•"the meat juice is preserved in the Cold is evident from the 
" fact that the simple experiment of boiling resulted in the 
" coagulation of the fluid." 



THE LANCET, July 12th, 1890, says .— 
" This is evidently a meat extract prepared in the cold 
"and preserved by glyoerine. It is extremely rich in 
" nitrogen, and the ash contains phosphates in considerable 
" quantity. So well are the soluble albuminoids of the meat 
"preserved that the fluid when heated turns into a semi- 
" tolid jelly. It is a really valuable nutrient." 




BY ROYAL LETTERS 
PATENT, 



Name of Journal 
(COUPON) 
POSTAL TRANSMISSION. 



We earnestly wish every Chemist to have a free sample 
of Caffyn's Liquor Carnis in its improved form and Pre- 
parations, as also some of our literature. We also place 
our Sample Department at the command of Chemists ia business who 
are desirous of presenting specimens of Caffyn's Liquor Carnis and 
Preparations to Medical Men practising (enclose separate list, showing 
name, speciality, and full postal address of each) in their immediate 
vicinity. 



Full Postal Address. 



Date of Dispatch 



llccc'ived here on 



Charges arc all paid by its. £ s. 



jwsonal 'use 

Please send at once some Caffyn's Liquor Carnis and Preparations for ^ me d£>ai friends 



{iiulicate which), Free and Carriatje Paid as per above announcement. 

Signature ' 



(lAst herewith) 



To the LIQUOR CARNIS CO., Lim., 

50 Rolborn Viaduct, London, E.C. 



Qualification 



N.B.-THI8 FORM REACHING US PROPERLY FILLED UP WILL BE DEALT WITH ASKA CABLECRAM. 



16 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST' 
icppiinin 



April IS, 1891 



EXCH AN G F COLU M N. 

Thb Section of "The Chemist and Druggist" must be closed for press by Thursday noon of each week. 

Remittances payable to EDWARD HALSE. 

TERMS. 

Advertisement! In this department mnit be paid for in advanoe. From this rule no deviation oao be made. Iaeertleni are ohargaa at the rate 

if Id per word, provided the advertiser attaches his name and address, for eaoh word of which he must also pay at the same rate ; or If he Days Id. per 
*«rd his aame and address will be registered and a figure attached to hia advertisement. All oorrespendenoe referring te that figure must be addressed 
to " The Publisher of Thb Chemist and Dbdqqist, 42 Gannon Street, E.G.," and the figure must be dUtlnoUy eadorsed upon the envelope. Letter* 
will thaa be forwarded to their proper destination. A prioe is counted as one word, as e.g., £1 lOi. 6d. 

DEPOSIT OF MONEY. — In order to ensure safety we offer the following syBtem : — The purchaser of anything advertised in the Exohang» 
Coluruu may remit the amount to us, accompanied by a commission of 6d. if the amount is £3 or under ; and It. if over that sum. We acknowledge 
receipt of deposit to both parties, and hold the money until we are satisfied that either the goods are returned to their original owner or the purchase 
as eempleted. 

Postal orders and oheques sent as deposit must be made payable to Edward Halse, and crossed " Martin's Bank (Limited)." 



FOB DISPOSAL. 

Formulae. 

Reliable recipes, 6d. each ; full set of 130 neatly 
copied in book, Is. 6d. ; send for list. 
" Chemist," Edwards, Wye, Kent. 

Mixture for Tio and Toothache, Indigestion 
Specific, 2*. 6d. each recipe. W. Arthur, 
99 Old Road, Blackley, Manchester. 

B^liabla recipes, as 6old over 10 years, warranted 
practicable and pay well ; lists free. Tom 
Brooks, Chemist, Hornsey, London, N. 

Educational. 

Allen's "Commercial Organic Analysis," 2nd 
volume (Fixed Oils, Ac), published by 
Churchill. 171/20. 

Materia Medica cabinet, 184 specimens, maho- 
gany case by Evans, cost three guineas, 
price thirty shillings. "Phenacetin," 140 
London Road, Nottingham. 

Bentley's " Botany," 7t. ; Ganot's " Phllof ophy," 
4». ; Ganot's " Physics," 7i. ; Martindale's 
"Pharmacopoeia" (1885). 2*. 6d. ; Pereira's 
"Materia Medica" (3 Tola.), 12*. Bd. "Vin- 
cent, 69 Trigon Boad, S.W. 

Proprietary Articles. 

Dobson's black leg drinks ; 6 at 5». 6rf ., 12 at 3s. ; 
offers wanted. ForBter, Dover, 
gross 6d perfumes, boxed, 2s. id. doz., assorted ; 
clean ; sample 4 stamps. 169/31. 

Stook of patents ; sheep-dips, Including Little's, 
Cooper's, McDongal ; clean condition. Par- 
ticulars, W. Bedford, Clifton, York. 

Drug! Mid Cbemi**li 

Genuine English oil of lavender. 1890, grown on 
Mr. Sawer's lavender farm, 3*. per ounce. 
Marshall Leigh, Brighton. 

4 2s. 9d. herbal pills, 5*. 3<f . ; 2 doz. li. lid. 
Pritchard's powders, 17*. ; 2s. 9d. Cooper's 
vital restorative, li. 9d. ; 2 1*. ljd. Vicker's 
anti lactic, 1*. bd. ; 2 1*. ljd. Hammond's 
P. paint, li. 4<i. ; 1 each neuraline and 
glykaline, 1*. 4d. ; 9 1j. \\d. Burgess' Lion 
ointment, 6s. ; 9 li. 1 W. Lion pills, 6). ; 
clean ; post free ; cash with order ; 59 lbs. 
potass, chlor., at 6d. on rail, cash. 22/17. 



Cit. magnesia, 68.t. per owt. ; carriage paid on 
1 cwt. lots. Parker & Co., South Wlgston. 

Gentian root, 2 bales uncut, 1 bale cut ; caraway 
seeds, 15 bags, 1890 crop ; Dutch sublime 
olive oil, 19 caier, pyramid flasks; prices on 
application. E. M. Briscoe <fc Co., produce 
brokers, African Chambers, Liverpool. 

Bhcp rutin*!. 

120 drawers, 14 ft. ; ebonised wall-cases, 13 by 9 ; 
dispensing-screen ; cheap. Hugh Edgson, 
Nottingham. 
Chemist's mahogany No. 71 drawers, lowest 
price 61. ; also strong 14-drawer deal coun- 
ter, 12. K*. James Douglas, 99 East Street, 
Southampton. 
Three second-hand Spanish mahogany plate- 
glass show cases, each 5 ft. high, 5 ft. wide, 
perfectly dust-tight, sliding shelves. Brom- 
head Bros., Chemists' shop-fitters, Bangor 
Street, Nottingham. 
New.— 8 specie-jars, 141 in. high, with glass 
covers, is. 3d. each ; 4 speoie-jars, 13 in. 
high, with gilt-metal covers, 3s. eaoh ; 
l-quart-tincture-press. It. ; 1 1-galL, tincture- 
pri b>, 25j. ; 11-in. marble mortar and pestle, 
8i. ; soda-water stand, marble top, 24 x 20 in., 
mahogany pillar and base, 21. 5s. ; nests of 
drawers; stoppered rounds. W. Hawke & 
Son, Shop Fitters, Wild Court, Great Wild 
Street, London, W.O. 
Shop fittings, second-hand, very cheap.— 12 ft. 
run of drawers, with glass labels and glass 
knobs, shelving and lockers complete, price 
152 ; glass-fronted counter, 12 ft. long, 10 
guineas ; dispensing screen, 6 ft. long, price 
6/. 10j. ; shop-rounds, about 300 at 7s.6d. per 
doz. ; four carboys on mahogany stands, 
3/. IOi. ; pair very handsome specie-jars, 2 ft. 
high, 70*. ; bent glass counter cases, 6 ft. 
long, as Maw's Al8, price 52. IOi. Philip 
Josephs, 54 Old Street, Goswell Road, Lon- 
don, E.G. 

M'arellaneoni. 

A large number best composition mortars or 
pestles, half price; on approval. Insull, 
Hanley. 

Lamp and bracket, 22- inch globe, 2 ruby lenses, 
very handsome, price 32. 3i. 19 Moseley 
Road, Birmingham. 

A Berri's printing-press, with chase 13x8 in., 
6-inch ink-roller, and 2J lbs. L.P. type 
(clarendon), 30i. Tennall.Cranleigh, Surrey. 



What offers in cash for 6 dozen Stciner's touch- 
stone, the only test for spurious gold and 
silver? retail 2s. per case. T„ 25 Mint 
Street, Lincoln. 

Wrought : standard, with arms for carboys, 
weighing over 1 cwt., 20<. ; pair specie-jars, 
with covers, 24 in., require repainting, 20i. ; 
8-inch marbled china letters for chemist 
and druggist, 20i. ; last seven years' Phar- 
maceutical Journal ; last year'B Chemist and. 
Druggist ; offers. Hartley, Leek. 



WANTED. 

Oliver's " Botany," lowest price. 169/30. 

A good second-hand aerated-water machine;. 

with accessories. Kendall, Blyth. 
Complete set glass recess labelled bottles and' 

pink dome jars. Thomas, Chemist, Boston . 
First-class recipes for making liquid annatto- 

and butter colouring ; Btate full particulars., 

159/29. 

Suppository-mould for 12 ; also pessary-mould 
for 6 ; good condition. Parker, Chemist, 
Scarborough. 

Gilt mortar ; two J-plate dark slides for instan- 
tograph ; good field-glass ; dispensing scales. 
Cairnie, Thurso. 

Dallmeyer's, Ross's, or any good J-plate camera- 
and lens, with tripod. "Dispenser," In- 
firmary, Hereford. 

1 or 2 pear-shaped carboys, 6 gallon, full height 
30 inches ; state lowest price. H. Dj 
Alexander, Chemist, Edinburgh. 

8-day movement, striker, for grandfather's long; 
clock, in or out of order or with case, cheap- 
Particulars to B., 75 Johnston Street, 
Blackburn. 

Three swan-necked carboys, glass shelving for 
window, caso for perfumery, dental vulca- 
niser, engine and appliances. Address, with, 
particulars, Sugden, 38 High Street, Notting 
Hill. 

Wills's "Elementary Materia Medica," Wills's- 
«' Elements of Pharmacy," Attfleld's " Che- 
mistry," Bentley's " Structural Botany " ; 
latest editions. Prioe, &o., to Denton, 
Hemsworth, Wakefield. 

Stamps. — Two old-English penny black stamps 
(1840 issue), with v.r. in upper corners-; 
advertiser offers 12. li; eaoh if the stamps 
are in good condition, but they must he 
sent ou approbation to Mr. Thomas H. 
Keer, Pharmaceutical Chemist, 9 Bruton 
Street, Berkeley Square, W. 



THE AMERICAN AND CANADIAN ISSUE 

Of "The Chemist and Druggist" will be 
published on May 31st, 1891. 

Further particulars of the Publisher, 42 Cannon Street, London, E.CX 

10 



A¥ril 18 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

ll'PPLRm KiT 



THOMAS TYRER & CO. S 

SPIRITUS ETHERIS NITROSI. 

GUARANTEED. P.B. 1885. 

ETHER. NITROS. SOL. 

1 to 3. 1 to 7. 

SPIRITUS AMMON. COMP. 

GUARANTEED. P.B. 1885. 

ETHERS. ESSENCES. FLAVOURS. 

Telephone No. 5415. Telegrams, " TYRER, STRATFORD, LONDON." 

Manufacturing Chemists, 
STIRLING CHEMICAL WORKS 

(ESTABLISHED BY DUNN Sc CO. 1844), 

STRATFORD, LONDON, E. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

PURE, PHARMACEUTICAL, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC, 

GENERAL & TECHNICAL CHEMICALS. 

Prepared under the direction of THOMAS TYRER, F.I.C., F.C.S., &c. 



17 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

IIPPLIHHT 



Apbil 18, 1891 



JOHN HOLROTD & CO., LIM. 

MANCHESTER, 

Sole Licensees for Manufacture and Sale of McFerran's Improved Automatic Machinery for Making- 
COMPRESSED TABLETS 

Of various shapes and sizes, from y gr. upwards. 
EXPERTS SENT TO FIX AND START MACHINES. Write for particulars and Prices. 
CAPSULES FOB 3VCOXJI_.lD 3VH AZKIUnTG-. 




AS SUPPLIED TO ALL THE LEADING FIFtlVIS 



18 



08^^ <Sce oj>}'o«ite page. 



April 18, 1891 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



»JTI*I»LEiTI BUT 




JOHN HOLROYD & CO., LIM. 




&-c opposite page. "TB^ 



xviii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



JOHN SANGER & SONS 

Patent Medicine Yendors, 



DEALERS IN 



DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, 




Mineral Waters, Perfumery 

And TOILET REQUISITES. 



As the SPRING SEASON ia fast approaching, the attention of the Trade is called to our well-assorted* 

Stock of 



FLESH GLOVES ( 



TURCO from 1/11 dozen, less 10 per cent, an 
5 per cent, cash for not less than 6 dozen. 



SMELLING AND TOILET BOTTLES 

Of the latter we have an immense variety of patterns, and a visit to Showroom will well repay intending purchasers. 

OUR N'E'VW CATALOGUE will be ready at an early date. Sent post free upon 

receipt of business card. 

Warehouse & Showroom : 489 OXFORD STREET, LONDON, W. 

NEW PATENT 

AIR-TIGHT CHEMIST JAR. 

A slight turn of the knob presses the indiarubber Band against the 
glass, and renders the vessel absolutely air-tight. The Stopper is 

made of pure Nickel, of handsome shape. 
INVALUABLE FOR SHOW BOTTLES, CHEMISTS, CONFECTIONERS, Ac. 
Samples and Prices of a// Chemists' Sundriesmen. 





Section of the Nickel 

37 CRUTCHED FRIARS, MARK LANE, E.C. stopper when deed 




© BEYER FRERES, 

^» 1fi to. 18 RUE DE LORRAINE 



16 & 18 RUE DE LORRAINE, 



NEW AGITATING 



MACHINE 



For 



These machines Arc made (or 10 or 



macerating and ex- 
hausting raw materials 
in infusion with alcohol, 
producing 150,000 move- 
menu per day to each 
metal receptacle, with a 
minimum of force. A coubiderablc economy of time, labour, and 
capital is obtained in infusing musk, amber, benjamin, civitte, 
iris, grains, powders, or pbarmai-cutlcal produots treated with 
liquids or ether. 
15 bottles, each containing about 15 litres, as required. 




Mortar Mill, I1axi> Towkb. 



20 



Apuil 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

• VPPI.MHHT 



WOOD WOOL, 

Or Wood-flbre Packing. 




This is used extensively for packing pur- 
poses in place of straw, ic. We use it 
largely, and cau recommend it. In bales of 
1 owt., 6/ per owt. 



OVAL "UNBREAKABLE." 




Light, strong, durable. Nn hoops to drop 
or rust off. Measurement 16 ins. Enamelled 
white inside, marbled outside. No House 
complete without them. 
Price 21/ per dozen. 



CARD & CO.'S GOODS. 




Plate Cloths (3 in a box) . . . . 7/6 per doz. 

Brass and Steel , 7/6 „ 

Jewel 3/6 „ 

All Drug Houses will supply. 



GLUE 



Upwards of 100 tons always in stock. 

If yon desire to match a Glue or Gelatine 
send small sample and ask price. 



BROOKE'S SOAP. 




FREU LONUOS OR BRISTOL. 

If difficulty in obtaining in any part of the 
world write — 
Sole London Conttf/neei : — 

" Fordhamt London." 
100 Bar Cnses .. .. for 25/ 

60 15/ 

48 Fid f- bar Boxes .. „ 6/3 



o 
*-> 

d 

no 
Eh 
3 
Oh 

P 

ai 
13 

« 

w 
a 

■z 
•< 



GEORGE CHEAVIN'S 

World-renowned Patent Removable Plato 

~ RAPID WATER FILTER. 

S3k 




FILTERS for the Dining-room, the Hall or Conierva- 
tory, the Kitchen nnd Scullery, and the Bedroom ; for 
Travellers and Emigrants, Ships' Cabins, Yachts and 
Steamers ; for Brewers, Distillers, Soda-water Manu- 
facturers, Hospitals, Public Institutions, Schools, 
Mansions, and wherever Pure Water is requited. 




CHEAVIN'S FILTER affords a certain protection 
against the dangers that lnrk in the domcstio water 
supply. Guaranteed to remove all germs of Cholera, 
Typhoid, Diphthoria, and all oausca of Blood 
Poisoning, <fcc. 



PRICE LIST. 

Nob. .. A B O D E F G H I J 
Price . . 11/6 15/ 18/6 26/ 26/6 43/6 52/ 72/ 93/6 123/ 
Gallons $ H ?\ 3A 6 6 7 12 19 27 
Discount and further particular- upon anplloation. 



►a 
w 

Hi 
w 
>— i 

m 

o 

i— i 
O 



LEMON SQUEEZERS. 




A saving of 25 per cent, over every 

other process. 
Do not be deceived : every Genuine 
Squeezer bears EASLEY'S name and 

oat; of patent. 
All Drug Houses will fupply at 2/ per 
dozen, in subdivided boxes. 




1/3 size .. ..9/ per doz. 

If 12 cloz 8/9 „ 

If5eross .. ..8/6 „ 
Tinlets .. ..3/6 „ 
BathEnamel,l/6size,ll/ „ 
5 per cent, for Cash. 




This is the Best of all. Put np in 1/ 
Stone Bottles. 




A PRETTY. ORNAMENT FOR THE 
HOUSE. 

Will Kill all the Flies you have. Prioo 
4/6 per dozen. 



J>6 to 40 YOKE ROAD, 
KING'S CROSS, 

TELEGRAMS-" FORDHAMS LONDON." TELEPHONE 1514. ESTABLISHED 1895. 



W. B. FORDHAM & SONS, UM., 



LONDON, N. 



21 



THE CHEMIST A_ND DRUGGIST 
ivppliuhi 



April 18, 1891 




SODA WATER MAKING 



WITH 

LIQUEFIED CARBONIC ACID GAS. 

The No. 1 "Compact" Machine as 

shown) is specially designed for Chemists and Hospitals, and 
caa be used for either Syphons or Ball-stoppered Bottles 

Producing capacity, by hand power, 60 dozens per boor. 

Ditto, for steam power, 120 dozens per hour, with extra 
filling machine. 

PRICS £55. 

The No. 2 "Compact" Machine, n 

on the same principle, but smaller in its capacity. 

Producing capacity, by hand, 25 dozens per hour. 

Ditto, for steam, 60 dozens per hour, with extra filling 
machine. 

PRICE £38. 



Iron Vessel containing an aver- 
age of 281bs. by weight of 
Liquefied Gas 



10 s. 

each. 



And has sufficient Gas to manufacture about 20 gross Soda 
Water (10 oz. Bottles), or from 3,000 to 4,000 draughts from 
the Counter Fountain. 

A Charge of £3 is made for the Iron Vessel, but 
when returned, the full amount is credited. 



Send for Catalogue " C," giving complete information. 
Forwarded free upon application to 

BARNETT & FOSTER, 

" Niagara "Works," 
23 Eagle Wharf Road, LONDON, N. 



GOLD MEDAL, Amsterdam, 1883. DIPLOMA OF HONOUR, Paris, 1887 

gueretTreres, 

MACHINISTS, PATENTEES, 

PARIS-72 B OULEVARD DE LA GARE , 72— PARIS. 

SYPHONS WITH SHORT LEVER, with Metal Tops of Pure Tin, carefully 

mounted, and the glass of the first quality. 
GAZOSELTZ, for the instantaneous production of Aerated Beverages at table. 

Anyone can use them. 
" CONTINUOUS PROCESS " Apparatus complete, guaranteed without flaw in 
construction, possessing perfect action, and tested to a high pressure, while 
fulfilling every desirable condition of sanitation and economy. 
Ou GENERAL catalogue and price list will be sent free on application 





WIESBADEN KOCHBRUNNEN SALT 



FOR THE EFFECTIVE TREATMENT OF 



Disorders of the Organs of Respiration and Digestion, 
Catarrh of Larynx and Stomach, the Enlargement of Liver and Spleen, 

Abdominal Plethora, &c. 

TO IB IE OBT_A.HSr.ED THIR-OTTO-EC -A.I_.Ij WIEIOLIES-A.I.-E HOTJSES. 



SOLE AGENT3— 



[21 



W. SCHACHT & CO., 26 Finsbury Pavement, LONDON, E.C. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
»i ri-n iit vi 



A. LOZE ft CO., LD., 



281 WEST DERBY ROAD, 

LIVERPOOL. 




IIETIDISDPIEICNrS.A.IBIjIEJ TO CHEMISTS; 

THE ONLY PRACTICAL SODA WATER MACHINE. 

Self-working by Chemical Action. Ho Skilled Labour. 

NOT LIABLE TO GET OUT OP ORDEB OB NEED BEPAIBS. 

Produces the Purest Aerated Water made. 

Machines, in two sizes, at 25 guineas and SO guineas. All 
complete. With the smaller a lad can make easily in ten hours 
twenty dozen Syphons or 100 dozen Bottles; with the larger, thirty 
dozen Syphons or 175 dozen bottles. 



INDIA.— Machines on view ax Messrs. Bertie-Smith & Co.'s, Bombay. 

County Laboratory, 30 Bbownlow Street, Liverpool, October, 1889. 
I have examined daring the pre»ent year the Machines for making Aerated Waters invented by Mr. Loze, and I have formed a very high opnlil 
of them. No lead is found In any part whioh oemosin contact with the water, and the procesB is one whioh produces absolutely, pnre Carbonic Gai, 
Accordingly I find that the effervesoing water produced is free frem every injurious metal or oontamination, and has a tetter flavour than that produce* 
in the ordinary way. j. CAMPBELL BROWN, D.Sc. 

Chemical Labobatory, 80 Albert Gate, Manchebteb, Elst August, 1889. 
Bbstlemen, — At your request I have visited the works of Messrs. A. Loze & Co., of Prescot Street and Tuebrook, Liverpool. I have inspected 
his patented Apparatus fer producing Aerated Waters, and have analysed the Aerated drinks manufactured. The results of analysis quite 
justified the Inferences whioh were drawn from a knowledge of the materials UBed. Thus, instead ef using ordinary whiting (as the souree 
of carbonic aoid gas), which gives off small quantities of offensive gases when acted upon with acid, Mr. Loze uses ene of the pure soluble bioarbenates 
of either Potash or Soda ; the use of this salt enables the apparatus to be much simplified in form, as no gas washer is required, but the carbenio Mid 
iu may be led at once into the liquid in the Saturating Cylinders. The Aerated drinks produced are of very high quality, both as to purity and ai 
li Aeration, and the apparatus possesses the merit of extreme simplicity and efficiency.— Faithfully yours, 0. ESTCOURT, F.I.U., F.I. 

Messrs. A, Loze, A Co., Limited. Dittos, 10th April, 1890. 

Dear Mr. Loze, — I am pleased to Inform yeu that I have been able to werk the Machine sold to me by you without previous knowledge. 
With yenr patent Turnover I can bottle Patent Stoppers at the rate of two dozen per minute. Syphons and Corked Bottles I oan fill much quiokor thai 
wkat yen advertise the Machine to do. 

The Aerated Waters produced have been sampled by a number of gentlemen, and pronounced by them to be of a mest excellent quality.— Wlshiif 
you every success, I remain, yours truly. BOBT. J. GOW, F.O.8. 

Non-Metallic ! Non-Poisonous ! ! Pnre Water 1 ! ! 




IMPORTANT INVENTION IN SYPHONS. 

NEW PATENT GLASS-LINED (THROUGHOUT) 

SYPHON HEAD 

PATENTED FOR ENGLAND AND ABROAD. 
Absolutely ensuring no metallic contamination or poisoning of the drinks. 



THIS PATENT GLASS-LINED SYPHON possesses the following advantages over others :— 

Perfect purity of Waters. Glass Lining throughout, so is always quite clean. 

Valve working on glass and in a glass tube prevents any drip from tap. Fresr and fuller flow from tap. 
Stronger in every part, as exterior of Syphon Head is of metal, and in appearance like ordinary Syphcns, 
and stand wear and tear three times as long. 
IPRICES ONLY SLIGHTLY HIGHER FOR ALL THESE IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENTS. 
Tested before being sent out to bear a pressure of 260 lbs. to the square inch. 
Chemists should insist on having Aerated Waters in only Glass-lined Syphons, and so prevent any poisoning by mtallic 
contamination. It is impossible to lay too mnch stress vpon tlie importance of this matter. 
Patent Glass-Lined Syphon Head put to ordinary j hons for 20*. per dozen. 
Sample Syphon sent carriage paid on receipt of 2s. 6d. Seltsogenej from Is. 9rf. each, 3-plnt size. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PATENTEES— 

THE GLASS LINED SYPHON COMPANY, LIBL EES 

NETHERTON ROAD, WOODBERRY TOWN, LONDON, N. 



(NICOI/E'S 

I). 



as 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 




JEWSBURY & BROWN'S, MANCHESTER, 

AERATED WATERS & EE VERGES, 

SPECIALLY PREPARED FOR A FIRST-CLASS FAMILY TRADE. 



Chemists who have not hitherto sold these Waters are solicited to 

apply for Prices and Terms. 



TRADE LISTS, SAMPLE COUNTER BILLS, AND ANALYTICAL REPORTS, 

WILL BE SENT ON APPLICATION. 

JEWSBURY & BROWN Pay Carriage on Waters and Returned 
Empties within 100 miles of Manchester. 

PI HI CD 111 NATURAL MINERAL 
UAAIllJDAlJ WATERS & SALTS. 

Are imported in bottles, and used in the treatment of CHRONIC GASTRIC CATARRH, 
HYPEREMIA of the LIVER, GALLSTONES, CHRONIC CONSTIPATION, 
DIABETES, RENAL CALCULI, GOUT, and DISEASES of the SPLEEN. 



CARLSBAD SPRUDEL-SALT 

In small and frequent doses it is an efficient diuretic, but as an aperient it should be 
taken before breakfast, in doses of from 1 to 2 teaspoonfuls, dissolved in water, preferably 
warm. To increase the aperient action of the Natural Carlsbad Mineral Water, a 
teaspoonfal of the Salt, previously dissolved in a little hot water, should be added. 

SOLE IMPORTERS— [1] 

INGRAM & ROYLE 

London : 82 Farringdon St., E.C. Liverpool: 19 South John St. 

(AND OF ALL CHEMISTS). 




Price List of all Natural Mineral "Waters on application. 

S4 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



xxiii 



TELEPHONE, No. 7522 TELBOBAPHIO ADDBE8B-" IDBIS KENTISH TOWN " 

IDRiS&CO. 

. The Largest Syphon Fillers in the United Kingdom. 

SODA. Brilliant, Pungent, and Sparkling. 

POTASH. Prepared according to the British Pharmacopoeia. 
SELTZER. Pure and Delicious Table Water. 
LITHIA of guaranteed strength. 

LEMONADE. Pnre b %^r of Iipe 

PURITY ^ ater filtered by a special process, by which absolute purity is guaranteed. 
■ will 111 Distilled water used as required. Pure Chemicals only employed. All 
Goods are regularly subjected to strict analysis. 

CI CP A NT 6VD1MNQ Best Block Tin or Silver-plated Tops. 
EL CUM 11 I O I rfHHlOi Idris & Co. make their own Syphons, 

and can therefore guarantee freedom from deleterious metal. 

1 niHBaQT DDIOCO f° r Water, both in Syphons and Bottles. 
LUffCOl rillUCO Write for Price List. 

DSiniMSDT HCI IUCDV our ^ ans m London and 

rFlUMr I UELIwEHI Suburbs. Customers called on 

regularly once or twice a week. Country orders 
despatched same day as received. 



TDRIS & CO. now supply a larger number of the London Hospitals, Public Institutions, 
and Chemists, than any other Manufacturers, which is in itself a sufficient guarantee 
of the excellence and purity of the Waters supplied by them. 

" I have examined the Mineral Waters prepared by IDRIS & CO., and find that In 
regard to Chemical purity and brilliancy, they are unsurpassable." 

JAMES EDMUNDS, M.D., M.R.C.P. Lond., &c. 

Medical Officer of Health and. Public Analyst to St. James't, London, 

IDRIS & COMPANY, 

KENTISH TOWN, LONDON N.W. 



xi iv 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

•TPPMIfllWT 



April 18, 1891 



SYPHONS SELTZOGENES 




gODAWATFR 

MACHINERY 

BRATB^BpiCHUFFE^ 

ANCOATS I 146 MINORIES 

MANCHESTERIlONDONcc 



All our Seltzogenes are 
manufactured on the well- 
known " Fevre " System, 
and each one Is thoroughly 
tested before leaving our 
works. 



PRICES. 

SYPHONS ... 1/6 1/8 and 1/10 each. 

SELTZOGENES. 
1 2 3 4 5 8 pint. 

5/6 6/2 7/ 8/ 9/11 15/6 each. 




PASCALL'S GOLDEN MALTEX 

PATENTED. 

Contains 25 % of Allen & Hanburys' Extract of Malt. 

A NOVEL CONFECTION. 

Delicious Flavour. Brilliant & Attractive Appearance. 
SELLS AT SIGHT. 

Vide Dr. Tanner's Report, and The Chemist and Dmggitt, April 20th. 
1/- Bottles, 91- per dozen ; 1-lb. Bottles, 18/- per dozen , 
and in 2-lb. and 4-lb. Bottles, 1/4 per lb. 

HANDBI LLS POST FREE ON APP LICATION. 

OF ALL WHOLESALE HOUSES, OR OF THE MANUFACTURER, 

JAS. PASCALL, BLAGKFRIARS ROAD, LONDON. S.E. 




CHAS. SOUTHWELL & CO. 



SOLE MAKERS OF THE 



EXCELSIOR TABLE JELLIES 



In Packets of 
half- pint, pint, and 

auart, costing 
less than one third 

of the ordinary 
' Bottled Jellies. 




; x J?s&> 



BLACK CURRANT 

ORANGE 

LEMON 

CALF8FOOT 

VANILLA 

NOYEAU 

CHERRY 

8TRAWBERRY 

R\8PBERRY 

TINE APPLE 



PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. 

CHAS. SOUTHWELL & CO. 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT CONFECTIONERS, I 

IDOCHHEAD, LONDON, S/E. 
36 



w 



CHEMISTS' TEA AGENCY. 

ALKER & DALRYMPLE'S TEAS. 

REDUCED IN PRICE 2d. per lb. 

WALKER «fe DALRYMPLE'S 
BROKEN-LEAF TEA, U Bd. per lb. 
A MONET SATING TEA. AB30LUTELT PURE. 
The small leaf from some of the flneit India and China Teas. Produces 
Tea in the oup, stronger, richer, and cheaper than most whole-leaf Teas. 
Agents appointed, where unrepresented, throughout the United Kingdom. 

WALKER & DALRYMPLE'S 
INTERMEDIATE TEA, U lOi. per lb. 
BEST at the PRICE ETER SOLD. Great strength, and a most useful 
Tea where there is a large consumption. Recommended to all who wish 
to 8 ATE in their Tea. Agents appointed where unrepresented throughout 
the United Kingdom. 

W~ALKER~<fe DALRYMPLE'S TEAS.— 
AGENTS APPOINTED, where unrepresented, throughont the 
United Kingdom. Prospectus and Samples Free on Application. 

Warehouses, 154, 156, 159, and 160 WHITECHAPEL ROAD, and 
2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, and 12 BRADT STREET, LONDON. 
P.O.O. payable at head office. Bankers, National Prorlncial Bank of England 



Aphil 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




DE MARK. THE LANCET: — "About one- third of the whole dry matter constats of true 

peptone, and another third of albumose. A variety of albumen uncoagulated by 
heat."— July 12th, 1890. 

VIENNA POLIKLINIK:—«Yoxit preparations .... have proved 
excellent means of nutrition, and for strengthening individuals of great weakness 
and poverty of blood." — Prof. Schnitzler, Sept. 19th, 1890. 

ENAEYER'S 

STERILISED PEPTONE OF MEAT. 

Considerablymore nutritive than beef, and more palatable than home-made beef -tea ; elegant in appearance. No digestive 
function need, or can, be exercised, all having been fitted for immediate absorption. Life can be supported indefinitely 
upon it, and it does not clog upon the most fastidious and delicate palate. It contains all the stimulative extractives and 
Ihe mineral salts in due proponion, as they exist in beef. Is. per bottle, ready for use. 

LIQUID PEPTONATE OF IRON (DenaeyeF), Is. 6d. per bottle, guaranteed to contain 10 per cent, of the salt In 
solution, equal to 3 30 per cent, of the metal. 

PDLVIS FERRI PEPTONATIS (DenaeyeF), 4s. per ounce bottle, a beautiful reddish-grey powder soluble in water, 
compatible with all alkaline or neutral medicines. 

TRUE PEPTONATE OF IRON is the produce of our laboratory alone, and is our discovery. The salt is precipitated from 
its solution in presence of the acid gastric juice, redissolved and absorbed with great rapidity in the alkaline medium 
met with in the duodenum, so that it does not interfere with digestion, and it is not chemically altered by the juices of 
the alimentary canal. Should be administered before meals, and its flavour requires no disguise. 

PAMPHLETS AND SAMPLES FBEE TO MEDICAL MEN. 

Wholesale General Agents— Edinburgh: DUNCAN, FLOCKHART & CO. Glasgow: OLD APOTHECARIES' COMPANY (Limited). 

Dublin: HAMILTON, LONG & COMPANY (Limited). 

DENAEYER'S PEPTONOIDS AND EXTRACT OF MEAT COMPANY (LIMITED) 

118 BISHOPSGATE STREET WITHIN, LONDON, B.C. 

The following is taJten from, a Clinical Lecture, given 
the Hotel Bieu Hospital, by Dr. J. M. Beatjsoliel, Pro- 
fessor of Histology at the School of Medicine and Surgery : 

" Undoubtedly many persona have been starved to death through 
inexperienced Medical Men and Nursee placing an undue nutritious 
value on such preparations as Extract ol Meat, home made beef-tea 
&c. ; whereas, 

had BOVRIL been used in their stead, the 
patients would, in nine eases out of ten, 
have gained strength to hattle against the 
disease under which they were suffering. 

I have no hesitat ! on to advise you to prescribe to your patients,- to your 
convalescents, to those of your clients who have mental exertions, to 
use Johnston's Bovril, which, in a concentrated form, oontaini a 
substantial tonic and a palatable food. 

"J. M. BEATJSOLIEL, M.D." 




OFFICES:— 30 Farringdon Street, LONDOIJ". 



BRAND & CO.'S 

PEPTONES 



To H.R.H. The Prince of Wales, The Empress of Germany, Ac. 



OF 



BEEF, 
MUTTON, 
VEAL, 

AND 

CHICKEN. 




JBEEF TEA.VEAL.^ 1^ ^ 
MUTTON & CHICKEN BK0THST\ V&t^ 
-TURTLE JELLY, GALFS;Ffjp^ 

JELLY "MEAT L02ENGE> 11 utile stanhope stuect. u»yf»ir. w. (<a> 



27 



xxvi 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGOIST 



April 18, 1891 



EIGHT PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED 




HOUSEHOLD 

SPECIALITIES. 



YORKSHIRE RELISH. 

Moit Delieioua Sauoe In the World. Bott lei, M., U„ tad Ii.e.a). 



eOODALL'S BAKINfl POWDER 

Tbe Beat in the World. Id. Fa.kett ; 84., li., Si. aad 6t. Tlai. 



OOODALL'S EGO POWDER. 

On* 8d. Tin la equal to 26 egg*. Ib id. P»ok.»i ; M., it. li 

»nd bt. Tint. 



OOODALL'S COSTARD POWDER. 

Delieioua Cuetarda without Egga. la Bozet, Hu, Bd.,aid it. task 



OOODALL'S BLANCMANGE POWDER 

Delioioua Blancmange in a Few Minutea. Bex«i,8d.aad 

It. taoh. 



OOODALL'S QUININE WINE, B.P. 

Beat Tonio yet Introduoed. Bottlu, Bd., it. aad li.iaok. 



OOODALL'S GINGER-BEER POWDER, 

Hake a the Beat Ginger-Beer. Paaketi, 3d. and Bd. 



OOODALL'S BRUNSWICK BLACK. 

For Fainting Btovee, Gratea, Iron, Tin, ft*. Id.asd it, BottUi 



OOODALL'S LAVENDER WATER, 

▲ Bieh and Lasting Perfume. Bottloi, It., It., aad 5i. wh. 



OOODALL'S PLATE POWDER, 

For Follahing and Cleaning all Metala. Bazti, 64., It. aad It 



OOODALL'S JELLY SQUARES. 

***** a Delioioua and Hutritloua Jelly. In }-»lnt, l-alat, 
and Qu»rt b.xoo, 3d., Bd., and It. ink, 



PBOPBIHTOBB— GOODALL, BACKHOUSE k CO., LEEDS 



PATENT MEDICINES 

AND 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES. 

Monthly Price Llat of Patent Hedlclnea, Druggists' Sandriea, 
kc, will be aent poat free on application to 

GOODALL, BACKHOUSE & CO., LEEDS. 

28 



TO THE 

CHEMISTS & DRU66ISTS 

OF 

GRE AT BRI TAIN. 

telegraphic address. Bt. Qeorge's, Middle Bt. 

COLEMAN, NORWICH, 
georqe's, Norwich. December, 1887. 

The Excise Authorities having created 
a difficulty as to the sale of Medicated 
Wine containing a certain percentage of 
alcohol, we obtained in January last, from 
the Inland Revenue Authorities, permission 
to sell our WINCARNIS* or Liebig's 
Extract of Meat and Malt Wine, WITH 
QUININE, without a Wine Licence, and 
many Chemists not holding a Wine Licence 
have sold considerable quantities. In order 
further to meet the requirements of the 
trade, we have introduced a Liebig's Extract 
of Meat and Malt Wine, NON-Alcoholic, 
made from the juice of the Grape, Liebig's 
Extract of Meat, and Extract of Malt. This 
also can be SOLD WITHOUT A WINE 
LICENCE. Your orders will oblige either 
direct or through the Wholesale Houses. 
Yours obediently, 

COLEMAN & CO., LIMITED. 

N.B.—The Wine Is sold In Bottles, 2 19 and 416 each. 
Trade prices on application. 

P.8. — Where the Magistrate's Certificate is not held we are 

willing to pay the entire cost of a Retail Certificate (the 

holder of which can sell any kind of Wines) if an assorted 
Order Of 6 dozen i« aent us of any of our preparations. 
List on application. Our WINCARNIS,* or Liebig's Extract 

of Meat and Malt Wine WITHOUT QUININE com- 
mands a very large sale, and is recommended by over two 
thousand medical men who have sent us testimonials in its favour. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS— 

COLEMAN & CO., LIMITED, 

ST. GEORGE'S, NORWICH, 
UD 3 HEW LONDON STREET, LONDON, K.C. 

* WINCARNIS is a new name, registered to prevent 
fraudulent imitations. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST 



AND DRUGGIST 



1 



. -s-v-.*£3,o Aerated Water, Manufacturers 

life * - r,. M 




Are Guaranteed to be the Finest in the Market 

mini i.r miin /J( c ^ c 

W.HAY , Manufacturing, Chemist^ u,,^ 




In orderinc Specify HAY'S Manufacture 



A WOND ERFUL S UCCESS !! 
NON-INTOXICATING BEER 

Made from MASON'S Original 



EXTRACT of HERBS 



(BXGI8TERKD.) 

Composed of Yarrow, Dandelion, Comfrey, & Horehonnd, 

ENLARGEMENT OF SIZE. 

A Sixpenny Bottle makes EIGHT GALLONS of 

HERB or BOTANIC BEER 

A NON-INTOXICATING BEVEBAOE 
Fnll ef Body and Flavour, with a Creamy Head like Bottled Ale, the moat 
perftot lubstitute for Alcoholic Drinks ever discovered, for either 
Bummer or Winter. 
BEWARE of mean and fraudulent imitations. 
BEWARE of others copying our title. 
MASON'S ia the original and only genuine. 
MASON'S is a Speoial Compound entirely from Herbs 

NO OTHER EXTRACT MAKES BEER LIKE IT. 
Sold in Bottles at fid., 1/, & 2/ each, with directions. 



MASON'S WINE ESSENGES 



Make Tomporanoe Win on In a few minutes. 
Ginger, Orange, Lemon, Raapberry, Black Currant, fto. 
Thaie an having a very large aale now, and are ext*»->ely advertiiid. 
Sold In Bottlea at ea., la., and 34. oaoh. 

Quotation* on application, 

80 m l A^°JJ; NEWBALL & MASON, 

ilanufadnring ChemUU and Botanic Drugging NOTTINGHAM. 



CHEMISTS 



CAN SAVE 



AND 




by selling my "Plain Label" Lines, and 
should remit price quoted for a sample 

J-gross, sent carriage paid, on first 

occasion; and if not satisfactory, I will 
also pay carriage back and. return the cash. 
Yours faithfully, 

PETER TYRER. 

PENNY MENTHOLS 

On j-gross Cards, at 5/6 and 6/6. 

PENNY (TASTELESS) PILLS 

6 in a box, ^-gross Cards, at 4/6. 
SPECIAL NEW LINE. 

PENNY (TASTELESS) PILLS, 

e pills rrsr glass tubes. 

On J- gross Cards, at 5/6. 

PENNY PERFUMES. 

GLASS TUBES. 

On i-gross Cards, at 6 6. 



PENNY TOOTH TINCT. 

With Wool complete. On J-gross Cards, at 5/6. 



PENNY CORN SOLVENT 

On J gross Cards, at 5/6. 



PENNY COURT PLASTER. 

On \- gross Cards, at 4/. 



For sums under £1 please remit Postal Order, 
not Cheque , and oblige, 

PETER TYRER, 

70 Long Lane, LONDON, S.E. 

29 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



PEPT0N1SED COCOA & MILK 

.A.HST1D CONOE1TTRATED 

PEPTONISED MILK 

(PATENT). 

These two preparations are made with pure rich PRE-DIGESTED Country 
Milk, and, by mere dilution with hot water, afford a delicious restorative 
beverage . the assimilation of which requires no digestive effort. 



SAVORY & MOORE 



Tins Is. 6d. and 2s. 6d. Obtainable Everywhere, 

The " MEDICAL PBEB8 AND CIBCUTjAH " !— 

" Certainly this preparation i»of delicate flavour . . . It ii 
perfectly soluble ... the small quantity required (or the 
Immediate preduotlea of a eup of excellent cocoa will ensure far this 
1 Elect Extraot' a favourable reception at tbe hands of persons ei 

weak digestion, and all whs prefer this 
wholesome beverage to tea and eeSea. 



ROWNTREES 




The «' BBITI8H MEDICAL 
JOUENAL" says:— 
" Rown tree's Cocoa Extraot 
li one of the best. Its fla vour and 
aroma are good. Cocoa thus pre- 
prepared is one of the most dlgasUbl* 
article! of food." 



YORK, ENGKLAHT^ 




LIEBIG'S BEEF WINE. 

Composed of Liebier's Extract of Beef, Extract of Malt, 
and sound Port Wine. 

REPORT ON BEEF WINES. 

From the results of my Analyses o vaiious Beef Wines I have had occasion to examine, none have 
equalled an regards strength, purity of ingredients, and (of no less importance) the skilful and 
judicious manner in which the icspective ingredients have been proportioned and combined, the 
Llebig's Beef Wine manufactured by Mr. B. Kobinson, of Pendleton, Manchester. 

It is in every sense a reliable reparation, embodying in a pleasing and palatable form all the 
acknowledged medicinal and nutritive properties pertaining to Liebig's Extraot of Meat, 
Extraot of Malt, and sound Fort Winn. 

WILLIAM ELBOBNE. FC 8., P.L.S., 
Lecturer on Materia Medica in the Owens College, Manchester (Victoria University), 
December 15, 1888. 

xntrodno^iMs.] ROBINSON'S CONCENTRATED WATERS. n****^ i».. 



Cne Ounse of these 
according to 



Waters added to Forty Ounoes of Distilled Water forms a elear Medlonted Water (without filtering), similar In every raspeet to thoa* prepared 
tht dlrsetions of the British Pharmacopoeia, and free from all Ohemtoal impurity. They will keep good any length of time in any ollmate. 




Aqua Anethl, Oonoent., 4/ lb. 
Anlal „ 4/ 
Cnmphorn „ 4/ 
Oarul „ ♦/ 



Aqua Olnnam. Tar. Oonoont., 91 lb. 
Oasslat . „ 4/ „ 

Flor. Aurant. „ B/8„ 
T\or. Samhuel „ 8/0,, 



Aqua PoBnloull, Oonoent., 4/ lb. J Aqua Plmentst, Oonoent. 4 lb 
Xenth. Pip. „ 4/ „ I „ Boast „ 8/e . 

„ Aug. „ 8/ „ I ., Boast Virgin „ 10 6 , 
, . mi ,, I , , rii>r. aamouei ,, Vlrld. ■• * .. I 

The above are put up In Bottles of i lb. or 1 lb. and upwards, eaoh of which has the Inventor's Protection Label over Cork. 
From tht l.tHCBT, .lulu 18, 1882 :_ " Coif OKTBATaD WiTSas (Kohlnson's, Pendleton, Manchester)— Among the samples sent to 
ns we find Aq. Anethl, Anisl, Olnnam. Ver., Boast, and some doaen of others. Diluted w th forty parti of water they form ths 
ordinary waters of the Pharmaoopoela. They are excellent in v*alttv. and will be very useful, especially In country practice. CI] 
Wholesale Hitaoir * Oct.. London, and most Provincial Wholesale Druggists. BPaBBD BT THB 1NTBMTOB. 

B. ROBINSON, MANUFACTURING CHEMIST, DISTILLER, AND BREWER OF BRITISH WINES, MANCHESTER. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



3 



S. ©. CLEMENTS & GO, 



/EstaMlshed 

1812. 



) BRISTOL ANNATTO WORKS. 



/EstiihlliiheclN 
^ 1812. ) 



LIQUID EXTRACT ANNATTO. 

A very bright, clear, aud strong solution. 



ANNATTO IN CAKE. 



OIL BUTTER-COLOURING. 



(Mving, when dissolved, a deep Orange Stain with 1 Unsurpassed in riohnoss of tint, and unobjeo- 
minimum of sediment. tlonablo in taBte or odour. 



PRIME RENNET/"' 

Has each season an increasing lale. / vJ"~ 

RENNET POWDER (FOR JUNKETS, &C.),I 

In handsome Tins, 6d., 1'-, 1'6. \ C£g5 

DRUG & SPICE MILLS, 




HEC1STLHEI? 



PRIME RENNET 

Produces the Maximum of Ourd. 
SPECIAL PRICES TO BTJYEHS IN BULK. 

Grinders of all kinds of Drugs and Spices 
for Cattle Powders. &c. 

12, 13 « It LEWIN'S MEAD, BRISTOL. 



ORIGINAL INVENTORS OF 



FLUID EXTRACT of ANNATTO 



INDISPENSABLE TO THE DAIRY FARMER. 
' ABSOLUTELY PURE & INNOCUOUS. 

Contains a Greater Amount of Pure 



<Colour in Solution than acy other make, g 

Leaves no Sediment. 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED. 

WIVT. NICHOLLS & 




Used and Valued by Dairy Farmers 
throughout the United Kirjgdom, Canada, 
% New Zealand. Australia, and the Cape ; also 



a^^^^A in tbe United States of America, Sweden, 
^Eg^^gf Denmark, France, Switzerland, Italy, and 



:.:rMHf 



Russia. 



WHOLESALE and for EXPORT ATI ON 



TRADE MARK. 

CO., Rowden Hill, Chippenham, "WIJLTS. 



SAMPLES AND PRICK LI8TS FREE ON APPLIOATION. 



"MYRTLE GROVE" TOBACCO 

In 1-oz., 2-oz., and 4-oz. Packets, and i, i, 1 lb. Tins only. 

TADDY & 00., 45 Hinories, LONDON 

ESTABLISHED ISO TBAB3. 

SNUFF , TOBACCO, AND SEGAR MANUFACTU RERS. 

Write for JL.18* of" Specialities. 





ILLAR'S BRITISH WINES. 

ORANGE (iilUblt lor QllllM), GINGEK, EAISIN COWSLIP, CHERRY, 4c 

A. MILL AR & CO,, Thomas Street, DUBLIN. 

«*»!• Arenta for London and District — H. J. BOYD ANT * CO., 76 Aora Lane. Brixton. B." 



. i. 



"RAMORNIE." LIEBIG'S Mract 01 Meat - 

As supplied to the Admiralty, War, and India Offloos. 

:-lb. Jan p«rlb. 6/9 per 81/0 I 2-o*.J»r« ...per lb. 7/8 f* 1 '•«• ll/g 

Mb. J»r«.. ~ „ 7/0 , 42/0 l-«.Jan „ 8/4 ~ ~- n §/» 

rib. Jar»„„„„ . „ 7)8 21/9 | |-m. Jars . „ 8/8 » 

QUOTATIONS TOB 1XTBACT IN "BtTLK" ON APPLIOATION. ■ ■ ■ 

Writ* for DetatUd Price Litt to the Auitrallan lttal Co., 9 and 11 Fenchureh Avenue, E.O, 6 tbi. Carriage fret. 

81 



4 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Aran, IK, 1891 



NURSERY AND NURSING REQUISITES. 




FEEDING BOTTLES. 



The following are a few of the approved styles regularly stocked, which 
are saleable and give great satis' ac ion to customers. They are con- 
structed of the best materials on souad principles, and yield good profit. 



GltKKN, Sc'eic Glass Hoppers. 
White fittings, 3/ per dozen, 

in box. Each boxed, 3/6 

per dozen. 
Black fittings. 3/3 per dozenj 

in box. Each boxed, 3/ 

per dozen. 
The same in 1/ quality, 4/9 

and 6/3 per dozen. 
With Boxwood Tops, 2/4 to 

3/1 per dozen. 
White Glass Bottles, 24. per 

dozen extra. 




SANDBINGHAM. (Is.) 

White, Screw Glass Stopper*. 
Each in a box. 
White fittings, 5, 6 ; Black, 6/ per dozen. 





SANDBINGHAM. Qs.) 
Whiik, Earthenwart Tops. 
Each in box. 
White fittings, 5/3 ; Black, 6/ per dozen. 




COLONIAL. (6d.) 
GitKEX, Screw Glass Stoppers. 

White fittings, 3/ per dozen, 

in box. Each boxed, 3. 6 

per dozen. 
Black fittings, 3 3 per dozen, 

in box. Each boxed, 3/9 

per dozen. 
The same in IJ quality, 4/9 

and 5,3 per dozen. 
With Boxwood Tops, 2/4 to 

3/1 per dozen. 
White Glass Bottles, 2d. per 

dozen extra. 



THE 

OLD-FASHIONED 
BOTTLE 

is i-- tin 
coming 
into use, 

many 
doctors 
preferring 
it. We 
have all 
the shapes 
& supply 

them 
fitted and 
unfitted. 
Thus the 
kind as 

shown in figure, best quality, 
3 sizes, assorted, are 3/ per 
dozen bottles ; fittel with 
black teat and boxwood-top 
cork, with brush complete, 
in box, 8/6 per dozen. 





FlG.3. 



mm- 




PERFECT TUBE CLEANER. 

There is nothing to beat this. It is perfect from the sanitary point of view. Use as 
shown above. Price 8, per gross. 



FITTINGS. 



INDIA-RUBBER 
TUBING. 

White, Brown, and 
Black, 2d. to 4rf. 
per yard. 

GLASS TUBES. 

10d per gross. 




BREAST EXHAUSTER, 

white fittings, 5/9 per dozen ; 
black fittings, 6/3 per dozen. 



MAY, ROBERTS & CO. 

Wholesale Druggists' Sundriesmen 

Dealers in Patent Medicines, Proprietary Articles, Perfumery, 
Mineral Waters, Lozenges, &c, &c. 

9 GLERKENWELL ROAD, LONDON, E.C. 

PKICE LIST ON APPLICATION. 



TEATS. 




All sizes and shapes, White, 
Brown, and Black, put np in 
1-dozon boxei. 

Smallest size. White 5<f., 
seamless 1/; Black 8<f., seam- 
less 1' per dozen. 

Other sizes in proportion. 



Complete Fittings for all 
kinds of Bottles. Also 
Spare Bottles in any 
quantity from single 
bottles to original 
crates. 



32 



Telephone .Number, itsaa. 



Telegr»piilo Addron — CEKH1LU B L.OHDOBT, 



ADYERTISERS' AND BUYERS' REFEREN CE LIST AMD IN DEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 

ABYERTISEMENTS APPEAEIM IN THIS ISSUE OP "THE CHEMIST AND DRU&&IST." 



JaOTB. — The kVolloe itawi 1 a ihia Inslati ar« tnoaa at the) FOOX of She, B?a»re», *■< not at ia* »e>». 
Thl» krranrcaemt Is atcciMrj 1b oraor to moot tho requlroaaents of tao Post Ofllco. 



Foot or Page 

A dame, Webster & Co 88 

Allen & Hauburys 10 

Anteczma 94 

Apolliusrit, The, Co Cover 

Armbreeht, Nelsou 4 Co. 53. 54, 55, 
56. 57, 5s\ 59, 60, 61 

Australian Drug Co f8 

Australian Meat Co 31 

Ayrton 4 Sannders 41 

Betels, R , & Co 36 

Balm of Ilethesda Co 95 

Barclay at Sons (Lim.) 83 

Barnrtt & Foster 22 

Barrett, K. H 84 

Barron, H irveys 4 Co 76 

Bay ley 4 Co 38 

Beechani, T 66 

Berkley, J 95 

Beyer Freres 20 

Bidwell Bros. (Lim.) 39 

Bishop, A , 4 Sons 78 

Btacttwell, G G 34 

Blair's Gout Pills 95 

Blake 4 Mackenzie 12 

Blondeau 4 Cie 9, 11, 98 

Blyton, Astley 4 Co 44 

Book, Osoar 78 

Boehm.F 72 

Boord 4 Son 90 

Bo?ril(Lim.) 27 

Bowdlear, W.H., 4 Co 90 

Bowers Bros 93 

Bowling 4 Govier 86 

Brand ^ Co 27 

Bratby 4 Uinohlifle (Lim.) 26 

Brett, F, J Coloured Supplement 

Bronnley 4 Co 42 

Brunner, Mond 4 Co. (Lim.) . . 64 

Burroughs, James SO 

Burroughs, Wellcome 4 Co.45, 46. 47, 

48, 49, 50 

Bygrave, J. 4 W 86 

Oadbury Bros Cover 

Oarmicbael. M. W 94 

Chalmers. W. B 92 

Christy, T., A Co 93 

Clay, Dod & Co 76 

Clements, S. G., 4 Cj 31 

Cocking & Co 71 

Coleman 4 Co 28 

Corsan, J. H 95 

Day, son 4 Hewitt 91 

Denaeyer's Peptonoids and 

Extract of Meat Co 27 

De St. Dalmas 95 

Durrant. G., 4 Co 95 

Eades' Pills 36 

Eau de Botot ... 40 



Foot Of Page 

Edwards, W., 4 Son 72 

Elton & Co 76 

Elllman, Sons * Co Text 552 

Eschmann Bros. 4 Walsh .... 40 

Evans. Sons & Co 93, Cover 

Evans, Lescher.fc Webb.London 73,93 

Evans 4 Sons (Lim.) 73, 93 

Exchange Column 16 

Felton, Grimwado 4 Co 70 

Ferris 4 Co 75 

Fink, F., 4 Co 94 

Fitoh 4 Nottlngbum 72 

Fletoher, Fletoher 4 Stevenson 

Text 552 

Ford, Shapland 4 Co 12 

Fordham, W. B., 4 Sons (Lim.) 21 

French H ygienic Society 66 

Fuerst Bros 71 

Gibson, K., 4 Sons... 6 

Glass Lined Syphon Co (Lim.; 23 

Goodall, Backhouse 4 Co 28 

Green, C. 4 Co 95 

Greensill, T. S., 4 Son 94 

Grindley 4 Co 89 

Gueret Freres 22 

Guy's Touic S)3 

Hamilton 4 Co. (Lim.) 88 

Hargreaves, Dr. M. K., M.D. . . 14 

Hay, W 19 

Haywood, J. H 83 

Hearon, Squire 4 Francis .... 52 

Henry, H. W 78 

Hewlett, C. J., 4 Son 67 

Hookin, Wilson 4 Co 80 

Hoiloway, P 72 

Bolroyd, J., 4 Co 18, 19 

Hooper, W., Si Co Cover 

Horn 4 Son 94 

Houghton, G., 4 Son 14 

Howlett. S 86 

Hugh, Higbgate 4 Co 91 

Hyde, Nash 4 Co 95 

Idris 4 Co 25 

Ingram 4 Royle 24 

Isaacs, I., 4 Co 84 

Jackson, W. 4 H 77 

Jewsbury 4 Brown 24, 38 

Jones 4 Co V0 

Jordan 4 Co 75 

Keith, B„ 4 Co 72 

Kempthorne, Prosser 4 Co. . . 71 

Kent, G. B., 4 Sons .. 88 

Kilner Bros ' 85 

Kuhn, B 75 

Lakeman, J. J 94 

Lakin, W. H 94 

Layng, R. 0 94 



Foot of Page 

Learner, A. J 9b 

Lcath 4 Itoss 4 

Lonnon, B. G., 4 Co 70 

Levermoro, A., 4 Co 94 

Levy, Julias 70 

Liquor Carnis Co. (Lim.) 15 

Llvei pool Lint Co fc2 

Lloyd, T. Howard. 4 Co 65 

Loftuouie 4 Saltmer 75 

London Homceopathlo Hospital 

and .Medical School 14 

Loze, A., dr. Co. (Lim.) 23 

Lucas, 0. W., 4 Co 94 

Lynoh 4 Co C'otwr 

Marion 4 Co 50 

Marriot, E., 4 Co 40 

Martindale, W 77 

Marx, JI.4E 95 

Mason, 0. E., & Co 43 

Mather, W 96 

Maw. S., Son, & Thompson .. 7 

May 4 Baker (Limited) Cover 

May, Roberts ii Co 32 

Meliu, C 2J 

Millar, A., 4 Co 31 

Millar, J. 4 G 79 

Mills, It. M., 4 Co 35 

Moryoseph, A 94 

Moss, J., 4 Co Text 552 

Mumford, G. S Text 552 

Muter. Dr 12 

Natali 4 Co 86 

Natali, H 86 

Newball 4 Mason 29 

Newbery, F., 4 Sons 35 

Nicholls, W., & Co 31 

Noakes, B„ 4 Co Text 552 

Oakey, J., & Sons 89 

Oldneld, Pattinson 4 Oo 3 

Oruie 4 Co 13 

Orme, J,, 4 Co 13 

Parkes, G. J. R 76 

Pascail, J 23 

Peake, Allen 4 Co 72 

Pears, A. 4 F 51 

Perken, Son 4 Kay meat 14 

Peterson, M., 4 Co 40 

Poppelreuter, W 36 

Potter 4 Clarke 37 

Poulenc Freres 76 

Prosser, Taylor & Oo 69 

Quilliam, J.. & Oo 94 

Radams' Microbe Killer Oo. 

(Lim) 36 

Randall & Sou 3ii 

Rankin, W., 4 Sons 82 

Raphael, J., 4 Co 14 

Remus, T 88 



Foot of Page 

Richardson, W. II " 

Robinson, B 3 U 

Robinson Si Sons 82 

Rocke. Tompsltt 4 Co 70 

Rookledge, J s,l 

Rowland, A., 4 Sons 40 

Rowntreo 4 Co j) 

Salnsbury, B 95 

Salvine 93 

Sanderi, H. ii., 4 Sons 40 

Sanford 4 Son 94 

Sanger 4 Sons ?Q 

Sanitag, The, Oo Text 55? 

Savorv 4 Moore 30 

Schacht, W., 4 Oo 22 

Sohool of Pharmaoy, The .... 12 

Schweppo. J., 4 Co Text 552 

Seabuiy 4 Johnson 97 

Shirley, A. W 81 

Silicated Carbon Filter Co. Text 552 

Singleton Colo (Lim.) 36 

Smith, Stephen. & Co 90 

Soul, W. H.. <s Co 63 

Bouthwell, C , 40o 2-i 

Spirone, The, Co 84 

Sterner, E., & Co 83 

Stern, G. 4 G 74 

Stevens, P. A 95 

Stipenduui Stopper Co 92 

8tokes, G. R , 4 Co. (Lim.).... 8» 

Taddy 4 Oo 31 

Thompson, W. P., 4 Co. . . Text 552 

Tiduian 4 Son 42 

Tomlinson 4 Hay ward 50 

Toogood, W 87 

Towle, A. P., 4 don 74 

Townseud. J 12 

Treatt, R. C 38 

Truetitt, H. P. (Lim.) 42 

Tuubridge 4 Wright 79 

Tyrer. P 29 

Tyrer. Thonuu. 4 Co 17 

Van Hargan, J 5 

Walker 4 Dalrym pie 2b' 

Walaer, Troke ac Co 91 

Warrick Bros 33 

Warrin, tm Ohtmical Co 74 

Washington Cuemical Co 77 

Wedgwood, J., 4 oon 89 

West, T 40 

Wolstenoroft 4 Co 94 

Wood, F 83 

Wood, V 82 

Wright, Layman 4 Umney .. 8 

Text 552 

Wright, W. V., 4 Co 5u 

Wyleys 4 Co 62, 65 

Ziemer, B. W., & Co. 44 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ALL ADYERTISERS 

Whose Announcements appear in " THE CHEMIST AND DRUQO-IST." Those whose Names 
do not appear above, are published in one of the other issues of this month. 

OATAUNIVl 



Apolunarts Co. 
■arneftand Poe»e> 
Chamieta' Atratta Waten 

Association. 
flUla A Son (ItuthlB) 
Franz, Joseph, Co. 
Ouber Spring 
Haisr.ll and in. 
Mar, w. 
Idrla and u < 
Ingram and Boyle 
Jawermry anu o.wrva 
Kinmond and Co. 
MlUa una uo. (Hour**) 
Henoch 1, W,, and O" 
fichweupe, J., and Co. 

■itto run 

[Bee BXPMOKB and KBirfOH. 

Barnett and Foater 
Bratby and Hlnehll6*e(Ld.) 
Buerel f - . ■ 

Losl. A., and Oo. 
Mabou, A. Newton 
friar, ujwu», _„« c. 



LUZ1 



aoitxo 

Fuerst Broa. 

Greeff, B. W., and Oo. 

Morris and C«uarui.»alU) 

AfliAATTS 

Ohlaon. A. 

wrm«,j, and Co. (Selentlfltl 
Perken, bon and Hayment 
Shears J., and Sua 
Wedtwooa m aoua (Mortars) 



TiriCIAL lTUt 

Book, Oaoar 



Aeard, Ed. 

Anstralian Drug Oo. 

oooklnK and 00. (Japan) 

Felton Grlmwade and Oo. 
(Melbourne) 

Fousera and Oo. (New York) 

Kempthome.Proaaer ACs.N.t 

Lennon, B. Q„ and Oo, 

Levy, Jules 

Pease, Allen and Oo. 

Froeeer, Taylor and Oo. 

Koberta (Paris, ao.i 

btoeke, TompalliardO >.(attl- 
bouraei 

Bharland and Oo. 

Sonl. w. H.. and Oo. 
USaMiOIDS 

Howard! and Sonsf Olnsttona 

smith T and U., and Oo. 
IMMCUIl. 

Mar and Bar.*! (Limited) 

White, and a„. 

ANNATTO 

Clements, 9. O., A Co. 
Moholls, « . ■■ Cu. 



HaUey, W. H„ and to* 
ttohlnaon and Sons 
tohutte, F. and Co. 
KASM* FOWDIl 
Soodal). Hiokhonae * Oo, 

Bowdlaar, W . H., and Oo, 
1IUAKE. IOIA 

Brunner , Mond and Oa.« Ldm, 
Howards and Ho"* 
Mar and Baku (Limited) 



Hearon, oguire and Fraaalt 

Hewlett and Sons 

Howaidn and So*" 

May and Baker (Limited) 

Xvmes *nd On. 

Tyrer, T„ and Co. 

Wune, aiireu, and Sonl 

SOTTIBS 

aire andCalderBottleOo.dll.) 
Barnett and Foater 
Barrett, it. H . 
Bratby and Hmchllfla IhS.) 

BreiTlfa (Lim.) 
Bvans. Sons and Oo 
Qliuertsun, H., »ua Sonl 
Hearn, B. A„ and Oo. 
tsaaea and Oo. 
Johnsen and Jdrgonaen 

t Brua. 

Mark, J., and Co. 
Poths, H., and Oo. 
anlrlay, A. W. _ , 
thampaon, W altera. Hole «na 
Xuj*ood, W. Oo. (Lim.) 

▼oaldon. Ja. 

IOOKE 

Dr. Hargrearet. M.D. 

Lewla, if. K . 
Muter, Dr. 

■avnaai 

Bldweil Bros., Lim. 
Bvans, doua and Co. 
Keub, u). i>„ auu auus 
atosaler. Ua»ld and Sons 

BVTTait OOU, 4um, 

Olemonta, S. O., A Co. 
uianeiu, 1 ... n a td Oo. 
lumllnaonaud U&yward 



Austin and Oo. (Oar^ board) 
Ayrton and Saunders 
nnalmera, W. B. 

Evans, Sons and Go. 
H oases, M., and Uu. 
Owen, J., Jr 

"••rmeut^r, LW.and Oo. !!«• 
Bemus, T. 
aiioiuaon and Sons 

OAKP30B 

Fordham, W.B., and S jni(Ld 1 
r uerac liroa. 
Howards and Sona 
Keaneand Ashwe'l (Homoeo- 
May A Baker (Ltd) [pathtej 

OAtTOK OlJk 

Allen and Hanburr 

Fner«t. Broa. 

Oreefl, B. W.,and Oo. 
Lofodon Cod Liver Oil Go. 

3A?I«1.BI 

(MIT&IiUO 

Balls and Oo. 
orboks, Peel and Oo 
Banders, H. 0., and toa 

OAVIIMI 

Uenonal, J. (Madlalaal' 
Danoan, Flookhart ai d Co. 
Bvans, Bona and Oo. 
Fournier, Bou and Oo. 
Hooper, B., and Oo 

omaatM. baorai*. 

Pnnean, Flookhart and Oo. 
Brana, sona and Oo, 
Farrla and to. 
mijii, J., and Oo. 



Lynch and Oo. 

Maw, S.. Son ■, Thompson 

,.. . . . . va Mi. 1^ 

tauter and Son 
OKJaaaa. JTK^VX TV 

Lerarmore, Aua., and Oo. 
a*hlta. A., and 80ns 

•mucins o» 0010 

Greed. K W. and Oo. 
ttowiana. is. 

aa.iMX.xom or UMa 

Oo* ernment Sanitary Co. 
N*tl >"".' Oheralnal Oo. 

aBEKIUAAS 

audroae. Oaoar and Oo. 
doenm, F 

Bram well, £., and Son 
di nnnar, atouu »ua uo., Lia. 
Bnsn, W., don and Oo. 
rietoner Pie ou« Awiareniorj 
Fnerat Brothers 
aruuuaii. riaosnouaa and Oo. 
oreen, it. w.. anu Oo. 
dill, A. a., aud don 
Aodgkinaona, Treacher an* 
Clarke 

gowaruaand Bon (Fhara.) 

AnAu.B. 

Lerermora, Aug., and Oa 
LotlooLiae and Maimer 
May and Baas, (Llmlud) 
Morna nud UaUai» 
Moaa aud Oo. 
Poulenc, Freree 
BaajeBroa. and Oo. 
ainiiu, r. ana H., and Oo. 
atom. O. and G. (PanullM) 
Tvrer, T ..and Oo. 
WaahlnKlo" Chemloa 
Walla, a., ana sou* 
Zl nmermaan. A. and M, 

M 



THE CHEMIST. AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



•««T noxoiu 

Bolport, Bros. 

•notoom 

Davenport (Browne's) 
Tow U, A. P., and Boa 

flllOKOFOXN, *.«. 

Snneu, Flookhart and 00. 
Greeff, R. W., and Co. 
Macfarlan. J. P., and Son 
Mason, A 11. 
■>nlth T. and H.. an<l Oo. 
Warrington Chemical Co. 
Wright, Layman and Umner 
Ilmmormann. A. and M . 

•XTKIO ACID 

Haiial! and Co. (Phospho) 
•804niE-ITDM. 

Howard! and Bona 

fooA wnii 

Armbreoht, Nelson and Oo. 
?rench Hvglerlo Boo. 
J ozena, Gabriel 
Marianl and Co. 

•OOOA *. OXOOH1 

Oadbnry Bro» Fit and Sons 
Christy and Co. 
Kowntree ana uo. 
OOD1IVH OIL 

Allan and Hanburys 
Rurroughs. Wellcome and Oo 

Evans, Sons and Co. 
Greed, R. W.,anu Co. 
till. A. 8.. and Son 
Jackson, W. and H. 
Lofoden Cod Liver Oil Oo. 
Loftnouae and Saltinei 
Bmlth, T. J. 

Bouthall Bros, and Barclay 
Woolley. Bona and Uo. 

•OPPaa Essence) 

Symington and Oo. tuuuee 
• 01PSIBI.M Tliai 

Belts and Oo. 
B'ooki. Peel and Oo. 
landers, H. 8., and Bon 

c *mi . Masxoxxraa 

Allan and H anbury ■ 
Blyton, A st ley and 00. 
Burroughs, Welloomeand Oo 
Puerst Bros. 

Hooper. B., & Oo. 

Mo & Oo. 

Lloyd, T. H., and Oo. 
Wyiayi ana Uu 

COVnCTaOVIKT 

Blyton, Astley and Oo. 
fltbeon, K., and Ions 
Ksrfoot. T. 
P tsoall. J. 

Southwell, C, A Co. 
ifarrlek bro.uo. . 

■ OVO IVTi XXQB. 

Brans, Sons and Oo. 
Pletehe-.F'itcher* Stevenson 

Lloyd, T. H., and Co. 

tJOMM CVXI1 

■•^urr* J«hn" ,, 'V p laBtera) 
Thompson. IT. It. Xoung, H. 

• OtTOX WOtli 

Paynes, Q.,k Oo. (Absorbent) 
Robinson and 8ons (Abarbat.) 
danger, J., and Sons 
Isabury and Johnson 

•»is ixwaaaa 

Mamford. 8. G. 

SXHTITKIOM 

Ban rie Botot 
Evans, Soub and Co. 
FenUman and Co. 
Jewsourj ana Biown 
Lakeraan, J. J. 11 Sal vine " 
Lowe. 0. 
Quelch, H. 0. 
■ T SSivlne" 
Steve in, P. A. 
Intton. O., and Oo. 
" The Alexandra" (Zlemer) 
Thompson and Capper 
Warriok Bros. 
Woods, W. AreeaNut) 

»MW»»IST«' If]- 

Ayrton and Saunders 
Bailey, M , and Oo. 
Barclay and Sons ( Limited) 
Brans, Lescher and Webb 
Evans Sous, and Co. (8av»rs' 
Fordham, W. is.. &a«n»(Llm.) 
GUberteon, H., and Sons 
Hill. A. B and Son 
Hookln, Wilson and Oo 
Idris and no. 
Jackson, W. and H. 
Bay Bros., Liu.. 
Lynch and Oo. 
Mark, J., and Co. 
Harriot, B. and Co. 
v asor. A. N»^ton 
Haw, Son, a Thomnson, S. 
«ay, Huberts ana C .. 
Queloh, H. O. 
Kaii kin, W., and Bom 
■anger and Sim 
Schutze and Co. 
Thompson, Waiters, Hole and 

Co., I. in, 
Tldman and Son 
Toogood. W. 
Wood. Vincent 

DKUO GRIND 

Jordan and Co. 
9KUMS 

Berger, P. 

84 



■unnoT, 

Adams, Webster and Co. 
rieioner Bros and Oo. 
Oovemment Sanitary Oo. 
Grlndley and Co. (Llm.) 
Hamittnn and Oo. (Lira.) 
JoyeB' Plnld 
Na.ional Chemical Oo. 
Stnttae Oo. 
8 jabury and Jnhnso" 

mam x>a ooxom 

Parina, J. M. 
Martin, Maria (Nan) 
B1ASTIC HOSIIBT 

Wood, V. 
■ UCTXXO AI1AI 
Darton, P., and Co. 
Gent and Oo. 
Lancister, J., and Son 
Orme and Oo. 
IWIMAI 
Evans, Sons and Oo. 
Banger and Son 
■BGXAVUI 
Barker, W. and Ion 
Oorsan, R. 
Young, C. A A., & Co. 
BiHENCBa 
Rsckett. W. Boehm, P. 
Berger, P. 

Brainy and HlnchllOe (Ld.) 
Rurgoyue, Burbidgesand Oo. 

Bush, Son, and Co. 
itush, W. j., and Oo, 

Oummook. J 

De Carle and Son 
Pirth, H. 

Goodall, Baekbonsa and 00 
Hay, W. Idris and Uo. 
May and Bake. (Limited) 
Millar, A., and uo. 
Newball and Mason 
Oldneld, Fattiusou and 00. 
Stevenson and Howell 
Tyrer, P. (Anchovies) 
Tyrer, T., aud Co. 
Wooliey. Sons and Oo 
SISBNTIAa OZIiS 
Berger, P. 
Boenm.F. 
Bush, W. J., and Oo. 
Bush, W Son and Oo. 
Olay, Dod and Co. 
Cooking a Co. (Japan Peeper- 
Oummook. J. mint; 
Drysdale, J. W., and Co. 
Bvans. Sons ana Oo. 
Pirth, H. rOlarke 
Hodgktuinns. '•"reach— »"■. 
Lambert, S., and Co. (Sandal 
Woodi 

Vav and Baker (Limited) 
Miller, J. A G. 
Mourard, J. 
Poppelreuter, W. 
Stevenson ana uowell 
Byrnes and Co. 
Treatt, B. 0. 
Togt, G., and Oo. 
Warrick Brothers 
Wright, Layman and Umuiy 

mix 

Dunoan, Flookhart aad Oo. 
Howards and 8o- 
Mar and Rak«» (Limited) 
Bobbins, J., ana uo. 
Tyrer, T., and Co. 
White, A., aud Sum 
Woolley, Sons and Oo. 
Wright, Lavman and Umnei 
IXTKACTI, PX.VXB 
Allen and Hanburys 
Barber, G., and Oo 
"Rnrgoyne. Rurbldges and Oo. 
Daktn Brothers 
jsvans, Sons and Oo. 
Fletcher, Fletcher AS tevenson 
Hearon, 8quir* and Pranele 
Hooper. B.. and n ~ 
Lloyd, T., Howard and Co. 
Moss and Co. 
Potter and Clarke 
Wright. Layman and Uiansy 
EXTRACT, BKBsVT 
Australian Meat 00. 
Boviil (Limited) 
Brand and On. 

Denaeyer's Peptone and Bx- 

trnot of Meat Oo. (Llm.) 
Llebig On. 

Liquor Carnls Co. (Llm.) 
Mason, G„ and Co. (Llm.) 

p.aa»iNo» .orrii 

Bretnts, B. and Oo., LIB. 
Bvans. Sons and Oo. 
Hearn, B. A., and Oo. 
tonkin, Wll."" *-« Qq, 

Jackson, W. and II. 

in»r Mrns. 
Lynch ft Co. 
jaarnut, K., and Oo. 
May, Boberts ana uo. 
Thompson, Walters. Hols and 

Oo. (Limited) 
Tor good. v 

B>XtT PAMXI 

Ford. Rhadanii unit Oo, 
Tunbridge and Wright 
Wilson, d 
POOD Infanta'* Invalids') 
Allen and Hanburys 
Baeli, K., and Oo. 
Brand and Oo. 
Goodall, Backhouse and Oo 
Hearon. Squire and Francis 
Llebig Oo. 

Liquor Oarnls Oo. (Llm.) 
Mottersheaa a Uo. ( Benger's 

w«,tle. H. Pood) 
Bidge. Dr. 
| Bavory and Moore 



FORMULA 

Brooks, T. 

piltmkino 

Fordham, W. 0., A Sons, Lin 
llllcated Carbon Filter u«. 

•XMoaa aa« 

Hay, W. (Bssenee) 
Bills. R. M., and Oo. 

ctXTja 

Grove Ohamiea) Co. 
Fordham, w. B.,and Sons 

•XiTcaaxara 

Boehm, P. 

rink sua On. [ Tnerst Bros 

Greeff, B. W.. and Co. 
Lofoden Cod Liver Oil Co. 
Prloc's Canute uw. 

mavviax »ixr. 

Bishop, A., and Sons 
Blyton. Astley ana Co. 
Curtis ana Uu. 
Hearon, Squire and Fransls 
HUL A. 8., and Son 
Kerlool, T. 

Wright, Laymat and U .nay 



Pink and Oo. (Arams, As. J 

Greeff, K. W., and Oo, 
Hyde, Nash anaOo. 
Levermore Aug., and Oo. 

XAIK PKBV. 

Ohesebrough Mnfg. Oo. 
Kdwarda and Oo. 
Truentt, H. P. (Limited) 

IIXB BSXK XITI 

Lakin, W. H. 
Bewoali ana Mason 
Oldneld, Patttnson and Oo. 
Potter and Clarke 

XIKBALISTI 

Newball and Mason 
Potter and Olarxe 

HOBXOBOPATSXa 

Aeene and Ashwoll 
Leath and Boss 
Thompson and Oaptor 
Watson and Wales 

HOSPITALS) 

London Homcejpathls 

mtpophobpmxtbb 

Duncan, Flookhart and Oo. 

Fellows 

Fletoher, Fletoher and 0», 
Symes and Oo. 
Typke and King 

nr: 



Splrone Co., The 
Toogood, W. 

xsjsacTxcxaaa 

Keating, T. 
Banloru and Oo. 
8telner ana o,, 

Tbompson, Walters, Hole and 
Oo. (Lim.) 
IXX [Seo Mabkihs Inks.] 
Bewley and Draper 
Duncan, flookhart and Oo. 

KOLA 

Christy, T., & Co. 
Thompson. M. P. 
Van Hurgau, J. 

XXXCXWV 

Tyrer. P. 



Ewen, J., and Sons 

LINSEED POULTCE 

Seabury and Johnson 

iiiaT 

Liverpool List Oo. 
Newsome, U. 
Biblnson and Sons 
Seabury and Johnson 

Xvozaxroaa 

Allen and Hanbarys 
Blyton, Astley and Oo. 
Gibson, K.,andSoao(MamtTt. 

Hill and Son 
Kerfoot, T. 
Pasoall, J. 
Balmes and Oo 
Bandall and Son 
Stern, G. and O. 
ffiriiok Bros 

X.XXSa J¥I"- 

Evans, Eons and Oo, 
idris ana uo 

KAOKZXXXs 

Beyer Preres. 

Burron»-\ a , Wsllsoms a»« Oo 

Foster. P. 

Holroyl. J., and Co. (Llm.) 
Mf-lin, C. 
Ohlsoj, A. 
P»lau and Oo. 
Shears and Son 
Werner and Pnaldertr 

KAOXTXBXA 

Andreae, Oscar, and Oo. 
Bush, W, Son aid Oo. 
Dlnneford and Oo. 
Greeff, K. W., and Oo. 
Henry, T. anu n . iu»lllisd) 
H1U and Sons, A. 8. 
Kerfoot. T. (Citrate) 
Quelch, H. O. 

f»„»hwell.O..»nd Oo.'Ottrate) 

Washlngion chemical Co. 



MALT XXTtOl, sk« . 

Allen and Hanhuryi 
Baelx, K., and Oo. 
Burroughs, Wellsoms and Oo 

(Kepler's) 
Hsaron, Squire and Franels 

Oppenhelmer Bros, and On. 
Beade Bros.and Oo.(Bisoultl) 
Wyleys and Co. 

MANICURE 

PREPARATION 

Oarmlchael, M. W. 
Dr. Paul's 
HARKINO IXXI 
Barber, G., and Oo.(Orlmson) 
Hloklsson. J. 
Marx, M. and E. 
(IOICIN11 OXS7S 
Day, Son and Hewitt (Vetert 
nary) 

Day and Sons (Veterinary) 

xcaxrrBoxi 

Al Menthol Dsoot, A. W 

Shirley, Proprietor 
Oooklns and 0" 
Evans Sons and Oo. 
Hookln, w*1i«".i «. • 
Seal' u-v and Johnson 
Thompson, Walters, Holeand 

Co. (Llm.) 
Tyrer, P. 
MBRCITSIAXa 
Puerst Brothers 
Howards and 8^"* 
May and Bakei (Limited) 

MITXTXATB* 
SPXBXTS 

Boord ana son 
Barroagh, J. 

Harvey, J. and W., and Oo. 

Jones and Oo. 

Phillips. G.. and Oo. 

Smith, S., and Oo. 
XBTHT&INX 

Bobbins. J., and Oo. 
XCZCROSCOPXUS 

Darton, P., and Oo. 

Perken, Sou and Barmtas 
MUX 

Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk 
Co. 

Nestle, H. (Condenses,. 

Mixxiro 

HAOXIXBKT 

Gardner, W. 

Wernei and Plleldsrei 

MORPHIA 

Maofarlan, J. P., and Oo. 
Bmlth, T.and H 
OILS, PAIVTB, sks« 

Hugh Higligate and Co. 
Fox. W.,and Sons 

OINTMXVT XASBB 

Burroughs, Wellcome andOo. 
Ohesebrough (Vaseline) 
Grlndley and Oo. (Petroleum 

Jellyl 

Richardson, W. II. 
iteade Bros. a. a uo. 

OPTICIAN* 

Botwrlght and Grey 
Darton, F., ana uo. 
Lancaster auj Sons 
jf erxen, Son ana KayaOBt 
Raphael and Co. 

otto or aoaa 

Pirth, H. 
Puerst rims. 
Moryoseph, A. 
Treatt, K. C. 
PAPAIN PXNKXiBa 
Kuhn. B. 

papaxwa, As. 

Burroughs, Wellcome and 0 1 

Ohassalng and Oo. 
Fletoier.FleicheraSterensoi 

Greeff, R. W., and Co. 
Newnery P. St Xonsunglnvln 
Pnrkes, G. J. R. 
Stern, 0. and U. 
Warner aad Oo. (Inilnvln) 

FXPPXXMIXT «xx 

"^"kln* and n\ 

Miller, J. and G. 

PATIBT JtCaDONr 

Armbreoht, Nelson ana Oo. 
Atkinson and Barber (Infant 

Preserv) 
Barclay and Sons (Limited' 
Beecham T. (Fills) 
Orouoh, P. B. 
Edwards and Son 
Brans, Lesoher and Webb 
Penning'" (Powders) 
Globe Ohemloal Oo. 
Goodall. Backhouse and Oo. 
Guy's Tonic 

Holloway (Pills and Olnt.) 
Laior (Phosphodyne. as.) 
Lincoln (Clarke's Mix.) 
Mar, Roberts and u«*. 
Bewoery and Sons 
Badam's Microbe KlUer Co. 
(Llm.) 

Boberts and Co. (Foreign) 
Sequah (Limited) 
Button, w., and Oo. 
Thompson, Walters, Hole and 

Oo. (Llm.) 
Yoreler, The Charles A , Co. 
Wilcox and Co. 
Wlson, A.(Buntsr's Mervlas) 



PATENT AGENTS 

Horn and Son 

Thompson, W. P., A Oo. 



VMIBT, 
FANCY aOAPS 

Bayley and Oo. 
nionaeau and Ole. 
Boehm, F 

Burroughs, Welloomeand V%t 
Ohesebrough Mnutetrtag Oc . 

Ohlswlnk Soap Oo. 

Coward, G. P. 

Durrant. Geo [Kwn, b.»ii, 

Evans, Sons and Oo. 

farina J. M. 

Firth, H. 
Ulraud Fils 

Greenslll, T. B.,and Bos 

Patrick and Co (Lain.) 
Johnaon and Oo. 
Legraud, L. 
Mann, 0. A., and Oo. 
Mourard, J, 

Newbery andSons (Berdoat*) 
Oftlnger, B. 
Pears' Soap 

Price's Paten* 0»ndle Co. 
Rlchard'on, W. H. 
iM>smarlne Manuig. Oo. 
Bouse ana Oo. 
Balnsbury, s. iLar. Water) 
Shirley, A. W 

Thompson, Walters Hoi' ACo. 
Tldruan and Son (Luc) 
Treatt, K. U. 
Truentt, H. P. (Limited) 
Warrick BrotAers 
West, T. (Okeli's Mona) 
Woollev. Sons and OolPowdei ! 
Young, U. D. 

fxxox. oa mi 

Dunn and Oo. 
Bobbins <nd Oo. 

P1TXOLEI7M 

Orindley and Co. ( JeUyt 
Hamilton and uo. (Llm.) 
Hatrick and Co.(Luciulne v 
Bnowdon. Sons and Oo.(JtU7 



PMAXt.BC. P] 

Allen and Hanbarys 
Harron, Harveys aad Oo, 

Berger, F. 
rtueum, t. 

Boetiringor, 0. P., A 8ohno 
uurgoyue, rsnroiaao. ana Cc« 
Burroughs, Wellooms A Oc. 
Ohassalng and Co. 
Dunoan. * >1 ^ckharl and Oc 
Elton nnd Co. 
Feiiowe 
Ferric and Oo. 
Pirth, II. 

Fletoher, Fletcher and Co 

Fournier, Bon andCis. 

Giles Schachi and Go. 

Greeff, it. W ., and uo. 

Green, C, aud Co. 

Hearon, soulre and Francta 

Beilgers, P. W., ft Co. 

Hewiett aud Son 

Hill, A. S„ and Son 

Hooper. B., and Co, 

Howards and Sons 

Jeyes Sanitary Compounds Co 

Jordan and Oo. 

Keith & Co. (Cone.Tinetu.rei.) 

Layng, R. 0. 

Martiuaale, W, 

May and Baker (.Limited) 

Moryoseph, A. 

Fotter aud Clarke 

Kan km add Borland 

Ricqles and Co. 

Hooerts and Uu. 

Bouthall Bros, and Btrclav 

Button, W., and Oo. 

Byrnes and Co. 

Tyrer, T., and Co. 

White, Alfred, and Sons 

Willows, Francis and Butler 

Woolley, Sone slid Co. 

Wyleys and Co. 

PXOTOOKAPXIO 

Botwrlght and Grey 
Darton. F.. and Co. 
Pallowfleld, J. 
Greeff, K. W., and Oo. 
Houghton, G., & Son (L'hcms.V 
Howards ana Son iUhemicu)e> 
Lancaster, J., and Son 
Marion and Co. 
Orme, J., and Oo. 
Ferksn. Son and Kaymsat 
Tyrer, T., and Co. 
rt nits, Alfred, and Sons 



pxu xcAoaxa-aa 

Palan, N., and Co. 
Finaar.J. W. 
Toogood. w. • noatav) 
Werner and Pfleiderer 

HUB ( Coat eel, A«,\ 

Allen and Hanburys 
Anderston Apothecaries Hull 
Beeonam, Thomas 
Blalr'a Grut PlUe 
Champigny, A., and Co. 
Bade » uuut Puis 
Bvans. Sons aad c- 
Hearon. Squire, and Francis 
Hill, A. 8., and Son 
Holloway'" Hooper's 
Jackson, W. and H. 
Lloyd, T., Howard and Cc. 
McKesson and Kobbuut 
Newbery and Soal 
Robinson's 
Wand, 8. 

Warner, W.B.and Oo.(Coalei} 
Wyleys and Oo. 



April 13, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



7 



PIASTERS 

i Eruu, Sons and Co. 
Johnson and Johuson 
Mather, W. 
Quilliauj, J., and Co. 
St. Dalmas, A. 
Heabury and Johnson 
Thompson, M. F. [Young, H 

PODOPRTLLXN,&0. 

Keith, H and Co. 
Smith, T. and II., and Co. 

POLISHING 

Beckett, S. 

Bradley at Bourdas (Albatum) 
Chancellor, C, and Co. (Stove) 
Fordham. W. B., and Sons 

(Limited) 
Oakey, John, and Sons 

fOioninrMtii 

Too rood. tB.B. Foil, rssist.) 

printim; 

Bowers Bros. 
Consm. J. R. (Glass) 
Ford, Shapland and Co. 
8UT«rlock, H. 
Towssend, J. 

PCTMILINE 

Stern. G. and G. 

QD ININE SALTS 

Andreas, Oscar and Co. 
Boehrinzer, C. F., and Sohne 
Green", R. W., and Co. 
Howards and Sons 
Kuhn. B. 

Zimmermann and Co. 



Duncan, Flockhart and Co. 
Greet R. W.,and Co. 
Oldfield, Fattinson and Co. 

RESPIRATORS 

Newbery, F., and Sons 
SACCHARIN 

Allen and llanburys 
Burroughs, Wellcome and Co, 
SALICIN 

Macfarlan and Co. 

Smith, T. and H., and Co. 

SALICYLIC ACID 

Burgoyne. Barbidge* and Co. 
Fuerst Bros. 
Zimmerman, A. and M. 

SALT 

Stern, G. and G. (Fepsalia) 
Tldman and Son 

8ALOL 

Kuhn, B. 



SAUCES, PICKLES 

Goodall, Backhouse and Co. 
Mason, O., and Co. .1.1:11. 
Tyrer, P. 

SCHOOLS, sic. 

City School of Chemistry and 

Pharmacy (Lim.) 
Liverpool School of Pharmacy 
London Homeopathic and 

Medical School 
Manchester College 
Northern School of Pharmacy 
South London Sohoul of 

Pharmacy (Lim.) 
The School of Pharmacy 
Westmiuster College 

SELTZOIENES 

Brathy and Hinchllfie . Ld.) 
British Syphon Co. 
Evaus, pons and Co. 
Geraut, B„ A Co. 
Lynch and Co. 
May, Roberts and Co. 
Thesaier.E. 

SEEDS 

Potter and Clarke 
SHEEP DIP 

Fletcher Bros, and Co. 

Jeyes Sanitary Compounds Co. 

Wllkins 

SHOP FITTERS 

Bowling and Govier 
Bygrave, J. and W. 
Evans, Sous and Co. 
Howlett, S. 
Natali, E, 
Natal! and Co. 
Poths, H., and Co. 
Treble, G., and Co. 
Yates, W. S. 

SOAP 

Ayrton and Saunders 
Bayley and Co. 
Blondeau and Co. (Vinolia) 
Bronnley, H., and Co. 
Chiswick Soap Co. 
Cook, E ., and Co. 
Ewen, J., and Sons 
Fordham, W. B., at Sons (Ld.) 
Jeyes' San itary Compounds Co. 
Lucas and Co. 
Pears' Soap 
Stern, G. and G. 

SPONGE 

Cresswell Bros. 
Evans, Sons and Co. 
Peterson, M., and Co. 

SPECTACLES 

Botwright and Grey 
Darton, F. and Co. 
Perken, Son and Rayment 
Raphael and Co. 



SPIRIT 

Boord and Son 

Burrough, J. (Pure A Mthyl.) 

Harvey, J. and \\\, and Co. 

Jones and Co. (Methyl.) 

Macnair, A., and Co. 

Phillips and Co. 

Smith. Stephen and Co. 
STAMPS (RUBBER) 

Berkley, J. 

Hickisson, J. 

Pollard. A. W. 
STARCH 

Beckett. S. 

Crltchley (Oloss) 
STOPPERS 

Austin and Co. (Sprinklers) 

Barnett and Foster 

Melin, C. 

Sunders, i [ G., and Son I 

StlpenduniiStopper uo. 
STOVES 

Clark, 8., and Co. (Lim.) 
SUOAR 

Fletcher, Fletcher and 
Stevenson 

Gibson, It. , and Sons 
SUROICAI. 

Ayrton and Saunders 

Bailey, W. H., and Son 

Barclay and Son* (Limited) 

Cocking, J. T. 

Eschmaun Bros, and Walsh 

Haywood, J. H. 

Liverpool Patent Lint Co. 

Maw, Son. & Thompson, S. 

Kobinson and Sons 

Sanitary WoodWool Co.(Lim.) 

Schutze, F. and Co. 

Thompson, Walters, Hole and 
Co. (Limited) 

Tidman and Son 

Wood, F. 

Wood, Vincent' 

SULFOnTAL 

Burroughs, Wellcome and Co. 

Greeff, R. W., and Co, 

May and Baker (Limited) 
SYPHONS 

Barnett and Foster 

Bratby and Hinchllffe (Ld.) 

British Syphon Co. 

Geraut, IS., & Co. 

Glass Lined Syphon Co.(Ld.) 

Kilner Bros. 

Theesier, E. 
SYRINuES 

Bock, O. 

De Luca, G. Y. * 

Schoenfeld, J. & J. Freres 
SYRUPS 

Fletcher, Fletcher (Liquors) 

Idrls and Co. 



TABLETS 

Corsan, J. R. (advertising) 

Gem Glass Co. (Ld.) (advrtang) 
TEA 

Bonaon's Digestive 

French and Langdule 

Gt Tower St. Tea Co. 

Walker and Dalrymplo 
THERMOMETERS 

Bailey, W.H., and Son 

Bock. O. 

Darton, F., and Co. 

Evans, .■'one and Co. 

Perkett Son and Rayment 
TILL 

Stokes, O. R. and Co. 
TINS 

Noakes,B.,andCo. 
TOBACCO, OIOARS, 
OIOAIE TTES 

Peacock, M. and R. 

Singleton and Cole (Lim.) 

Taddy and Co. 
TOILET 

Balm of Bethesda 

Hlackwell, G. u. 

Evans, Sons and Co. 

Fordham, W. B., and Sons 
(Lim.) 

Hovenden and Sons (Euxenis) 

Lloyd, A. S.(Euxesis) 

Mnmford, G. S. Quelch, H.C. 

Rowland, A., and Sons 

Trueatt, H. P. (Limited) 

Woolley, Bona and Co. 
TOOTH PASTE 

Jewsbury and Brown 

Sutton, O. and Co. (Block) 

Wilson, A. (Bunter's) 

Woods, M. (Areca) 
TRADE MARKS 

Horn St Son 
TRUSSES 

Bailey, W. H., and Son 

Col well , H. M. 

Evans, Sons & Co. 

Haywood, J. H. 

Mather, W. 

Thompson, Walters, Hole and 
Co. (Lim.) 

Wood. F. Wood, V 

URE THANE 

Howard and Sons 
VACCINATION 

Vaccine Association (Lymph) 
VALUERS AND 
TRNSFR AG-NTS 

Berdoe and Co. 

Brett, F. J. 

Crocker, G. B., A Co. 

Orridge and Co. 



VASELINE 

Chesebrouih Manufctrlng Co. 
VERMIN KILLERS 

Hauford and Hon 
Stelner and Co. 
VINOLIA 

(Superfatted Medi- 
cal and Toilet) 

Blondeau and Co. 
VETERINARY 

Day and 8odi 

Day, Son and Hewitt 

K i li man . Bona and Co 

Jame*. W. H. (BiUtera) 

sieves' Sanitary CompouniisOo. 

Lakln, W. H. 

I^earner. A. J. 

Lloyd, T., Howard and Co. 

Kook ledge, J- 

Soratts (Dogs) 

Walker, Troke and Co. 

Wyleyi and Co. 
WHOLESALE AND 

EXPRT DRGGST3 

Allen and Hanburyi 

Barron, Harveyi and Co. 

Burjroyne, Burbidnei and Co. 

Bush, W., Son and Co. 

Huih, W.,and Co. 

Clay, Dod and Co. 

Coward, O. F., & Co. 

Dakin Brother* 

Evans, Sodi and Co. 

Evana, Leather mad Webb 

Ferris and Co. 

Fox, W . , and Sons 

Goodall, Backhouse and Co. 

Harker, Stags and Morgan 

Harrington, W. and Son (Ld.> 

Hearon, Squire and Francis 

Hewlett and Son 

Hill, A. S., and Son 

HodgkiDsons.Treacher and Co 

Lof tnoufle and Saltmer 

Lloyd, T., Howard and Co. 

Macfarlan, J. F., and Co. 

Oldfield, Pattison and Co. 

Potter and Clarke 

Symesand Co. 

Thompson and Capper 

Thompson. Walters, Hole and 
Co. (Limited ) 

Walker, Troke and Co. " 

Willows, Francis and Butler 

Woolley Jas., Sons and Co. 

Wright, Layman and Umney 

Wyieys and Co. 
WINES, SPIRITS 

Armbrecht, Kelson and Co. 

Coleman and Co. (Heat and 

Durrant, G. (Orange) (Malt 

Goodall, Backhouse and Co. 

ldrifl and Co. 

Millar, A., and Co. 

Robinson, B. 



BERDOE S TRIPLE FRENCH PERFUMES 

Have been known to the trade for many years past, and their steadily increased sale is the best proof of the 
appreciation in which they are held. Notwithstanding that the prices of some brands of perfumes have been reduced. 
F. NEWBERY & SONS find i* both impossible and needless to offer any other advantages to buyers than — (1) the 
excellent quality of the Perfumes themselves, (2) their price. The object kept in view is not to produce goods 
which may be sold at a given price and leave a given margin of profit, but to produce such as shall equal Or 

surpass a given standard of quality. 



BERDOE'S TRIPLE 



Is Plain Stock Bonus of 20 oz., 10 oz., and 6 oz. 

Ess. Bouquet 

Franglpane 

Jasmin per 20 si., 

Jockey Club 
Mlllefleurs 



Mew Mown Hay 
Opoponax .. 
Patchouli .. 
Rondeletla 
Stephanotls 
Viang Ylang 



- par 10 oi., 



p«r 5 >»., 



£ i. 4. 



0 8 7 



0 4 4 



0 2 3 



The above ere the leading Essences, and to these the special 
atteation of ooitomen is asked. These who desire greater 
variety will Had ia " Kewberjr's Catalogue " a more extended list. 




'Rait TRIf l* 

A en 




FRENCH ESSENCES. 



Violets 

Wood Violet - 



" " J- per 20 «., 



White Rose, 20 oz., 9i, 10 d. ; 10 oz., 5i. Id.; 
6 ot., 2.1. Id. 



Ean de Cologne 
Lavender Water 



{P* 
»» 



per 20 oi. 

10 ., 
0 „ 



t. •. d. 

0 11 3 



0 4 4 

0 2 3 
0 12 



Berdoo's Perfumes, in Handsome Show Bottles 
tor the Counter, Rose Cut Stoppers, Vitriflod 
Opal Shield Labols with Gold) Border and Black 
Lottore, from lls.iod. each. 



ESTABLISIIKD j^.D. 1740. 



F. NEWBERY & SONS 1 & 3 KING EDWARD ST, LONDON, B.C. 

c 35 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS - MIXED PARCELS. 

Every Requisite for the Smoker in One Order. 

The following Manufacturers' racket Tobaccos supplied at their List Prices, 
OARRI ARK PAID -—Wills, Copo, Higuott, Gallaher, Taddy, Ogden, 
Phill^i piaver Murray ' Archer. Clarke, Brankston, Morris, Mitchell. 
sSKSZTrt* S«. Pace, Goodwin Duke Kinney, Kimball. Rich- 
rnond 0«vondish Company. Carroll, Lorillard, <feo. Havana, Mexican, 
Manilla Indian, and Swiss Cigars and Cheroots at Importers Prices 

Th, riaarettes of the following Firms at List Prices : — Goodwin, Allen & 
Ginter eSmb D-ik". Kimball. Au Bon Fumeur, Wills, Player, Lambert & 
But e ,' Co^e and the leading Egyptian and Turkish Hon ,es. 

BRITISH CIGARS from 4*. to 20i. per 100. All carefully selected 
and well matured. The largest and most varied stock in the United 
Kingdom to select from. 

Irish BolL Pigtail, Nailrod, Target, Cake, Ping, and all other hard 
Tebaocos ■ also Flakes, Shags. Virginias, Cut Cavendish, and every descrip- 
tion of plain and fancy Cut Tobaccos of standard quality at lowest prices. 

Tebacconists' Fancy Goods and Smokers' Sundries of every description 

Ui rnrHaae ^aid on parcels from £2 upwards to any station in the United 
Kingdom. SEiVD FOR DETAILED PRICE LISTS. 

ciTVStT fTAU ft FM V T rl S Tobacconists' Factors, Tobacco, SnufI 
MfluLMUn Ct \j\JuL, LU. \ and Cigar Manufacturers & Importer! 
Gannon Street and Fore Street. BIRMINGHAM. 

LOEFLUND'S 

MALT AMD STERILIZED MILK PRODUCTS 

Lancet " We have nothing but praise to 

bestow." 

British Medical Journal. — "Pure 
Hordeum possesses all the properties 
claimed for it." 
Chemist and Dbuogist " Pure Hor- 
deum may be relied on to contain th» 
highest attainable proportion of diastase." 




_ ._ti<iminiinHaw» . . 



KINDERMTLCH 1 Infants 

ALPINE MILK RUSKS (ground)/ foods. 

CREAM MILK, unsweetened, sterilized. 

CREMOR HORDEATU8, delicious sub- 
stitute for Cod-liver Oil. 

PURE HORDEUM (Malt Extract) ; also 
with Cod-liver Oil, Hops, Iron, Llmt, 
Quinine, and Pepsine. 

MALT EXTRACT LOZENGES. 
MUSTARD LEAVES, best and cheapest 



A^nts— ROBERT BAELZ & CO., 1^-20 St. Mary Axe, E.C 



OLEA AETHERIA SINE TERPENO 

Oils of Lemon, Orange, Angelica, Aniseed, Bergamot, 
Cassia, Caraway, Cloves, Peppermint, Juniper, 
Curacao, &c. 

TERPENELESS AND CONCENTRATED 

Of extraordinary strength and solubility, remarkably mild 
and pleasant taste, and fine bouquet. 



SOLE AGENT FOB THE UNITED KINGDOM, 

WILLIAM POPPELREUTER, MANCHESTER 



EADE'S 



CELEBRATED 



GOUT 



AND RHEUMATIC 



PILLS. 



fpHE SAFEST and MOST 

EFFECTUAL CUBE fw 

Goat, 

Rheumatism, 
Rheumatic Gout, 
Lumbago, 

Pains in the Head 
Face, and Limbs, &c. 

They require neither confinement ntr 
alteration of diet, and is no oase oan their 
effeot be injurious. 

Prepared only by GEORGE BADE, 

72 Goswell Road, London, and sold by 
all Chemists, in bottles, li, lid. ; three 
1b one, 2*. 9d. 



BY SPECIAL 
H.R.H. THE DUKE OF 
ROYAL 




APPOINTMENT TO 
CONNAUGHT AND THE 
FAMILY. 



BOURNE WATERS. 

THE PTJBEST IN ENGLAND. 



R. M. MILLS & CO., BOURNE, LINCOLNSHIRE, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

SODA, POTASH, LITHIA, AND SELTZER WATERS 

LEMONADE, AND AROMATIC GINGER ALE. 
4-dozen and 6-dozen Cases Carriage Paid. 

Special attention is invited to our manufacture of 



Each Bottle contain! an average dose of Oarbouate of Lithia — 
the reoogniseu Specific for Gout. 

THE LATEST SPECIALITY — the Celebrated Artesian Bourne Water is 
Pints and Quarts for Table Use. 

Prices and Pamphlet on application. Agents appointed. 

MESSRS. HARDY & CO., Chemists, 23 FENCHURCH STREET. 

D. WHEATLEY, 16a NORTH ADD LEY STREET. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Pages 83—35. 



86 



RANDALL'S 



BLACK CURRANT LOZENGES 



Plain Black Currant, old square 2/6 
Plain Black Currant, rough oval 2/6 
Black Currant and Ipecacuanha 2/6 
Black Currant and Tannin .. 3/ 



Black Currant Voice (-warm 

aitringent) 3/ 

Black Currant Cough Lozenges* 3/6 
•Ipecac. & Morph., strength at "B.P." 



In Bottles, I-lb., 2-lb., 4-lb., and 7-lb. Fcr Exportation, in Soldered Tins, 
•f any sire. From Edwards, London, or Saxger & Sons ; through any 
Wholesale House ; and from the Manufacturers, 

RANDALL & SON, SOUTHAMPTON, 

Who will forward Sample! by post on application. 



llto BPOWTl Cough Lozenges, 2/; 7 lbs. stamped with name free, and 

Musk Lozenges (Special), 2 6. 

y.B. — Medical Lozenges of every kind, including those of the Pharmacopoeia 
•f the Hospital for Diseases of the Throat, London, made with Black or 
Red Currant. 




April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



9 




PICKETS 



THE " WINGED LION" 

Flower & Vegetable Seeds 



In Id. Pictorial Packets, assorted to order, 
6s. per gross, on § gross cards or n 2 gross 
Special Counter Show Cases, with gold 
lettering. Cases empty, Is. each. 




TRADE MARK. 

With all orders for 6 eroaa and upwards we send free a large Descrip- 
tive Plate, Printed in Colours, varnished and mounted on rollers. This 
new and beautiful Show Card comprises representations of 50 select 
varieties, and is a handsome and artistic advertisement. We charge 
this plate Is. each when required with orders less than 6 gross. 



The " Harrison " Show Case, as here represented, made of metal 
Japanned Black, with Bronze Lettering, to hold 30 varieties, or 2 gross 
in all. Price 3s. 6d. each empty. 



BIRD SEEDS IN PACKETS 

(Winged Lion Brand). 

Put up in cardboard cases with attractive design in colours. The 
seeds are carefully selected from the finest stocks, and are free from 

all dirt and dusb. 

This combination of Bird Seeds is allcwed by the highest authorities 
to be the best obtainable for all kinds of cage birds. 



Id. packets 
2d. 
4d. 



u 

M 



PRICE. 

9s. Od. gross. 

15s. 6d. „ 

_ ... 26s. Od. „ 

Packages extra— allowed for on return. 



SEND POSTCARD FOR COMPLETE LIST OF SEEDS IN BULK 

AND IN PACKETS. 




POTTER & CLARKE, 



Wholesale Botanic Druggists, 
5, 6 & 7 RAVEN ROW, ARTILLERY LANE, 



LONDON, E.G. 



8 



10 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Aphil 18, 1891 



WARRICK 





Flower-Flavoured 

IReal Wolets, IReal IRoses, IReal Sasmtn, IReal %av>enoer Cacbous. 

3/- per lb., splendidly labelled ; 4/- per dozen Boxes, gold embossed on calf. 
18 OLD SWAN LANE, LONDON, E.C 



. BROTHERS. 



JEWSBURY St BROWN'S 



'Sued J 



ORIENTAL TOOTH PASTE. 

Thli eld -eitabl lined and laereailmgly fa vearit a Dentifrloe has beea aver llrty Yean bef ere the PablU, 
It ll warranted t» retain Ita jropertiei amd keea in gead aondltleii la amy (lima to. The arigimal and amlf 
tannine ie manufaotured aelely by 

JEWSBURY & BROWN, Chemists, MANCHESTER, 

•md li dtitlngulihable by the Trad* Hark, printed 1b red amd green, a faoilmUe »t whlea ll iuum 
Partionlar atteatien should be paid to thli guarantee of geaniaeneaa, aa numereui imitatieai are ofltrW 
■eld universally by Ohemiitt and Perfumere, at It. 6d. and 2j. 6d. 

The Trade and 8hiBjer« mpplled by the leading heugei in Loadea and eliewhere. Bllli ami She* 
Oaidt forwarded reeetat ef addreii oardi amd dlreetieai (or eaeloiure. 







THE NEW SKIN SOAP, 



'MADE ONLY BY 



BAYLEY & CO., 17 COGKSPUR ST., LONDON, 

THE SOLE AND ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS OF 

" ESS. BOUQUET " PERFUME and of the Celebrated " SPERMACETI SOAP TABLET." 



R C TREATT 



Dunster House Mincing Lane 

LONDON 



IMPOETEB OB 1 



Musk Civet Ambergris Attar -of- Rose 



ESSENTIAL OILS 




Wholesale 
end 



o. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 




WHEN STOCKING TOOTH BRUSHES 

BUY RELIABLE GOODS. 

A VALUABLE CUSTOMER 18 OFTEN LOST THROUCH PURCHASINC 
A FAULTY TOOTH BRU8H. 

We positively guarantee all our best Brushes, which can be bought 
at the same price as the ordinary common make. Send for Samples 
direct or through a Wholesale House. 





BIDWELL BROTHERS, L 



ESTABLISHED EIPTT "STIE-AIE&S., 

SPECIALISTS in the manufacture of TOILET 



PARTICULARLY SUITABLE FOR THE CHEMISTS AND DRUGGISTS' TRADE. 



INVENTORS, PATENTEES, AND MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

"SILVERDRAWN" TOOTH BRUSHES, 

Justly Celebrated for their Superior Strength and Durability. The beBt Brush in the Kingdom at the Price. Loose Hairs an 
impossibility. Hade in thirty-six different patterns and various stiffnesses of Hair; the grooves in the back are filled in with 
Silver Cement, but Red, Blue, or White Cements can be substituted if preferred. 



1 



Reg. Trade Mark No. 43601. 



THE 




Qvmwn" TOOTH BRUSH. 

^ BIDWELL'3 PATENT, No. 507. 
The perfection of a Tooth Brash ; reliable and economical— wearing twice the time of an ordinary 
made Brush. Made with Improved Unbleached White Bristles. 

The bristles are carefully selected and speoially prepared, and although while in colour are warranted all unbleached, and have 
not been subject to the fumes of brimstone (a process all other bristles undergo), thereby ensuring elasticity, strength, and 
durability. The grooves in the backs are filled in with Patent Gold Enamel, which is imperishable, and renders the Brush 
watertight, and which cannot be dissolved by any liquid, or affected by extreme climates. This great improvement also makes 
the Brash both in substance and appearance of the highest standard quality. In other Brushes the grooves are titled in with 
Red Sealing Wax or other cements, that fall or wash out, or are dissolved by the various Mouth Washes now in use. 




THEY RECOMMEND THEMSELVES AFTER A FEW TIMES USING. 




A Brash of the usual make after a few weeks' wear. 




efo Sovereign. d&o^ QUaffa)^^ 



The "Sovereign" Brush after a few weeks' wear with fair usage. 




HAIR BRUSHES IN TWO HUNDRED DIFFERENT PATTERNS, 

Varying from T/e per dozen to 70/-. 
NAIL, SHAVING, FLESH, CLOTH BRUSHES, ETC. 





39 



1- 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Ajbil IS, 1891 



This old-established and celebrated preparation for the Teeth It 
attraotlyely put up in the form of Liquid. Powder, and Paste, is now 
being largely advertised to the public 




THE 

EAU DE BOTOT 

IB THE OStT DINTIFRIOB APPROVED 

By the Academy of Medicine of Paris. 



SAMPLE BOXES, 
Containing 
Powder, Paste, & Liquid 
oer R/- do». 



Size Size Size 
Bap de Botot . .1/6, 11/9; 2/6, 20/ ; 6/, 32/9 doz 

rmvPEn. 1/, 8/6 ; 2/6, 17/ doz. 

Paste 1/, 8/6; 2/6, 17/ „ 

Of all Wholesale Houses. 

N.B. — See each Article 

has the Signature — 




OKELLS ORIGINAL 

MONA BOUQUET 



(First introduced by the late JOSEPH OKELL.) 



Registered Trade Mark, " DOUGLAS PIER." 

The most popular and best-selling Perfume in the market 
RETAIL PRICES, 1/, 1/9, 3/6, 6 ', 7/6, 10/6 per Rottle. 
ALSO 3d. SAMPLE BOTTLES. 



Shippers and Wholesale Buyers supplied on the best terms by 

THOMAS WEST, n % Vmt jo ff' MANCHESTER. 



Ry Royal nfSm .? M Letters Patent. 

THE TEETHING PADS TO SELL. 

THE "LILY" BABY COMFORTER, 

The teats arc senmless, and always retain their proper shape. 
The Child Cannot Pocsibly Imbibe An;. 
The chief feature of this invention is the free ingress and egress of air into 
and from the teat during suction. 

3d., 4d., 6d., 9d., and Is. Ketail. 

All Patterns may now be had. fitted with Marriott's New 
Patent Ring Socket. No. 17,135. 

For inserting Bone, Indiarubber. and other Rings into Teething Pads, 
Baby Comforter!, or other articles without outting the ring, which is. 
guaranteed not to break. 




FIG. / F/$. * F*G. j. r/c.v, 

New Design Jcst Our. 

The "LILY " DEWDROP. Price 6d. 

With Hard Rubber Pad one side of Ring and Blind Soft Teat at the other 

J^SttSt E. MARRIOTT & CO., HASTINGS, 

And of all Wholesale Houses. 



TURNED METAL FLASK & BOTTLE CAPS 

For Spirits, Oils, Perfumes, 
Salts, &c. 




MANUFACTURERS : 



H. G. SANDERS & SON, 

Victoria Works, Victoria Gardens, lotting Hill Gate, LONDON, W. 

Established 1820. Telegraphic Address — " COLLAPSIBLE LONDON." 

ESC H MANN BROS. & WALSH. 

Inventors and Manufacturers for the 



To be had of all Surgical 

Instrument Makers 
and Wholesale Houses. 




To be had of all Surgical 
Instrument Maters 
and Wholetale Houses. 


WCVIM SVK 


<^....,.l:^.,,., , ^VVV^VVC^ 




NOTICE. 

^Bffiy^l Any Chemist who publishes a Monthly or 
mjaKk 9 <v Annual List of Prices circulating among 
j»\ the general public will oblige Messrs. A. 
■^£*!!bM& Rowland k Sons, of 20 Hatton Garden, 
W&Bjji&mL. London, by sending a copy of last issue, and 
■ l TKMHrsWfFi sta, ' E ^ price for an advertisement of page or 
; ^PP half -page on cover. Counter Bills, Dummies, 
or Show Cards always sent on application. 


SPONGE IMPORTERS. 

M. PETERSON & CO. 

(ESTABLISHED 1870), 

75 ST. ANNE STREET, LIVERPOOL, 

FOB HOME, FOREIGN, ft COLONIAL MARKETS 



April IS, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



13 





PROMPT EXECUTION OF ORDERS. 
AYRTON & SAUNDERS 

Have great pleasure in informing their friends that they have just received a lai'ge consignment of 

HENRI FRERES' SOAPS 

And are now prepared to execute all orders promptly. 
, THE LEADING VARIETIES ARE :— 

SULPHUR CREAM SOAP - - - 
CARBOLIC AND GLYCERINE - - - 

PINE TAR, DARK 

PINE TAR, WHITE - - - - 
SWEET FLOWERS - - - - 



2/3 per dozen 



" } 3/6 per dozen 



GLYCERINE AND CUCUMBER 

OATMEAL 

COLD CREAM AND HONEY - - 
MARSHMALLOW - - - 
WATERCRESS - - - - 

TRANSPAR ENT GLYCERINE - - 

All the above Soaps are first-rate in quality, perfect in finish, and not cut in price by Grocers and 
Stores, the sale being confined to Chemists. Any Chemist who has not yet stocked this brand will most 
certainly find it well worth his while to do so. A full Sample Set of above kinds sent post free for 3/G in 
stamps or Postal Order, by the Sole Wholesale Agents" for Great Britain and Ireland, 

AYRTON & SAUNDERS, 149 DUKE STREET, LIVERPOOL. 



" } 4/ per dozen 



Postal Address — 
AYRTON & SAUNDERS, LIVERPOOL. 



Telegraphic Address — 
SUNDRIES, LIVERPOOL. 



Telephonic No. 
423. 



41 



14 



THE CHEMIST AND DRU<:<MST 



Ai'itiL 18, 1891 



WE MAKE FOR THE TRADE 



«< 



»» 



OF 



SUPERFATTED & DE-HYDRATED TOILET SOAPS 



(ACCORDING TO DR. UNNA'S SUGGESTION). 



STEAM WORKS— 34 VERULAM ST., HOcBORN, LONDON, E.C. 



H- Bi^o2srnsr3iiE~2" &c go. 

LARGEST TOOTH SOAP CQMPRES8ER3 IN THE WORLD. 

THE BEST HOUSE IN THE TRADE FOR DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, &c. 

PRICE LIST POST FREE TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD ON APPLICATION. 

TIDMAN & SON, 19 & 21 Wilson Street, LONDON, E.C. 

PROPRIETORS OF TIDMAN'S CELEBRATED SEA SALT. 

3-lb. Boxes, per dozen, 5/4 ; 7-lb. Boxes, 10/9 ; 14-lb. Boxes, 19/9 ; 28-lb. Boxes, 35/10 ; Cardboard Packets, each, 
sufficient for a bath, in Boxes of 12 Packets, 12/3 per dozen Boxes; White Linen Bags, each sufficient for a Bath, 3 dozer*. 

in a Box, 8/3 per gross. 

SPONGES, SURGICAL APPLIANCES, PERFUMERY, COSMETICS, &c, &C 

Discount 5 per cent, for cash with order, or if remitted by 15th of month following that in which goods were supplied. 
£5 orders and upwards free to any station in England, or direct port of Scotland or Ireland. 

Export Orders executed with Fidelity and Despatch. 



H. P. TRUEFITT'S 

SPECIALITIES FOR THE HAIR. 



Floral Extract, 3/6, 5/ 

10/6, 21/- 
Egg Julep, 2/-, 4/-. 
CONCENTRATED 
Egg Jnlep, 2/6, 

6/-, 10/6. 
Golden Fluid, 
10 6, 21 -. 
ETJTCURON, 
1/6. 
&c. 




Stimulating Lotion, &/• 
10/6. 

Astringent and Toni( 
Lotion, 5/-, 10/6. 
Quinine and Arnict 
Hair Wash, 3/6 
5/-, 10/6, 21/-. 
Arnica Waa>> 
3/6, 5/-, 
W * — 10/6- 



<2> * 

BRILLANTINE, 



An elegant Preparation for 

the Hair and Beard. 
Price 2/6, 3/6, 5/-, 10/6, 21/-. 



H. P. TRUEFITT'S TONIC TOOTH BRUSH 

(BY HOYAjj LETTBHS PATaNTO 

PRICE OINfE SHILLING. 

20 A is* Burlington Arcade; 13*14 Old Bond SULondoa. 

42 



Dv, ZIEMER'3 

ALEXANDRA- 
DENTIFRICE. 

Matchless for the 
Teeth, Gums, and Breath! 



Guaranteed Non- 
injurious to the 
Enamel. 



Of all 
Wholesale 




Houses. 



1/3 size 9/ 

2/' „ 15/ 

3/6 „ 24/ 
per doz. 



Show Cards Ac, 
forwarded on application 



."W.Ziemer&Co. 

143 Cannon St, j'lOyDOX, E.G. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



15 



NOTICE ! ! ! THE MOST PROFITABLE BRAND. 

THE FIRM of MARIA CLEMENTINE MARTIN, 




Of COLOGNE, having been Awarded the SPECIAL FIRST PRIZE MEDAL 

for their Celebrated 

EAU DE COLOGNE 

AT THE 

SYDNEY EXHIBITION, 1879, 

Have the pleasure to announce to the Public that they have also obtained the First Prize Medal at the 

MELBOURNE EXHIBITION, I8SO. 



They trust that the above distinctions conferred upon them by such expert judges will bo sufficient guarantee 
that the Eau de Cologne of their manufacture is, without doubt, the best. They beg to append a List 

of Prize Medals obtained at other Exhibitions : — 



LONDON, 1851. 
PARIS, 1855. 



RHENISH PROVINCES, 1852. 
LONDON, 1862. 



NEW VQRK, 1853. 
VIENNA 1873. 



The above Firm only export to England their DOUBLE Eau de Cologne, and request their Customers, in 
comparing the Prices of the different Brands, to take into consideration that the bulk of those sold with the 
white label are single (or only half strength of the Double), which enables the Makers to sell at a low price 
with great profit. If they will trouble to compare the subjoined Prices with those of any firm manufacturing 
Eau de Cologne DOUBLE, the comparison will be greatly in favour of our Brand. 



PRICE 

Duty Paid, Net. In Bond, 

No. l.-Half Shorts 8/6 .- 5/6 

No. 2 -Shorts 16/- ... 11/- 

No. 3-Shorts (finely Wickered) ... 21/3 16/6 



LIST. 

Duty Paid, Net. In Bond 

No. 4— Long Green Flasks 16/- 

No. 5— Wickered Bottles (Small)- 26/6 
No. 6.— Wickered Bottles (Medium) 53/- 



11/- 
19/3 
38/6 



No. 7— Wickered Bottles (Large) 106/- duty paid, net; 77/- in bond. 



Small Cases assorted to order (of not less than £3 value in bond) delivered free freight, less 7£ per eent. discount. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND 

C. B. MASON & CO., 

2 BEECH STREET, 



48 



1G 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



BLYTON, ASTLET&GO. 

MANUFACTURING 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTS, 

EAGLE LABORATORIES, 

MANCHESTER. 

MEDICA TED LOZEN GES, k 

PEARL COATED FILLS. 

EXTRACT OF MALT. 

COMPRESSED PELLETS 

AND 

MAG. GIT. GRAN. 

HOME & EXPORT. 



44 



April IS, 1891 




$vfc^ K Woo«|icte. 



LONDON] 



A PHIL ls'au> 



[1891. 




The Witch 
Hazel Plant. 

(Hamameli* Vir- 
<jin(ca, Linn.) 



HAZELINE. 

A Colourless Distilled Product, containing the 
volatile active principles of the Fresh Green 
Twigs and Leaves of the Witch Hazel 

{Hamamelis Virginica, Linn.). 

This preparation contains the well-known astringent, 
anodyne, and hemostatic properties of the drug in a con- 
centrated and agreeable form. Hazeline has been extensively 
employed in the treatment of haemorrhage from the nose, 
lungs, womb, rectum, and as a styptic for obstinate bleeding 
from wounds. 

The chief active principles of Witch Hazel are volatile : 
it is therefore apparent that the Tinctures 
and • Evaporated Fluid Extracts do not 
nearly represent the therapeutic value of 
the drug. Besides a small amount of 
tannin, all the active constituents are volatile, 
and are usually dissipated during the process 
of drying the drug. 

In Menorrhagia, many specialists employ 
a tampon (B., W. & Co.), saturated with 
equal parts of Glycerine and Hazeline, for 
plugging the uterus. Dr. Edis {British 
Medical Journal, vol. i., 1890) considers 
Hazeline to be a very valuable hemostatic 
in cases of uterine hemorrhage. It is 
cleanly to use, does not stain the clothing, 
and is free from the objections raised 
against the fluid extract. 

Hazeline is undoubtedly a valuable drug in the treatment 
of piles, fistula; anal fissure, ulcers, varicose reins, edematous 
surfaces, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, nasal and post-nasal catarrh, 
stomatitis, leucorrhwa, nasal polypi, $o. 

Dr. Ringer says it is useful in monorrhagia; the dose is 
two drachms twice or thrice daily. It should be given in 
dysmenorrhea. 

" The good results obtained with Hazeline are seemingly 
very general. It certainly appears to be superior to gallic 
acid or ergot." — Medical Annual, 1885-1886. 

In catarrh or cold in the head, it may be sniffed up the 
nostrils with an equal part of tepid water. 

Dose for irritated and inflamed throat and lungs, half to 
one teaspoonful occasionally. 

Hazeline supplied to the trade in 4-oz. and 1-lb. bottles at 
14*. and 42s. per dozen. 

DIALYSED IRON (Wyeth). 

B., W. & Co. 

A pure neutral solution of Peroxide of Iron in the colloid 
form. Does not iDjure the teeth or constipate. Each fluid 
ounce contains 27'68 grains. 

It is a preparation of invariable 
strength and purity, obtained by a 
procesB of Dialysation, the Iron being 
separated from its combinations by 
endosmosis, according to the law of 
diffusion of liquids. 

It affords, therefore, the very best 
[mode of administering Iron in cases 
TjTgfc / where the use of (his remedy is 
indicated. 

t the Lancet :— " It is, of its kind, a perfect 
preparation, and is often taken without difficulty when other 
forms are not well borne. It is the best antidote in cases of 
acute poisoning by arsenic." 

Supplied to the trade in J lb. and 1-lb. bottles at 27.?. and 
42s. per doz. 




R 




HAZELINE CREAM 

Is an elegant preparation, of the colour and consistence of 
cream, and combines the well-known anodyne and astringent 
properties of Hazeline with the emollient and protective 
action of " Lanoline." This preparation is considered by 
many medical practitioners to be superior to the ordinary 
cold cream of the pharmacies as an application iot Roughness 
of the Shin, Chapping, Irritation, and for Weeping Surfaces 
such as we find in Eczema, kc. 

As an application for piles, anal fissure, prolapsus ani, 
and irritable conditions of the anal membrane, Hazeline 
Cream is unsurpassed. It may be cleanly and conveniently 
applied by means of the Ward Cousins Ointment Injector. 

Hazeline Cream supplied in elegant glass jars at 14*. per 
dozen, and in 1-lb. bottles for dispensing at 5s. each. The 
Ward Cousins Ointment Injectors supplied at 36s. per dozen. 

BEEF AND IRON WINE (Burroughs). 

Highly concentrated strength-giving Tonic Food. Each 
tablespoonful represents the tonic and stimulant value of 

one ounce of good fresh beep 
with one grain of iron, in a pure 
medicinal wine, previously 
freed from tannin. 

The Lancet reports :— " This is 
a really valuable preparation, and, 
as far as we know, a novelty. 
Children, as well as adults, take 
it easily, and, as its taste is by no 
means unpleasant, it can hardly 
fail to attain great popularity." 

The British Medical Journal 
reports : — " It is a pleasant tonic 
and mild stimulant : it will be 
found useful in cases where the 
use of a blood tonic is indicated." 
Supplied to the trade in i-lb. and 1-lb. bottles at 22s. and 
42s. per dozen ; retail, 2s. 6d. and 4s. 6d. each. 

PEPSIN (Fairchild). in scales or powder. 

Possesses the highest standard of activity and permanency. 

The Pepsin prepared by the Fairchild process possesses ten 
times the proteolytic power of commercial pepsin when 
subjected to the Pharmacopoeia test— i.e., 1 grain will digest 
1,000 grains of coagulated albumen, instead of 100 grains 
only. Those pharmacists anxious to obtain a pepsin of the 
nrcatest activity for the preparation of trine, cli.rir, or solution 
'should order Fairchild's Pepsin in scales or pon der. It 
is ten limes as powerful a digestive agent, and is not more 
expensive, than ordinary commercial pepsins. 

Pepsin " Tabloids " contain each a grain of Pure Pepsin 
(Fairchilil). Pepsin, as too often given, exerts no activity, 
because without an acid. This lias been taken into account 
in making the " Tabloids," and they 
contain, in addition to PepsiD, a little 
acid with appropriate aromatics. 
They are extremely pleasant to take, 
and children eat them as readily as 
sweets. They do for the weakened 
digestive organs what they are unable 
to do for themselves. The action is 
pronounced, and the digestive assist- 
ance they give is generally immediate 

and complete. »■","> j 

Tepsin (Fairchild) supplied in scales or powder, in ^-oz. and 

1-cz bottles, at 20s. and 60s. per doz. ; retail, 2s. and 6s. each. 
Tepsin " Tabloids," in hollies of 25 and 100, at 14s. and 

42s. per doz. ; retail, Is. 6d. and 4s. 6r/. sach. 








CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE. 



45 



18 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



IMPROVED PRODUCTS— continued. 




INHALER, IMPROVED CHLORIDE OF 
AMMONIUM (Verekert). 

We have made several important improvements in this 
favourite inhaler, not the least important of which is the 
new valve, which prevents the possibility of blowing the 
water into the acid or ammonia bottles. The new style case 
is also a great advantage in protecting from breakage. 

" The vapour of Chloride 
of Ammonium removes un- 
healthy and offensive secre- 
tions, and restores the long 
diseased or weakened nasal 
and respiratory mucous mem- 
brane to a healthy state, so 
that in cases of catarrh, where 
thickening, induration, and irritation exist, a most decided 
improvement is brought about in a short time." In " throat- 
cough," pharyngeal irritation, and relaxation and weakness 
of the throat, it acts as a most effective alterative and tonic 
to the mucous membrane. 

Supplied to the Trade at 5s. each. 

DIURETIN-" KNOLL." 

The New Diuretic. 
Diuretin- " Knoll " is an easily soluble compound of 
Theobromine, in the form of a white powder, which, when 
warmed, dissolves in about half its own weight of water, no 
precipitation occurring on cooling. It acts as a powerful 
renal stimulant, and is of especial value when it is desired to 
promote diuresis in many cases of dropsy with cardiac com- 
plications, without influencing the heart's action. Diuretin- 
" Knoll " is more certain in its action, according to Doctors 
Schroeder and Gram, than either digitalis or adonidin. The 
usual dose is 15 grains. This quantity may be repeated as 
often as every four hours until its full diuretic action is 
established. 

Diuretin-" Knoll " is supplied to the trade in 1-oz. and 2-oz. 
bottles, at 4s. 4rf. per oz. For quantities of 100 oz. and 
upwards, 4s. 2d. per oz. 

THERMO ■ SAFEGUARD FEEDING 
BOTTLES. (B., W. & Co.'s Patent.) 

As a practical and scientific invention for protecting the 
lives of infants, nothing, except Fairchild's discovery of the 
pure Zymine Peptonising agents, has of late years approached 
in importance the Thermo-Safeguard Feeding Bottle. 

« The Thermo-Safeguard Feeding Bottle enables the nurse 
to ascertain at all times the tem- 
perature and quantity of the food 
given to the child. The bottle has 
a great deal to recommend it, and is 
likely to come largely into use." — 
British Medical Journal. 

" The best of all feeding bottles, 
and ought to be universally 
used." — Edinburgh Medical Journal. 

It is admirably adapted for use in predigesting with the 
Zymine Peptonising Powders (Fairchild). 

Supplied to the trade in three qualities, at 9s., 12s., and 
22s. per dozen. 






ZYMINE PEPTONISING POWDERS. 

These are so called because they produce 2>eptonc*. When- 
ever it is proposed to peptonise milk only, and that con. 

tinuously, the Zymine Peptonising 
Powders (Fairchild) * will be found 
the most convenient form to use, for 
obvious reasons. They ensure ac- 
curacy, security from deterioration, 
and extreme convenience. For 
patients away from home, travelling, 
or visiting, these advantages will be specially appreciated. 
In those cases, however, where strict economy is a matter of 
considerable moment, the plain Zymine can be used. 
Zymine (Fairchild) is supplied in three forms : — 

1. In Powder, put up in J-oz. and 
1-oz. bottles. 

2. (a) In3-grain "Tabloids," put 
up in bottles of 25 and 100. 

(b) In Compound Tabloids (of 25 
or 100 in a bottle), each containing 
Zymine, 2 grains; Bismuth Sub- 
nitrate, 3 grains ; Powdered Ipecac, 
1/10 grain. 

Dose. — One or two, an hour or so after 
eating. 

3. In Zymine Peptonising Powders in glass tubes, a dozen 
in a box, each tube containing 5 grains of Zymine and 15 
grains of Soda Bicarb., sufficing to predigest a pint of milk 
or beef- tea. 

A complete list of recipes for the preparation of peptonised 
foods is supplied with each box of the powders. 

SALOL. 

Anti-Rheumatic, Antipyretic, and Antiseptic. 
Salol is tasteless, odourless, and insoluble in the gastric 
juice. It agrees with the stomach perfectly, in this respect 
presenting a marked advantage over Salicylic acid and 
Salicylates. 

" Therapeutically, the anodyne property of Salol is exhibited 

in the cases that are rheumatic in source The first 

triumphs of Salol were won in the treatment of acute 
Rheumatism, excelling as it apparently does all other reme- 
dies in its power to abate pain and lessen fever. If all the 
conditions be propitious, by the end of the second or third 
day, fever and joint-pain and swelling will have disappeared." 

The temperature of the body has been reduced by it from 
104° Fahr. to 98° (Nenki, Lepine, &c.) Salol differs from 
many of the antiseptic antipyretics in that the rise of fever 
after the period of apyrexia is not signalised by a chill, a 
rigour, or even a pernicious cold stage. In general it may be 
asserted that Salol is free from any toxic action. 

It is said to be as useful for topical application as Iodo- 
form ; and its powerful antiseptic properties render it service- 
able in intestinal diseases of various kinds, and lately in the 
treatment of smallpox pustules, cholera, &c. 

Salol " Tabloids " (5 gr.) supplied to the trade in bottles of 
25 and 100, at 10s. and 26*. per dozen. Salol in crystals at 
Is. 3d. per oz. or 16s. lO^rf. per lb. 

PINOL DRY INHALER (B., W. & CO.) 
The medicament is volatilised by the air in its passage 
through a saturated medium, and is conveyed into the lungs 
and air passages. 

This Inhaler may be employed at 
any time without danger of catching 
cold, and conveniently carried in the 
vest pocket, charged ready for use. 
Charged with Eucalyptia, it affords quick relief in influ- 
enza, malarial fever, &o. 

Supplied to the trade at 14s. per doz. Retail, Is. 6d. each. 

• Beware of imitations of these Peptonising Powders. Always see that 
the name of FAIRCHILD is on the package, as substances of nn entirely 
different character are being sold in the market under the name of Pep- 
tonising Powders. 



BURROUGHS, WELLCOME & CO., Snow Hill Buildings, LONDON, E.C. 



Above prices subject to usual discount. 



46 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



19 



Zhc "IRepler Solution. 



ff 



LONDON] 



April 18th. 



[1891. 



(1) In giving the "Kepler Solution," Cod-liver flours with that made from one. The Kepler Extract 
Oil is taken on the same plan as butter— with of Malt is not black, contains no glucose, and does not 

It is pleas- 



How Cod-liTer Oil 
should be taken. 



another food. For who would 
prescribe butter by itself for in- 
valids, and that an hour after meals ? 

(2) It is incalculably preferable to all emulsions, 
which are impracticable and unscientific, disregard- 

ftnulsionsimpractic- ™g ** *° everv P"nciple of 

able and unscientific. dietetics ; no one ventures to pre- 
scribe butter for patients with alkalies, gums, essential 
oils, and the like, in preference to giving it with food. 




all 

mm. Mimi 



SSBnsufcio 1 WHS* 

pWith Cone«.*rniei Zttrac: .. 

barlky Mtamnin 




IBurp.oughs.Wolcome.C 




(3) Though cod-liver oil is the most digestible of 
all oils, experiments are said to have proved that in 

Plain Oil XOT fully n i ne ca8es out °* ten C0( l-li ver 
assimilated. 0 jj j g no i { u \\y assimilated, and 

is frequently voided unchanged. It is needless to 
add that under such circumstances the digestive 
apparatus is unduly tried. All this misfortune is 
impossible with the " Kepler Solution," in which the 
natural process of digestion is so closely imitated that 
the oil is readily taken up by the lacteals. 

(4) The vehicle used in the only solution of cod- 
liver oil made is the Kepler Extract, which should 
Extract of Malt the best not be confounded with imitation 

relilole for Cod-lirer , - „ 

on. products of fancy name. 

To compare a black preparation of mixed grains 
with Kepler Extract, made from unadulterated barley, 
is like comparing a bread made from all manner of 



have the taste of having stood in barrels, 
ing to the eye and as delicious as cream. The 
following verdict on the vehicle of the Kepler Solution 
tells whether or not it is the best malt preparation 
extant : — 

The Lancet : — " It is the best known and most 
largely used." 

The Medical Press and Circular : — " The most 
palatable and easily digested." 

(5) As the Kepler Malt Extract is rich in diastase, 
and therefore a promoter of digestion, and is most 

Kepler Malt Extract abundant in carbo-hydrates and 

rich In diastase, He. proteidSj an( J ^ nutr iti 0 US as Cream , 

its nutritive value is unexcelled. 

As a menstruum, and a solvent for cod-liver oil, 
it is a food which deprives the latter of its indigesti- 
bility, and also its unpleasant odour and taste. One 
physician reports : — " My patient (a consumptive) 
protested that he could not take oil. I assured him 
he could take the preparation ordered. He improved 
steadily, is out of doors, coughs but little, has re- 
gained his flesh and appetite, lost his night-sweats, 
and expects to go to work at his trado in a few days." 

The Kepler Solution is — 

(a) A most powerful fattening and strengthening 
agent. 

(b) The best roborant in bronchial troubles, 
phthisis, <fec. 

(c) The choicest form of oil for children with 
anaemia, scrofula, rickets, &c. 

(d) A most natural and effective agent for over- 
coming infantile constipation. 

(e) The purest and best of all forms of cod-liver oil 
to prescribe for dyspeptic and fastidious patients. 

•'SUMMING UP." 
TIE BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL reports :— " The 
Kepler Solution is an ideal form for the administra- 
tion of fat." 

Please note the Reduced Prices.— The " Kepler Solution" 
and Kepler Extract of Malt supplied to the Trade in J-lb. 
and li-lb. bottles, at 20.?. and 36s. per doz. Retail prices, 
2s. 6d. and 4«. each. Supplied by all Wholesale Houses 
throughout the World. 



BURROUGHS, WELLCOME & Co., Snow Hill Buildings, LONDON, E.C. 



SUBJECT TO USUAL DISCOUNT. 



47 



20 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April' 18, 1891 



THE VERDICT 

CO^FIBMED. 

THE LANCET writes (January 31, 1891) :— 

" Tlie therapeutic value of extract of malt rests not only upon 
" the presence of important food elements, as dextrin, maltose, and 
" alkaline phosphate, but on the peculiarly active substance, diastase, 
" which is concerned in converting the starch of farinaceous food 
" into the more assimilable products. The masterly researches of 
" Messrs. C. 0. Sullivan, Brown, Heron, and Morris have shown 
" that diastase is without action upon unaltered starch, or starch as 
" it occurs enclosed in the cell. As soon, however, as the cellulose 
" envelope of the granule is broken either by bruising or boiling, . 
" the starch granulose rapidly undergoes conversion or hydrolysis, 
' " even in the cold, iuto maltose and a variety of dextrin called 
" erythro-dextrin. It is some time now since we had occasion to 
"examine the well-known and much-used KEPLER EXTRACT 
" OF MALT. Messrs. Burroughs, Wellcome & Co. evidently keep 
" pace with the newest scientific facts, which every day contribute 
" towards making this kind of preparation perfect. This is shown 
" by the following analysis of a specimen which was recently 
" submitted to us. 

" One part by weight of the Extract was found to completely convert 
" in one hour at 100° F. seven times and a-half its weight of starch 
" into maltose and dextrin; in two hours at the same temperature fifteen 
" times its weight of starch; and in three hours no less than thirty times 
" its weight. Probably at a higher temperature KEPLER EXTRACT 
" OF MALT would be capable of converting a still larger quantity. 

" Moisture, 18 - 41 per cent.; solid matter (diastase, albuminoids, 
" maltose), 80*37 per cent. ; mineral matter (for the most part soluble 
"phosphate), 1'22 percent. The flavour has been further improved, 
" and the delicacy of the colour contributes largely to its attractive 
" appearance." 

THE BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL writes (March 28, 1891) :— 

••"The KEPLER MALT EXTRACT, which is highly con- 

" centrated, possesses a very high diastasic power It is 

" entirely free from chemical preservatives, the presence of which 
" would, of course, render the diastase inactive ; and it may be 
" recommended as a thoroughly sound and reliable preparation." 



The Kepler Extract of Malt and the Kepler Solution supplied to the Trade in bottles containing -J lb. aad 1£ lb. at 20.*. and 
36s. per doz. Retail, 2s. 6d. and 4.«. Supplied by all Wholesale Houses throughout the World. Sabject to usual discount. 



BURROUGHS, WELLCOME & CO., Snow Hill Buildings, LONDON, E.C. 



48 



Aprtt. IS. 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



21 



TO THE POINT. 



Soluble "Tabloids" 



CF 



LONDON] 



Compressed Drugs, 

[1891. 



APRIL 18th. 



Pharmacy has given to medicine no other method of 1 reap the results of our industry and enterprise have 

been prompted to imitate the advertisements, labels, 
and packages of our products, and also trade marks 
as far as was safe. They have not attempted to make 
better products, but their whole industry is turned to 
persuade us that they have made such. Cogito ergo sum . 
The improvements which we first discovered and pro- 
claimed to the profession were promptly recognised by 
the medical and pharmaceutical press, whose favour 

able criticisms at- 
I tracted the imi- 
1 tative attention 
of those persons 
mentioned. We 
have a special 
laboratory in our 
manufactory at 
Dartford,Kent, in 
which we prepare 
the " Tabloids " 
of Compressed 

Drugs, which are as yet unequalled in excellence by 
any imitation products whatsoever. Our experiments 
and progress towards perfection are not only of 
recent date, but have been in constant progress from 
the first introduction of Compressed Tablets and 
" Tabloids." In fact, the services of several of our 
staff of expert English pharmacists and chemists have 
been solely devoted to this work in our laboratory 
for years past. 



administering drugs equal in elegance to the Soluble 
Tabloid form, properly made. These words are 
used advisedly, for, owing to the ready recognition of 
" Tabloids " by the profession, and the consequently 
great demand for them, many inferior compressed 
goods have been put upon the market by those having 
indifferent facilities for their manufacture, — the 
resultant products reaching " the patient in a more or 
less pulverised 
condition, thus 
ensuring inaccu- 
racy of dosage 
and inelegant ap- 
pearance. The 
recommendat ion 
of such imperfect 
preparations 
being of a vari- 
able and elastic 
nature, the mind 




Bctirouohs, 'Wellcome <fc Co.'s Snow Hill Laboratories, Dartford, Kent, England. 



of the medical practitioner is gulled for the moment, 
and the subsequent discovery of defects causes both 
doctor and patient pronounced and lasting disappoint- 
ment. 

It is, we believe, due to our efforts in producing 
" Tabloids " both elegant in appearance and accurate in 
dosage that this variety of medication has become so 
popular among physicians ; and it is only of late years 
that persons, jealous of our success, and wishing to 



The following reports speak volumes as to the disintegrating properties of our products : - 

1888. 

"Those ['Tabloids'] destined for internal administration are less dense and quickly DISINTEGRATE, as Bismuth 

8ubnitrate, Manganese Dioxide, Charcoal, &c."— British Medical Journal. 

1890. 

" ' Tabloids ' of Sulphonal and other sparingly Soluble Drugs. 
"We have esamined 'Tabloids' of Compressed SuJphonal, Phenacetin, Stc, by Messrs. Burroughs, Wellcome & Co., 
Snow Hill Buildings, E.C., and And that when they are pat into water they readily break and fall to powder, which 
can be easily suspended by shaking. Placed upon the tongue, they immediately begin to soften and DISINTEGRATE. 
This specially compressed form possesses, therefore, the great advantage of permitting the subsequent absorption o 
insoluble drugs in consequence of the fine state of division into which they are reduced in the stomach. ' 
Medical Journal. 



-Bkitisii 



BURROUGHS, WELLCOME & CO., Snow Hill Buildings, LONDON, 

Will be happy to send Trial Specimens of Soluble " Tabloids" and new and complete Price List 

to Pharmacists, post free, upon request. 



E.C. 



49 



9.9. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



REMINGTON'S PHARMACY. 




2nd EDITION NOW READY. 



There is no work on modern pharmacy which deals so com- 
prehensively with the details of the pharmaceutical art and its appliances 
as this volume. Its 500 illustrations are most useful aids to the pharmacist 
in perfecting the practical work of pharmacy. — Chemist and Druggist. 



Price 21/., subject to lO per cent, discount. 



PUBLISHED BY 



BURROUGHS, WELLCOME & CO. 

SNOW HILL BUILDINGS, LONDON, E.G. 



uco f I GuuiiiiitG/iuaiutj 

WRIGHTS 

Detergena,' acting for four hours, arrested future growth." 



See Recommendatory Notice of Medical Press and Opinions of the leading Dermatologists. 

Extract from the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh :— " Experiment* 

en the Chief Disinfectants of Commerce, with a view of ascertaining their power of destroying the spores of 
the ' Anthrax Bacillus,' by a Medical Officer of Eealth and Public Analyst. A 10 per cent, solution of Liquor 
Oarbonis Detergens, acting for four hours, distinctly retarded growth of Anthrax, for the spores, whether in 
gelatin-pork or in the broth, did not commence developing for 24 hours. Undiluted Liquor 'Oarbonis 
The Practitioner of September, 1881 : — " Eczema connected with varices! 
veins of the leg— also Pruritus Scroti, Labiorum, and Ani — is best relieved by 
weak tarry lotions, one of the best of which is WrighCt Liquor Carbonit Detergerur 
P. McLkod, Colonel B.A., Inspector-G eneral ef Ordnance, Ordnance Office 
Madras, writes Sept. 10,1887 : — "I can certify that ' Liquor Oarbonis Detergens, 
has cured me of a Psoriasis of 21 years, incurred in Burmah, after every effert 
of such an able skin doctoras Sir Erasmus Wilson had failed." 

From the Medical Timet and Batettt 
Jan. 19, 1867 : — " We have more than onoe 
called attention to the value oft nil remedy 
in chronic eczema." 
From the Britiih Medical Journal, Sept. 22 



LIQUOR 



Of all Druggists, Wholesale 
and Retail, throughout Great 
Britain, Ireland, and Colonies. 

From the Lancet, Deo. 22, 1886 : — "In our hands it has been 
a most effective agent in skin diseases, especially of the chronio 
edematous class, and one class of psoriasis which had resisted 
all other kinds of treatment speedily get well under the 
application of the Liquor Carbonit Detergent. We esteem it a 
very valuable addition to our list of skin remedies." 

1871 : — " We have tested it, and can affirm its value as a detergent agent. We consider the Liquor is an article of great utility. 



Kept in itoct and told by all Druggittt ( Wholttal? and Retail) throughout the United Kingdom 
and Ooloniet. PROPRIETORS — 

W. V. WRIGHT & CO., 48 Southward Street, LONDON. 



OARBONIS 

! is ai 

DETERGENS. 



Sold by Chemists over 35 years. 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 
This Original Brand is 
Well Advertised, and Sells 
Readily. 

STOCKED BY WHOLESALE HOUSES 
Boxes, 3d., 6d., Is., Zs. 6d., and 7s. 6d. 



Mint Street Works, 

LINCOLN. 




MARION'S P HOTO SUPPLY WAREHOUSE. 

MANUFACTURERS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ^ DRY PLATES. 

Manufactory— SOUTHGATE, MIDDLESEX. 

MANUFACTURERS OF MOUNTS FOR PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Manufactory— COUBEVOIE, near PABIS. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in Hand Cameras, Studio Cameras, and Field Cameras, 

Ferro-Prussiate Paper for Copying- Plans, &c. 

Sole Agents for VOIGTLANDER'S CELEBRATED EURYSCOPE ; LENSES. 
22 & 23 SOHO SQUARE, LONDON, W. 



60 



Ap.il IS, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



529 




B8TABLISHID 1859. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICE, 42 CANNON 8TRKHT, LONDON, E.G. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 
MELBOURNE AND SYDNEY, AUSTRALASIA. 

Published every Saturday. 

■ abioription 10b. per year, payable in advance ; dating 

from the commencement of any month. 

■applied only to persons oonneoted with the Trade. 

Post free ta every country In the world, tingle ooplei 4d. eaoh. 

<Jhequee or Postal Orders should be payable to Hdwabd Ealsb, and 
orossed Mabtu's Baxk {Limited). ■ 

for Australasian subscribers the subsidiary journal, TBI Chemist ami 
Druggist of Australasia, is included. 

Supplied regularly to every member of the following Societies, who have 
ifiopted Thi Chemist and Dhcgqist as their offioial organ. 

The Pharmaceutical Association of New Zealand. 

The Pharmaceutical Sooiety of Queensland. 

The Pharmaceutical Sooiety of South Australia,. 

The Hobart Chemists' Association. 

The Iiaunceston Pharmaceutical Association. 

Otago Pharmaceutical Association. 

South African Pharmaceutical Association. 



PAGtt 

At the Counter 676 

Bankruptcy Beport 5W 

Canadian Notes 5^S 

Commentary 557 

Corner for Stndcnte 533 

Correspondenoe : — 
Pharmaceutical Etymology ; 
Tinct. Paitros ; Symbols 
.and Insignia ; Periodo- 
hydrometdyloxycbinoline ; 
Glycerine Cement— Tolui- 

dine 572 

Xlebreich's Discoveries ; Ue- 
ciorocity of Pharmaceu- 
tical Certificates ; Drug 
1 ■ nt net: ; Explosion of a 
Glass Mortar ; Outdoor 

Aporcntlcs 57? 

Dispensing Notes 574 

Legal Queries 574 , 

Miscellaneous Inquiries ... 575 

Deeds of Arrangement 594 

Editorial Notes -.— 
The Jubilee of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society 55'. 

Dr. Stevensin's Beport 553 

iTJBII.'JE OF THE PHARM.VCEU 



Editorial Notes (cont.)— page 
The American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association 554 

flooding the Produce Mar- 
kets 651 

Universal Imperial Postage 556 
Preach Pharmaceutical News.. 534 

Gazette 558 

General News 533 

Legal Reports 535 

Marriages t64 

New Companies 561 

Parliamentary 561 

Personalities 562 

Pharmaceutical Sooiety of 
Great Britain : 
Preliminary Examination .. "0 
North British Branch .... 551 
Practical Notes and Formulae.. 56 i 

Provincial Reports 631 

Shop Etymology. By Fleder.. f58 
Some Facts regarding Diabetes 563 
The Teeth in Relation to 

Health 560 

Trade Notes 8>3 

Trade Report 56 ? 

Veterinary Counter Practico ,. 676 

riCAX SOCIETY 533 



SUMMARY". 

The season for provincial associations is closing. We 
report several annual meetings, and give the names of the 
eew office- bearers. 



Our Student's Lorner competition this wetk gives a good 
example of a mixture whioh evolves sulphurous acid, nkhoajt 
there is no sulphite in it. 



Veterinary Counter Practice." has been published, 
and is in large demand. A list of wholesale houses who 
stock it will be found on page 576. 



The Notts chemists are not at all satisfied with the Phar- 
macy Bill, all hough they have resolved to support it, at the 
same time asking the Pharmaceutical Council to protect the 
trade a little more. . 



Damages to the amount of 2D0Z. have been awarded 
against a co-operative company in D iblin lor si dispensing 
error, which consisted in the substitution of solution of am- 
monia for sal volatile. 



The financial affairs of the proprietor of Moonseed Bit- 
ter?, and the Stock Exchange transactions in the shares of 
H. H. Warner & Co. (Limited), both form the subject of legal 
actions reported this week. 



The Executive of the North British Branch had a 
meeting on Wednesday, and had li r .tle public business to 
transact. They had a good talk, however, abouc whether 
they could discuss the Pnarmacy Bill or not. 



In coroners' inquests which are reported in this issue 
two coroners express opinions regarding the Poisons Sche- 
dule. One makes some pertinent remarks about carbolic 
acid, the other would like phosphorus to be placed on the 
schedule. 



The Questions set at this week's Preliminary examina- 
tion are given in this issue, and in an editorial note this 
examination is the subject of comment, arising from Dr. 
Stevenson's report, which also shows increasing failures in 
the shop subjects at the Minor examination. 



A per? ox who had tried unsuccessfully to pass the phar- 
maceutical examination three times, and had sold poisons, 
and called himself a chemist and druggist, without being 
certificated,' has been fined 20/. at the County Court at 
Newton, Devon, on the prosecution of the Pharmaceutical 
Society. 

_____ 

The Contract for the supply of drugs to the army has 
been given by the War Department to Messrs. Herrings. 
Mr. Arthur O'Connor, M.P., on whose initiative the supply of • 
such drugs has been competed for, has intimated in Parlia- 
ment that opportunity for competition has not yet been very 
widely offered. 

The Jubilee Day of the Pharmaceutical Society was not 
celebrated in the House of Commons by the second reading 
of the Pharmacy Acts Amendment Bill, as had been hoped 
would have been the case by some of its advocates. Notice 
of opposition to the Bill has been given by Mr. Hozier, M P. 
for South Lanarkshire, and the proposal for i-s second 
reading has been postponed to Wednesday, M*y 4, accord - 
ing to the journal of the House. This is ominom. " Wed- 
nesday, May 4," will not occur till 1892. 



The Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain 
attained its Jubilee on Wednesday last, April 15. We have 
taken the opportunity to give some account of its origin and 
history, and to publish an account of its principal founder, 
Jacob Bell. We have been able to obtain portraits of all its 
presidents, with one exception. These are given in our nar- 
rative. Much interest is added to our record by some 
reminiscences of Jacob Bell, which we have obtained from 
Mr. Joseph Ince, and some recolleo'ions of the meeting at 
hich the 8ociety was organised, which arc contributed by 



Mr. Jcs°ph Sidney Lescber, who was there. 



«1 



22 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



REMINGTON'S PHARMACY. 

2nd EDITION NOW READY. 

There is no work on modern pharmacy which deals so com- 
prehensively with the details of the pharmaceutical art and its appliances 
as this volume. Its 500 illustrations are most useful aids to the pharmacist 
in perfecting the practical work of pharmacy. — Chemist and Druggist. 

Price 21/-, subject to lO per cent, discount. 

PUBLISHED BY 

BURROUGHS, WELLCOME & CO. 

SNOW HILL BUILDINGS, LONDON, E.G. 
See Recommendatory Notice of Medical Press and Opinions of the leading Dermatologists. 




WRIGHTS 

Detergens,' actiag for four hours, arrested future growth." 



Extract from the Proceedings of the Hoyal Society of Edinburgh :— "Experiment! 

•n the Chief Disinfectants of Commerce, with a view of aioertaining their power of destroying the sporee of 
the ' Anthrax Bacillus, 1 by a Medical Officer of Health and Publio Analyst. A 10 per cent, solution of Liquor 
Carbonis Detergens, acting for four hours, distinctly retarded growth of Anthrax, for the spores, whether in 
gelatin-pork or in the broth, did not commence developing for 24 hours. Undiluted Liquor 'Carbonis 
The Practitioner of September, 1881 : — " Eczema connected with varices! 
veins of the leg— also Pruritus Scroti, Labiorum, and Ani — is best relieved by 
weak tarry lotions, one of the best of which is WrighCi Liquor CarbonU Detergent. 

P. McLeod, Colonel R.A., Inspector-General sf Ordnance, Ordnance Offloi 
Madras, writes Sept. 10,1887 : — "I can certify that ' Liquor Carbonis Detergens, 
has cured me of a Psoriasis of 21 years, incurred in Burmah, after every effort 
of suoh an able skin doctor as Sir Erasmus Wilson had failed." 

From the Medical Timet and Oateiii 
Jan. 19, 1867 :— " We have more than once 
oalled attention to the value oft nil remedy 
In chronic eczema." 
From the Britiih Medical Journal, Sept. 22 



LIQUOR 



Of all Druggists, Wholesale 
and Retail, throughout Great 
Britain, Ireland, and Colonies. 

From the Lancet, Deo. 22, 1886 : — " In our hands it has been 
a most effective agent in tkin diseases, especially of the ohronio 
sezemateus class, and one class of psoriasis which had resisted 
all other kinds of treatment speedily get well under the 
application of the Liquor Carbonit Detergent. We esteem it a 
very valuable addition to our list of skin remedies." 

1871 : — " We have tested it, and can affirm its value as a detergent agent. We consider the Liquor is an artiole of great utility." 



Kept in ttock and told by all Druggiitt ( Wholetale and Retail) throughout the United Kingdom 
and Ooloniet. PROPRIETORS— 

W. V. WRIGHT & CO., « Sonthwart Street, LONDON 



GARRONIS 

' is ai 

DETERGENS. 



Sold by Chemists over 35 years. 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 
This Original Brand is 
Well Advertised, and Sells 
Readily. 

STOCKED BY WHOLESALE HOUSES 
Boxes, 3d., 6d., Is., 2s. 6d., and 7s. 6d. 



Mint Street Works, 

LINCOLN. 



MARION'S P HOTO SUPPLY WAREHOUSE. 

MANUFACTURERS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC " DRY PLATES. 

Manufactory— SOUTHGATE, MIDDLESEX. 

MANUFACTURERS OF MOUNTS FOR PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Manufactory— COTTBEVOIE, near PARIS. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in Hand Cameras, Studio Cameras, and Field Cameras, 

Ferro-Prussiate Paper for Copying Plans, &c. 

Sole Agents for VO I GTL AND E R'S CELEBRATED EURYSCOPE ; LENSES. 
22 &c 23 SOHO SQUARE, LONDON, W. 



60 



Ap. 1118.1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



529 



[THE CHEMISE 

r 5 ^ 



tND DRUGGIST] 



B8TABLISHID 1869. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICE, 42 CANNON STRKBT, LONDON. B.C. 

BRANCH OFFICBS: 
MRLBOTJRNH AND STDNBT, AUSTRALASIA. 

PublUhed every Saturday, 

■absoription 10s. per year, payable in advance ; dating 

from the commencement of any month. 

■applied only to persons oonnected with the Trade. 
Post free to every country in the world, tingle oopiea id. eaoh. 

Oheqiea or Postal Orders should be payable to UnwAUD Halsi, and 

crossed Marttk's Bask {Limited). 

for Australasian subscribers the subsidiary journal, Ths Chemist and 
Druggist or Australasia, is Included. 

Supplied regularly to every member of the following Societies, who have 
adopted Thi Chemist and Druggist as their official organ. 

The Pharmaceutical Association of New Zealand. 

The Pharmaceutical Society of Queensland. 

The Pharmaceutical Society of South Australia. 

The Hobart Chemists' Association. 

The Launceston Pharmaceutical Association. 

Otago Pharmaceutical Association. 

South African Pharmaceutical Association. 



PAOR 

At the Counter 576 

Bankruptcy Report SW 

Canadian Notes 5 IS 

Commentary 557 

Comer for Students 53) 

Correspondence : — 
Pharmaceutical Etymology ; 
Tinct. Paitros ; Symbols 
And Insignia ; Periodo- 
liydrometbyloxychinollne ; 
Glycerine Cement— Tolui- 

dine 572 

Llebreich's Discoveries ; Ke- 
cinroclty of Poarm'ceu- 
tical Certificates ; Drug 
Contracts : Explosion of a 
Glass Mortar ; Outdoor 

Apprentices 57^ 

Dispensing Notes 574 

Legal Queries 574 , 

Miscellaneous Inquiries ... 575 

Deeds of Arrangement 594 

Editorial Notes :— 
The Jubilee of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society 5V. 

Dr. 8tevensin's Report 553 

tCBlLZE OF THE PHARMYCEU 



Editorial Notes (cont.) — PAGE 
Tbe American Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association 554 

flooding the Produce Mar- 
kets 65S 

Universal Imperial Postage 556 
French Pharmaceutical NewB.. 534 

Gazette 538 

General News 533 

Legal Reports 535 

Marriages t64 

New Companies 561 

Parliamentary 561 

Personalities 562 

Pharmaceutical Society ot 
Great Britain : 
Preliminary Examination .. F50 

North British Branch 551 

Practical Notes and Pormulre.. 56 i 

Provincial Reports 5.11 

Shop Etymology. By Fieder.. f58 
Some Facts regarding Diabetes 563 
The Teeth in Relation to 

Health 560 

Trade Notes ! 5P3 

Trade Reoort 66 1 

Veterinary Counter Practico .. 676 

TICAL SOCIETY 533 



Veterinary Counter Practice." has been published, 
and is in large demand. A list of wholesale houses who 
stock it will be found on page 576. 



SUMMARY. 

The season for provincial associations is closing. We 
report several annual meetings, and give the names of the 
aew office- bearers. 



Our Student's Corner competition this week gives a good 
example of a mixture which evolves sulphurous acid, nkhougt: 
there is no sulphite in it. 



The Notts chemists are not at all satisfied with the Phar- 
macy Bill, although they have resolved to support It, at the 
same time asking the Pharmaceutical Council to protect the 
trade a little more. 



Damages to the amount of 2302. have been awarded 
against a co-operative company in D iblin lor a dispensing 
error, which consisted in the substitution of solution of am- 
monia for sal volatile. 



The financial affairs of the proprietor of Moonseed Bit- 
ters, and the Stock Exchange transactions in the shares of 1 
H. H. Warner & Co. (Limited), bolh form the subject of legal 
actions reported this week. 



The Executive of the North British Branch had a. 
meeting on Wednesday, and had K'.tle public business r<> 
transact. They had a good talk, however, about whether 
they could discuss the Pnarmacy Bill or not. 



In coroners' inquests which are reported in this issue 
two coroners express opinions regarding the Poisons Sche- 
dule. One makes some pertinent remarks about carbolic 
acid, tbe other would like phosphorus to be placed on the 
schedule. 



The Questions set at this week's Preliminary examina- 
lion are given in this issue, and in an editorial note this 
examination is the subject of comment, arising from Dr. 
Stevenson's report, which also shows ingreasing failures in 
the shop subjects at the Minor examination. 



A pbr?ON who had tried unsuccessfully to pass the phar- 
maceutical examination three times, and had sold poisons, 
and called himself a chemist and druggist, without being . 
certificated,' has been fined 20/. at the County Court at 
Newton, Devon, on the prosecution of the Pharmaceutical 
Societ v. 



The Contract for the supply of drugs to the army has 
been given by the War Department to Messrs. Herrings. 
Mr. Arthur O'Connor, M.P., on whose initiative the supply of 
such drugs has been competed for, has intimated in Parlia- 
ment that opportunity for competition has not yet been very 
widely offered. 

The Jubilee Day of the Pharmaceutical Society was not 
celebrated in the House of Commons by the second reading 
of the Pharmacy Acts Amendment Bill, as had been hoped 
would have been the case by some of its advocates. Notice 
of opposition to the Bill has been given by Mr. Hozier, M P. 
for South Lanarkshire, and the proposal for i-s second 
reading has been postponed to Wednesday, M*y 4, accoro- 
ing to the journal of the House. This is ominom. " Wed- 
nesday, May 4," will not occur till 1892. 



The Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain 
attained its Jubilee on Wednesday last, April 15. We have 
taken the opportunity to give some account of its origin and 
history, and to publish an account of its principal founder, 
Jacob Bell. We have been able to obtain portraits of all its 
presidents, with one exception. These are given in our nar- 
rative. Much interest is added to our record by some 
reminiscences of Jacob Bell, which wo have obtained from 
Mr. Joseph Ince, and some recollections of the meeting at 
which the 8ociety was organised, which are contributed by 
Mr. Jcs°ph Sidney Lescher, who was there. 



530 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 





LEARN INO'pV- S l u DY'M iih i'Hr. , wuN . 




CORNER-FOR'STUDEHTS- 




l-TWASWEKIVENTAlLEO-PnOMSIRFTOSON- 



CONDUCTED BY RlCHABD J. MOSS, F.C.S., F.I.O. 



Qualitative Analysis. 

THE subject of the next exercise in qualitative analysis 
will be a mixture of three salts of common occurrence. 
The mixture is to be submitted to a thorough systematic 
examination ; its constituents are to be detected, and all 
other substances proved absent. 

Students' applications for portions of the mixture will be 
received up to Wednesday, April 22, and the samples will 
be forwarded immediately. 

Students' reports will be received np to Saturday, 
Maj r 2. Each report should contain a concise account 
of the work done, and should include a list of the constituents 
detected, distinguishing any which may be regarded as acci- 
dental impurities. 

Reports. 

The mixture of salts sent to students last month con- 
sisted of three parts of ferrous sulphate, one of nickel 
sulphate, and one of manganese sulphate. Its calculated 
composition was as follows : — 

Mm.. M 4-56 

Fe .. « _ _ „ „ 12-C9 

Ni .. - ~ .. 4-20 

SO,.. „ „ 35-52 

H,0 .» 4363 

100-00 

The mixture contained a trace of chlorine. 

There were thirty-four reports sent in, including eighteen 
in which the constituents of the mixture were correctly 
reported. 

The two chief constituents of the powder were detected 
by all our correspondents, but manganese was omitted by 
thirteen, and nickel by nine. 

Some of our correspondents obtained the first indication 
of manganese, in the preliminary examination, by heating a 
portion of the powder in a bead, or on platinum foil, with 
sodium carbonate and nitrate, when a green mass was 
obtained, mixed with a dark-coloured undissolved oxide. 
The undissolved portion consisted of the oxides of iron and 
nickel, and the green mass consisted of sodium manganate. 
This is a very delicate reaction, but it does not appear to 
have been observed by several of our contributors who tried 
the experiment. In some cases, no doubt, the presence of 
a large amount of ferric oxide prevented the student from 
noticing the green manganate. All blowpipe reactions are 
liable to such disturbing influences, and it is always neces- 
sary to bear in mind that the results obtained by such tests 
in the examination of mixtures may be very different from 
those produced by pure substances. 

In the separation of these metals by the wet method 
there was no serious difficulty to overcome. To prevent the 
precipitation of manganese by ammonium hydrate it was 
necessary to have a sufficiency of ammonium chloride pre- 
sent. If this precaution was attended to, manganese was 
thrown down afterwards as sulphide in conjunction with 
nickel, and the widely different behaviour of the two 
sulphides with dilute hydrochloric acid, admitted of a 
separation sufficiently complete for qualitative purposes. 



Prizes. 

The First Prize for the best analysis has been awarded to 
Walton Porteb, 9 Edge Hill, Whitehaven. 

The Second Prize has been awarded to 
John Smith, 91 Shaw Heath, Stockport. 

Marks Awarded for Analyses : 



Walton Porter (1st prize) . . 98 

John Smith (2nd prize') .. 98 

A. G. Hendry 94 

A.Shaw M 93 

Longatona 93 

Maybitt 92 

A. M. S 82 

A. Blowpipe 92 

Viola 90 

Minors 90 

Juvenis 89 

Cubcb 88 

A. Thorpe 88 

CoUCbicum .« .. ..87 

Heanley 88 

John 86 

W. Hood 85 



Cadarn 80 

H. Bowdcn 78 

Sisylana 76 

Incipio 74 

Secundus 7 

Verdant Green '>0 

T. Brown 70 

J. H. Hoaeason 70 

H. G. F 65 

Glycerinnm 65 

F. H. F 60 

Sapientin 55 

Tempus Fugit 55 

J.B. ' 55 

X.Y.Z. .. .. .. .. 50 

L. 0. V 40 

Cogito 40 



TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Pritet. — The students to whom prizes are awarded are requested to write 
at once to the Publisher, naming the book they select, and stating how 
they wish it forwarded. 

Any scientific book that is published at a price not greatly exceeding 
half a guinea may be taken as a first prize. 

Any scientific book which is sold for about fire shillings may be taken 
as second prize. 

Note.— All communications should include the names and addresses of the 
writers. 

Viola — It is a mistake to omit the preliminary examination, blowpipe- 
tests, action of heat, &c. ; the results are often of great assistance in the- 
subsequent more systematic part of the analysis. 

MixonE. — It is not clear that an exoess of nitrio acid was present when 
you added silver nitrate ; if not, the precipitate you obtained consisted of 
silver sulphate. 

Cubed. — The nitric-aeid solution of ammonium molybdate produces, 
with phosphorio acid, a distinctly crystalline precipitate— not merely a 
yellow colouration. This precipitate contains only 4 per cent, of phos- 
phoric anhydride, so that a small quantity of phosphoric acid yields a con- 
siderable precipitate. 

Col. Chicum. — You do not say whether any notable quantity of alumi- 
nium hydrate was precipitated. Aluminium is a common impurity in 
hydrates of the fixed alkalies. 

W. Hood. — The reactions you attributed to zinc were due to manganese 
You probably added too little sodium hydrate to the solution obtained by 
treating the sulphides with hydrochloric acid, and thus you failed to pre- 
cipitate the manganese completely. 

Cadarn.— If there was a decided excess of ammonium chloride in the 
solution to which you added ammonium hydrate, the manganese would 
have remained in solution (provided it had not been oxidised to ti e man- 
ganic state), and would afterwards have been thrown down as sulphide 
If there was not enough ammonium salt preEcnt, the manganese would 
have been precipitated with the iron. 

H. Bowten. — The use of ammonium phosphate to separate magnesium 
from the alkalies is not a good plan. When the Folution is evaporated, the- 
phosphoric acid remains, thus giving a residue even in the abeence of 
alkalies. It is better to employ either barium or calcium hydrate to pre- 
cipitate the magnesia, the excess of barium or calcium may be removed as 
carbonate. 

Sisyi.ana. — Your preliminary examination was very superficial. A 
small quantity of the powder heated in a bead of sodium carbonate, with 
a little nitrate, gave a distinct manganese reaction. 

Incipio. — The quantity of powder Bent was quite sufficient for a com- 
plete qualitative analysis. The preliminary examination in the dry way is- 
most important, and should not be omitted.' 

Sec undus.— Your report was carelessly drawn up, and was not very 
intelligible. 

Verdant Green. — If a hyposulphite had been present, sulphurous- 
anhydride would have been evolved, and sulphur separated when hydro- 
chloric acid was added to a solution of the powder. 

T. Brown.— See | remarks to " Verdant Green." Your statement that 
the barium chloride precipitate was partially decomposed by hydio- 
chloric acid Is indefinite. 

J. H. Hoseasow— The addition of hydrochloric acid to the aqueous 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



531 



solution did not result in the separation of sulphuroos acid, as it would 
tiave done in the presence of a sulphite. 

JT. G. F.— The evolution of sulphurous anhydride on heating a salt does 
not always iudicate a sulphite. For example, when ferrous sulphate is 
heated strongly, the residue that remains is ferric— not ferrous— oxide ; 
the oxidation of the iron take9 place ut the expense of part of the 
sulphuric radiole, with the production of sulpharous anhydride. It you 
repeat your tests for the chloric radicle with potassium chlorate, you will 
tind the reactions very different from what you suppose. 

Glyckrintjm. — Your name and address [should always acoompany any 
communication. 

F. H. F.— The production of a greon mass on fusing the powder with 
sodium carbonate and nitrato was quite unmistakable. 

Sai'ikntia.— You make no mention of any preliminary examination. 

Tumi'US Fdoit. — When the ammonium sulphide precipitate wastreatod 
•-vith dilute hydrochloric acid, nicktl silphlde remained, and was easily 
identified by the borax bead test. 

X. Y. Z.— You omitted to give a summary of your results. When you 
added nitric acid to the hydrochloric-acid solution you observed that it 
became yellow. This change was due to the production of ferric chloride. 
The fact of your having obtained a precipitate with ammonium carbonate 
shows that you did not use the preceding group reagents in sufficient 
quantity. 

L. 0. Y. — If an arsenate had been present the arsenic would have, been 
precipitated by sulphuretted hydrogen. 



|Jiobhui;tl Jlcports. 



Itams of news, and newspapers containing matters of interest 
to tlt£ trade, sent to the Editor will much oblige. 



BIRMINGHAM. 

Mr. Cbooke who was formerly senior partner in the firm 
of Crooke & Abraham, has become manager for Mr. Groves, 
chemist, of Walsall. 

At the next Meeting of the M.C.C.A , on April 21, a 
paper will be read, entitled " Methods for Taking Specific 
Gravities," by Mr. J. F. Liverseege, A.I.C. The paper will 
be practically illustrated. 

Messes. Evans & Co. have presented the M.C.C.A. with 
two new handsome materia medica cabinets for their library 
which will be, it is understood, available for the use of members 
and their pupils under certain conditions. The money value 
of them is about 152. 

The Preliminary Examination of the Pharmaceutical 
Society was held in this city on Tuesday last at the Midland 
Institute. There were twenty-eight candidates including 
two ladies. This is one of the largest if not the largest 
number ever known to sit for this examination in Birmingham. 
Mr. Thompson was superintendent. 

The Medical Classes of Queen's College are now all 
held in Mason's College, where for some time a part of the 
work has been carried on. The whole effects of the college 
have also been removed to Mason's College. Daring the last 
few years there has been a great increase of medical students, 
and this has rendered the present accommodation much too 
small, whilst the Queen's College authorities have no funds 
available which would permit them to carry out the neces- 
sary reconstruction. New buildings, adjoining those of 
Mason's College, and connected with them, but having also 
an independent entrance, will be erected for the school of 
medicine, and in the plans, provision will be made for the 
largely-increased number of students whom it is expected 
the enlarged facilities will attract. 



NOTTINGHAM. 

The Pharmacy Bill. — A meeting of the chemists of 
Nottingham was held at the Masonic Hall on April 8 to con- 
sider the Pharmacy Acts Amendment Bill. After an 
animated discussion, in which the Bill was well criticised, 
and the absence of measures beneficial to the trade strongly 
commented upon, the following resolutions were unani- 
mously carried : — 



( l) That this meeting heartily supports the Vharmacy Aots Amend- 
ineut Hill, but is of opinion that a strong effort should have been 
modi' to reservo the title of chemUt und druggist to those 
qualiflod by examination and registration ; and a'so that the sale 
of the compound preparations of the Fhurinacopuda shonld be 
rostrictod to registered persons. 

(This to be sent to the Pharmaceutical Society.) 

(2) That the seoretary of the N.tf.O.A be instructed to ask local 
members of Parliament to support the second reading of the 

BUI. 

(3) That this meeting requests tho council of the N.N.CA. to 
talco what steps they think best in the interests of the trade 
during the progress of the Bill. 



IRELAND. 

Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland.— The following 
candidates have successfully passed the Preliminary ex- 
amination of this body :— Messrs. S. Bogg, J. A. Stewart, 
J. A. Hogg, H. P;ior, A. H. Jones, W. E. Jolliffe, R. S. 
Moore, T. S. Taylor, A. E. Welsh, M. F. Fitzpattick, 
E. Barnes, R. Leathern, and A. Farrington. Ten 
were rejected. The undernamed gentlemen have also quali- 
fied as registered druggists: — Messrs. H. C. Backhouse, 
R. S. Chapman, T. J. Connery, J. Darcy, D. Donohoe, H. 
Farrell, J. A. Gardener, T. E. Gordon, W. Gore, B. Haydock, 
E. M. Hewetson, F. C. Judge, L. Kingsmill, J. R. Middleton, 
J. Mullen, J. J. O'Djnnell, T. H. Parker, R. H. Percy, R. 
Poole, P. C. Roche, R. E. Scarlett, W. Selkirk, W. Wade, 
R. J. Whire, and W. Willis. Of the twenty-five candidates 
not one was rejected. 

Alleged Inaccurate Dispensing. — Besides the case 
reported from Dublin under Legal Reports, in which 20CM. 
damages have been awarded to a complainant who had been 
supplied with a wrong medicine, another case has been 
mentioned in the law courts. On Friday last, in the Queen's 
Bench Division, before Mr. Justice Holmes, Mr. J. P. 
Maxwell moved, on behalf of Messrs. Harrington &. Co., 
chemists, Cork, to remit an action instituted against them 
by a Mrs. Sullivan for hearing before the Recorder of Cork. 
The action was brought to recover 1002. damages for alleged 
negligence in supplying the plaintiff with poisonous 
medicine, whereby she was incapacitated from following 
her ordinary business. The affidavit of Mr. Stanley Harring- 
ton, a director of the defendants' company, set out that the 
company had a good defence to the action. The plaintiff 
was not at any time supplied with any medicine other than 
what she asked for. The plaintiff was a vegetable-dealer in 
Cork, and had no means outside her business, the proceeds 
of which were only sufficient to maintain her. The applica- 
tion was granted. 

SCOTLAND. 
Aberdeen. 

The Aberdeen Aerated-water Cases. — The appeal 
in the case of Cameron (sanitary offioer) v. Sangster has 
been abandoned. The other two cases are down for hearing 
on April 28. 

Chemists' Assistants' Association.— The annual meet- 
ing of this association was held on April 10. The treasurer's 
report showed a balance in favour of the association. Ih.3 
following were then elected office-bearers for next session : — 
Hon. president, Mr. G. Cowie, Ph.Ch. ; president, Mr. W. 
Penny; vice-president, Mr. A. G. Milne; secretary, Mr. 
Rennie ; assistant secretary, Mr. A.Milne; treasurer, Mr. 
Forbes; members of oommittee, Messrs. Bruce, Hay, Leslie. 
Robertson, Spence, Watt. 

Dundee. 

Dr. Pirie, who trades as " P. Sandeman & Co , chemists 
and druggists." has now opened his shop in Whitehall Street, 
and has closed the one in the Pillars. The consequence is 
that Mr. Forsyth, the new lessee, cannot get possession for 
at least a month. 

Chemists' Assistants' and Apprentices' Associa- 
tion. — At a meeting of this association on Thursday, April 9, 
a lecture was delivered by Mr. John Foggie, F.C.8., University 



532 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



College, on "Toe Air we Breathe." After describing the 
gaseous constituents of the atmosphere Mr. Foggie spoke 
about the solids— viz , organic matters, dust, and micro- 
organisms. From an analysis of the air of schools it has been 
found that the number of micro-organisms present was less 
after the children had been some time in the school — this 
seeming to point to the conclusion that these bodies were 
detained by the air-passages. The cubic space allowed in 
schools for each child is, the lecturer considered, too 
small, being equal to a cube the side of which measured 
4 feet 4 inches. Numerous instances were given of the 
danger to human health through badly-ventilated buildings. 
The air of churches is often particularly objectionable in 
this respect. What Mr. Foggie characterised as a "dim 
religious smell " is very frequently to be found the result 
of the decomposition of the organic matter expelled from the 
breath and skin and the want of effective ventilation during 
the week. Numerous experiments were made in the course 
of the lecture, and at the close Mr. Foggie was awarded a 
hearty vote of thanks, which was supplemented by his being 
elected an honorary member of the association. Afterwards 
a report of the apprentices' prize essay competition was 
submitted. 

Kdinbubqh. 

The Late Mb. Raimes. — The funeral of Mr. Eichard 
Raimes, whose death from an attack of pleurisy we announced 
last week, took place at Warriston Cemetery on Monday, the 
body having been conveyed from StormontSeld, Perthshire, 
ro the family residence, Bonnington Park, Leith. There was 
a large and representative company at the funeral, including 
many Edinburgh chemists. We understand that the death 
of Mr. Raimes will make no change in the conduct of Raimes, 
Clark & Co.'s business. 

Chemists' Assistants' and Appeentioes' Association. 
— The annual business meeting was held in the Pharma- 
ceutical Society's house, 36 York Place, on the evening of 
Wednesday, April 8, at 9.15, Mr. Donald McEwan, president, 
in the chair. The treasurer's financial statement showed a 
balance of 51. 18s. 8d. The secretary's report stated that 
the membership remained as last year. The reports were 
adopted, and the following officers were elected :— Pre- 
sident, John Lothian ; vice-president, James Henry Hoseason ; 
secretary, William Beaverley C'owie ; assistant secretary, 
Alexander 0. Findlay : treasurer, Alexander J. Dey ; and as 
members of committee, Messrs. Hendry, Maclaren, Murray, 
Petrie, A. Robertson, R. Bobertson, Smith, and Weir. The 
following were also elected members of the prize com- 
mittee : — Messrs. Boa, Duncan, and McEwan. 

Glasgow. 

Assistants' Association. — The final meeting of the 
session, postponed from March 30, was held on April 9, 
when Mr. A. Kinninmont gave the closing address. The 
subject of this was " Pharmacy Acts, Past and Present," 
comprising facts within his own personal knowledge, and 
his inferences from them as to the whole course of pharma- 
ceutical legislation from 1868 onwards. Except to those 
who, like himself, had a living memory of the circumstances, 
it was impossible to conceive, he said, of the almost panic- 
stricken temper of the public mind in the 1868 decade on 
the subject of poisons ; indeed, one would have imagined 
that the entire community was in the direct danger of 
wholesale poisoning. It was in the midst of these factitious 
alarms that there arose a demand for legislation on the sub- 
ject, and two rival measures were promoted on behalf of the 
trade — the one by the Pharmaceutical Society, and the other 
by the United Society of Chemists and Druggists. It had 
been alleged then and since that the Pharmaceutical Society 
arbitrarily forced their measure on an unwilling constitu- 
ency, but this was a delusion. In reality, the Society spared 
no pains or expense to ascertain the sense of the trade ; and 
in the matter of registration, which the Government wanted 
to have optional, but which, at the instance of the Society, 
was made compulsory, the Society behaved with great 
liberality. No one had anything to pay for registration. 
Some judges and other persons, who ought to be better 
informed, had stigmatised the Act of 1868 as a clumsily- 
framed statute, but he ventured to affirm that the real 
defect alone existed in the minds of these wiseacres. As a 
matter of fact — as he could prove to them from Hansard's 



repoits of the debates on the Bill — every clause of it was 
carefully dissected and adjusted. The general doctrine of 
the Act is that every man must be qualified before starting 
business on his own account, but no one dreamed at the 
time— nor does a knowledge of the details of the making of 
the Act support the idea — that the quali6cation of the 
assistant is compulsory. The phrase "sell or keep open 
shop," in section xv., was supposed to imply a distinction 
between selling and shopkeeping ; but a reference to Han- 
sard elicited the fact that "sell or keep open shop" 
was introduced by Lord Robert Montague to obviate the 
contingency of poisonous drugs being sold on the street. 
Mr. Kinninmont then referred to the relation of surgeon- 
druggists to the Act, and how they were put right by the 
Act of 1869. He then referred to the Wheeldon case, saying 
that this was another example of monstrous perversion of 
the Act, afforded them by the decision of an English 
coiner — he thanked Heaven they had no such officious 
functionary in Scotland — which sought to impose a definition 
on the phrase " patent medicine " which was totally alien to 
the spirit, if not to the letter, of the Act. If section xvi. 
was not wildly incoherent it meant that proprietary articles 
containing scheduled poisons should be exempted from 
the other provisions of the Act, for obviously it would 
have been the merest falsity to provide an exemption for 
extra- scheduled poisons. This was the view taken by 
patent- medicine dealers at the time, and it was on that un- 
derstanding that their opposition was disarmed. In 1871 
a most vexatious measure for the regulation of the 
sale of poisons, partly promoted by the Pharmaceutical 
Society, was introduced. The Bill required a poisons 
press, special poison bottles, &c. They in Scotland would 
have been specially harassed by these restrictions, and to 
aggravate the injustice the doctors would have enjoyed com- 
plete immunity from the regulations. In Glasgow they 
hurriedly called an indignation meeting, which was held in 
the midst of one of the most terrific thunderstorms he 
ever remembered. A deputation was appointed to co- 
operate with the Edinburgh people, to go up to- 
London, and lay the protest before the Government. 
Fortunately, just at that time a new form of whisky - 
flask came into use which closely simulated the shape 
and appearance of the proposed poison - bottle, 
and the deputation collected specimens of these and lai I 
them upon the table in the committee-room of the House of 
Commons, where they seemed to produce a considerable 
impression on the committee, although they provoked the 
somewhat frequent question, " Gentlemen, were these empty 
when you started ? " The result of the opposition was weli 
known. In the remaining portion of his address Mr. Kinnin - 
mont dealt with the rise of co-operative stores ; the judicial 
decisions respecting them ; to the draft Pharmacy Bill of 1883, 
with its " Qualification of Branch Managers " clause which he 
claimed as a confirmation of his conception of the "un- 
qualified assistant " question, which he holds to be the logical 
consequences of applying the term " seller " to the assistant, 
which would subvert the entire fabric of business, and, re- 
ferring to the action of the Pharmaceutical Society in the 
Wheeldon case, Mr. Kinninmont characterised it as the 
shabbiest and most cowardly thing the Society had ever 
done. In concluding Mr. Kinninmont said he was hopeful 
that chemists would soon see daylight through most of their 
troubles. He was warmly thanked for his address. 
Thereafter the annual business meeting was held, when 
the secretary and treasurer presented their reports 
and the following gentlemen were elected to serve 
during the next session :— Hon. president, Alexander 
Kinninmont ; hon. vice-presidents, John McMillan and 
Robert McAdam ; president, James Robb ; vice-presidents, 
Alexander Laing and James Bruce ; secretary, George 
Robertson; treasurer, John Carrie; librarian, Benjamin 
Cartwright ; committee, Messrs. Abbot, Inland, Watson, 
Martin, and Crail. 

Inverness. 

Chemists' Assistants' Association. — At the meeting 
held on Tuesday Mr. Lewis Macleod gave a lecture on " The 
Testing and Stocking of Drugs." The lecture was practically 
illustrated, and in the couise of it the author reported on 
the examination of the following preparations, apparently 
purchased in the neighbourhood : — Seven samples acid. 



April 18, 1891 ] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



533 



hvdrocyan. dil., B.P., showed (1) 2 per cent., (2) 1 per cent., 
(3) 1 42 per cent, (4) 1 8% per cent., (5) 2 per cent., (6) 1 6 
per cent., and (7) 2 per cent, of HCN. Four samples ferri 
carb. saccharat. contained (1) 27 32 per cent., (2) 34-8 per 
cent., (3) 32 8 per cent., and (4) 42 3 per cent. FeC0 4 . The 
lecturer stated that he had analysed several samples pil. 
ferri (Blaud), some freshly made, others coated and kept for 
a lengthened period, and that in every case he had found 
each pill to contain fully on9 grain of ferrous carbonate. 
The results of analysis of seven samples spt. asther nit.,B.P., 
were as follows :-(l) 41, (2) 4 7, (3) 4 4, (4) 2 8, (5) 4, 
(6) 5 5, and (7) 51 vols, nitric-oxide gas. The various acids 
and alkalies were found, as a rule, to be very pure and up to 
standard strength. Liq. bismuthi was not quite satis- 
factory. To emphasise the necessity and importance of 
chemists testing their drugs before stocking, the lecturer 
stated that, some time ago, a stock of liq. bismuthi, B.P., 
was received, which, on examination, turned out to be per- 
oxide of hydrogen. 



<£>.erural |Utos. 



Wound Up.— Mr. Justice North, on Wednesday, made 
the usual order to wind up the Dae Oil Company. 

The New Italian Pharmacopeia has been promised 
many a time. Now it is stated that it will be published in 
June. 

The Pharmaceutical Examinations this month are 
exceptionally heavy, there being a "rush "of candidates 
before the new schedule comes into force in October next. 

A Chemists' Dance. — On Thursday, April 9, the members 
of the Brighton Junior Association of Pharmacy gave a 
Cinderella dance at the Royal Pavilion, which was attended 
by about 150 guests. 

No Consolation in Iodine. — Francis Freeguard, a hair- 
dresser, of Newport, Monmouth, tried to end his troubles 
with two-pennyworth of tincture of iodine last week. A few 
days in the county infirmary was the result. 

Society op Chemical Industry. — The London section 
will meet in the Chemical Society's Rooms, Burlington House, 
on Monday, April 20. The following papers will be read : — 
Mr. W P. Rix, " Stoneware and its Application to Chemical 
Apparatus " ; Dr. S. Rideal and Mr. A. P. Trotter, " Tanning 
by Jfilectricity." 

A Fire occurred on Tuesday morning on the premises in 
Waterhouse Lane, Hull, occupied by Mr. L. Foulston, 
chemists' sundryman. The fire originated amongst a quan- 
tity of cardboard boxes, and was only prevented from 
spreading to a room containing a quantity of turpentine and 
similar inflammables with the utmost difficulty. 

Liverpool Pharmaceutical Students' Society.— 
Mr. George Brimson, of 53 Hanover Street, Liverpool, has 
been elected honorary secretary to this society, in place of 
Mr. Frank Walker, who has resigned, much to the regret of 
all members. The session is to close on April 23 with a 
smoking concert at the Falcon Restaurant, 30 Lord Street. 

Dispensing in Workhouses.— The dispensing in the 
Stoke Workhouse had been done for many years, quite 
satisfactorily, by a nurse, bub lately the Local Government 
Board has required that a qualified dispenser should be em- 
ployed. At the last meeting of the Stoke Guardians the 
medical officer reported that he had engaged a qualified 
dispenser, but he pointed out that when he took the duties 
in 1879 his predecessor had explained to him how the work 
had been done in the past, and he had no idea that the 
dispensing was included in his duties. 

Death from Chloroform.— On April 10 an inquest 
was held at Darlington, before Mr. J. T. Proud, deputy 
coroner, on the body of Frederick Claude Graham Stock, 
aged 19, eldest son of Mr. W. F. K. S'.ock, Durham county 
analyst. Evidence having been tendered that deceased, who 
bad of late been indisposed, had been in the habit of taking 
chloroform, and that a 4-oz. phial of the drug, containing, 
however, only 2 J az , bad been found in the bed beside him, 
the coroner, in summing up, said from appearances an over- 



dose of chloroform had been taken inadvertently. Verdict, 
"Deah from an overdose of chloroform, taken by mis- 
adventure." 

Anxious Ji;quibie9.— A correspondent of the Comreali 
Gazette, writing from Gwennap, says a well-dressed youtg 
quack doctor has recently been in this neighbourhood, and 
several nervous people have been rather seriously frightened 
by him. He seems to push his business somewhat as fol- 
lows : — •' Good morning, madam. I have called for a medical 
card recently left with you. Are you all well ? I see, my 
dear madam, you are far from well. You are, perhaps, un» 
conscious of if, but yon are suffering from a weak heart ; at 
any moment you may drop down dead. Now, I have a box 
of pills which will do you good. Sixteen-pence a boxv 
madam. Thank you. Now, you would do well to have- 
another box — another kind of pill. Take one after dinoe&- 
from the first box to-day, and one from the second box to- 
morrow. Yes ; sixteen-pence a box, same as the first. Thank, 
you. Good day." 

Grindley & Co. (Limited). — The first annual general i 
meeting of Grindley & Co. (Limited), of Poplar, was held at 
the Great Eastern Railway Hotel, Liverpool Street, London, . 
on March 19. The chairman, Mr. J. Smart, of Stevenage, in 
moving the adoption of the report and balance-sheet, referred 
to the death of the first managing director, Mr. John Giindle \ , 
and said they had appointed their secretary, Mr. W. S. Duif, 
to be manager and secretary. Mr. Duff had been with the 
old firm many years, and had a thorough knowledge of the 
business. They had paid out of their profits the extra ex- 
penses incurred in forming the business into a limited 
company, and had also spent a considerable amount on 
renewals and repairs to plant. Out of the balance it was 
proposed to pay a dividend of 8 per cent, for the year ending 
December 31, 1890, 4 per cent, of which had already been 
paid ; also to write a further sum of 2002. off plant account, 
and, after paying directors' fees, to carry the balance f orwanl. 
The report and accounts were adopted. 

" Take all the Epsom Salts." — In the City of Lon- 
don Court on Monday, before Mr. Commissioner Kerr, the 
case of Bowles and Cross v. Swyer was heard. The plains- 
tiffs, Messrs. Bowles & Cross, of 3 Lambeth Hill, E.C., sought 
to have the defendant, Mr. Septimus Swyer, surgeon, of 
23 Whitechapel Road, committed to prison for the nonpay- 
ment of 51. 16s. lOd. due. The plaintiffs' representative said 
the defendant was in a very good position and with a good- 
practice. The defendant's representative said he was in a. 
very bad way, as he had ten judgments against him. Mr. 
Commissioner Kerr : Why do the plaintiffs not levy on his 
drugs and other things ? The Plaintiffs' representative : Can 
we do that ? Mr. Commissioner Kerr : Yes, take all the 
Epsom salts you can find in particular. (Laughter.) No 
order was therefore made on this summons, the plaintiffs to 
levy execution on the defendant's goods. 

The Sale of Rat- Poison. — At an inquest held at Poole, 
on Florence Fry, aged 17, who died at her father's house 
from the effects of phosphorus-poisoning, it appeared that 
she had bought some phosphorus- poison at the Southern 
drug stores, and Mr. Arthur Bolton, surgeon, stated that on 
a post-mortem examination, it was found that the mucous 
membrane of the stomach was eaten away in many places. 
He stated that small pots of phosphorus paste, similar to 
that purchased by deceased, and bearing the name of a 
German firm, were sold at 3d. each, and ho thought they 
could be obtained at almost any chemist's or grocer's. The 
coroner said that the Sale of Poisons Act imposed strict 
conditions as to the sale of dangerous poisons, but phosphorus 
was not included in the schedule. He thought something 
should be done to prevent the indiscriminate sale of this 
poison. The jury appended to their verdict an expression 
of regret that restrictions, similar to those in the Sale of 
Poisons Act, did not apply to the sale of phosphorus paste 
and other rat-poisons. 

WnoLESALE Arsenic Poisoning in Scotland — An 
extraordinary series of poisoning cases took place in Crieff 
during last week, more than sixty persons having been 
seriously ill. It has been discovered that a quantity of 
sugar bad become impregnated with arsenic by some means 
unknown, and, as many persons used the sutrar with tea, 
they suffered severely. An old man named t ramb and his 



534 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



wife have died from the effects of the poison, after great 
suffering. An official inquiry has been held during the past 
week, and is now all but completed. It was at first believed 
that the sugar which had been used had come from the 
Continent, but subsequent inquiry revealed that that was not 
so, and that, in point of fact, it had been refined in a 
Greenock relineiy. The affair was placed in the hands of 
two police officers, one belonging to Glasgow and the other 
to Greenock, and those gentlemen have handed in their 
report. The fact has leaked out, however, that the refiners 
of this particular consignment of sugar are not to blame for 
the condit ion in which it was found by retail customers, and 
that they are exonerated from any suspicion of using risky 
quantities of any ingredients in the process of refining that 
might prove deleterious to health. The police are very 
reticent about the matter pending the report of the com- 
mission of inquiry. We hear that a cask of weed-killer, 
which was in the same van as the sugar, leaked and the 
liquid got to the sugar. 

Cakbolic-acid Poisonings. — An inquest has been held 
at Battersea, on Joseph Burgess, aged 47, late a stone 
carver, residing at 13 St. Philip's Cottages, Queen's Boad, 
who committed suicide by taking carbolic acid on April 6. 
Mrs, Rosina Jane Burgess deposed that her husband had 
been out of work for a considerable time, and had recently 
had some trouble with regard to his son. Deceased was 
discovered sitting in an outhouse in the back yard with a 
glass and a bottle containing about a pint of carbolic acid 
lying by his side. He was groaning and foaming at the 
mouth. A doctor was sent for, who applied the stomach 
pump, but without result. The doctor said deceased must 
have taken half a tumblerful of the liquid. The coroner 
said that he thought carbolic acid should be included in the 
schedule of poisons, as otherwise it was very easy for persons 
with suicidal intentions to obtain it. The Privy Council up 
to now thought it would be prohibiting the use of a good 
disinfectant. The jury returned a verdict of " Suicide whilst 
temporarily insane." — Early on Sunday morning a man was 
found lying in Gargett's Gardens, Sunderland, apparently 
asleep, with a bottle labelled poison and which contained 
a small quantity of carbolic acid, by his side. Dr. Burns, 
the police-surgeon, applied the usual remedies, and ordered 
the man's removal to the workhouse, where he died an hour 
after admittance. The deceased, who was about 45 years of 
age, was very respectably dressed. In one of his pockets 
was found a railway-ticket from Edinburgh to Portobello, 
which bore no date. Dr. Burns said that death arose from 
carbolic acid poisoning and exposure. 

Becrudescent Influenza. — The evidence which is ac- 
cumulating as to the reappearance of influenza in our 
country is not of a very reassuring character. Disquieting 
intelligence of the ravages of the malady in American cities 
has for some little time been coming over to us, the disease 
only a few days back having been accredited with the pro- 
portions of an epidemic in New York. Now, however, Eng- 
land has been again invaded, and this, too, in more than 
one locality. In London there has been but one week since 
February ended in which influenza has not been certified as 
the direct cause of death, seventeen deaths having been 
returned during this period as primarily due to the disease, 
seven in the week ended April 4, and three in the course of 
last week. At the same time, diseases of the respiratory 
organs have claimed numbers which, if not greatly, were at 
any rate somewhat, in excess of the corrected weekly 
averages. But the matter has not ceased with the Metro- 
polis. Hull has been hit, and Birmingham, Sheffield, and 
Market Basen have all of them suffered. At Sheffield, 
indeed, the character of the malady is such as to have 
earned for it the name of "Russian influenza"; while in 
Birmingham school attendance has been greatly diminished 
and much suffering inflicted among factory workers and shop 
assistants. Yorkshire, however, seems to be the county 
chiefly affected, many of its town and villages having been 
invaded, and perhaps most hardly of all the district of 
Driffield and its surroundings, where trade is seriously inter- 
rupted and many deaths have occurred as a consequence of 
the extensive prevalence of the malady, persons attacked 
last year being again, in some cases, victims to the com- 



FBENCH PHABMACEUTICAL NEWS. 

{From our Paris Correspondent.') 



plaint. In several towns in Scotland the complaint has also 
appeared again. 



Suppression of Quackery. — The Prefect of Police has 
ordered the suppression of the quack dentists, dealers in 
medicine, &c., who frequent the numerous fairs held during 
the summer in the neighbourhood of Paris. The purging 
process has commenced with the Gingerbread Fair, now 
going on at Vincennes. 

Dentists Protest. — The members of the General As- 
sociation of French Dentists held a meeting at the Dental 
Hospital, Bue Bochechouart, last Wednesday, at which several 
speakers commented strongly on the terms of the recent law 
concerning the Practice of Medicine. General regret was 
expressed that the commission of the Chamber of Deputies 
had declined to receive a delegation of members of the 
association. It was decided to memorialise the Senate and 
to draw attention to the services rendered by the Dental 
Hospital. 

French Export Trade. — The Defence Committee of 
French Exportation held an important meeting last Saturday 
in the Hall of the Syndical Chambers, Bue de Lanery. 
Upwards of sixty syndicates were represented. A former 
Minister of Commerce, M. Locroy, was elected president of 
the meeting. The question of the new tariffs was the 
subject of discussion. On the proposition of one of the 
members, the meeting voted unanimously the opinion that, 
should the proposed tariffs be adopted, they would inevit- 
ably lead to the downfall of France and to her isolation 
from other nations. 

Phenomena of Fermentation. — In a communication 
to the Academy of Sciences, Mr. Lendet states that the 
higher alcohols are not produced by the action of yeast, but 
by microbes, which exist, and this frequently in large quan- 
tities, quite independently of the ferment. In fact, in work- 
ing sugar or maltose more of the best alcohol is produced 
when only a small quantity of yeast is used. If, on the con- 
trary, yeast is freely employed, the alcoholic fermentation is 
vigorous, at least at first. There is less waste or impurity 
with a steady and regular fermentation, such, for instance, 
as when bruised malt is added to the fermenting liquid. 

Parasitical Plants.— Mr. Chatin stated, at the last 
meeting of the Academy of Sciences, that these classes of 
plants seriously affect the sap of the trees, &c, on which 
they exist, destroying certain elements and, on the other 
hand, producing new ones. For instance, no strychnine is 
found in the "loranthin" grown on the Strychnos Nux- 
vomica, no quinine in the " botanaphora " of the cinchona ; 
and in oak mistletoe, green instead of blue tannin is found. 
On the other hand, substances are found in parasites which 
do not exist in the trees on which they are found. Thus, 
mistletoe contains lime, and the dodder produces yellow and 
red colouring matters. In the broom-rape of hemp and 
milfoil a blue colour is found ; in that of " hippocrepis," a 
rich sulphur tint, and an amethyst shade in the broom-rape 
of thyme. The mistletoe and most parasites contain fecula 
which penetrates to the fibres of the wood. In short, all 
these matters are formed by the parasitical plants them- 
selves. 

Free Medicine as a Bid to Conversion.— The whole 
of the population of the village of Monteynard, near Grenoble, 
has seceded from the Bomish Church and embraced Pro- 
testantism under peculiar circumstances. The parish priest 
was extremely popular with the members of his flock, owing 
to the fact that, having studied medicine in his younger days, 
he readily supplemented his theological teaching by some 
gratuitous practice of the healing art, of ten supplying his 
poorer parishioners with medicine also free. Unfortunately 
the reverend gentleman had, in other respects, fallen away 
from the path of virtue. For this moral delinquency he was 
removed. But on the arrival of his successor the population 
turned out and received him with volleys of stones. As a 
protest against the dismissal of the offending abb6, they 
have embraced Protestantism and have petitioned the Prefect 
of the Department for permission to use a schoolroom for 
Divine Service 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



Thb Academy of Sciknceb. — At the last meeting of 
the Academy M. Berthelot, the well-known chemist, was the 
object of special attention, it being the fortieth anniversary 
of his career as a professor. The learned perpetual secretary 
of the Academy was nominated, at the age of 23, to the post 
of Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the College of France. 
In course of the meeting M. Berthelot read a paper giving 
the result of researches by M. Henri Moissan on iodide of 
boron. This body, which is said not to have been obtained 
before, may be prepared under different circumstances, 
but especially by the action of gaseous hydriodic acid on the 
amorphous boron of Messrs. Deville and Wiihler. The 
substance obtained is hygroscopic, well crystallised, and 
colourless. It melts at 43 5°, and boils at 210°. On beiDg 
brought into contact with water, it produces a similar noise 
to that caused by a red hot irons and yields boric acid and 
hydriodic acid. 



CANADIAN NOTES. 



British Columbia Pharmacists are in hopes that they 
will get their Pharmacy Bill through this time. It is 
making good progress in the Legislature. 

Mr. W. W. Mates, of E. Hooper & Co.'s, Toronto, was, on 
the occasion of his leaving the firm to start business, enter- 
tained by his friends last month, and was presented with a 
fine diamond ring. 

Some very Serious Fires have recently occurred. Dr. 
E. S. Wilson, of Brechin, Ontario, has been entirely burnt 
out. Mr. A. M. Herring, a New Westminster, B.C., druggist, 
had a fire which completely destroyed his stock, valued at 
£25,000. Upon this he had £12,000 of insurance. 

A Remarkable Phase in Pharmacy is shown in On- 
tario by the application of two individuals to the Legislature 
asking that special Acts be passed to permit them to prac- 
tise pharmacy, in one case at Tottenham, in the other at 
Markham. Why these gentlemen have taken this round- 
about and expensive process can be conjectured. 

Nova Scotia Pharmacy has extended the hand of 
fellowship to medicine. The lecturer on pharmacy to the 
Pharmaceutical Council is to be a member of the Halifax 
Medical College Examining Board. The object of this is 
to make the college graduates eligible to become members 
of the Pharmaceutical Society without further examination. 
This does not mean that doctors cannot keep open shop ; 
they do very largely, but the new arrangement will help to 
make medical men more friendly to pharmacists. Less than 
a dozen new pharmacists are placed on the register of Nova 
Scotia yearly. 

Fertilisers. — In a recent report from the Laboratory of 
the Inland Revenue Department, Ottawa, particulars are 
given of fifty-six samples of different kinds of fertilisers, 
which the Laboratory has examined for farmers and others. 
Only two or three samples were of English origin, the bulk 
being Canadian, with some American. The fact is that there 
is comparatively little demand for fertilisers in Canada. The 
Inland Revenue Department has recently attempted to as- 
certain the extent of the fertiliser trade in Canada, but the 
returns obtained were incomplete, and can only serve as the 
foundation for an approximate estimate. The latter cannot 
be placed higher than 3,400 tons, which was the probable 
quantity of fertilisers sold in the Dominion last year. From 
this it appears that the trade is as yet in its infancy, and 
that " high farming " is still unknown in Canada. The prices 
are, on the whole, lower than in the United States, where at 
least a million tons are made use of annually. Canadian farmers 
seem to entertain a prejudice against the use of fertilisers, 
owing to the apparent high prices charged for them. Ac- 
cordingly, Mr. Thomas Macfarlane, the chief analyst, in his 
report to the department, advances explanations as to the 
properties of artificial fertilisers, and the economy of their 
use along with farm manure. 



California in 1890 disposed of 15,000,000 pounds of 
borax and 23,000 flasks of mercury, the total value of both 
being about 500,0002. 




ceutical Society of Great Britain sued Alfred Ponsford, of 
Newton, for the amount of penalties incurred by him on 
February 14 and 17 for selling poison— to wit, tincture of 
opium; and also for keeping open his shop and exhibiting 
the name or title of a chemist. The amount claimed was 
20Z., being 51. for each offence. Mr. Flux, solicitor, 
London, appeared on behalf of the Society. The de- 
fendant, in answer to his Honour, admitted being liable, 
having offended in all the cases. He said the business was 
his father's, and he had endeavoured to pass the examina- 
tion. Mr. Flux said the defendant had been previously 
summoned in 1889, but previous to the case coming on he 
paid the amount. His Honour said it seemed to him that 
he had no discretion about the penalties. Mr. Flux said the 
Society had no option but to act. The defendant : It is a 
very hard case. His Honour : I cannot help that. The de- 
fendant said he did not see why he should be summoned for 
two occasions in the same month when one was sufficient 
for the plaintiff's case. His Honour : Because you have 
transgressed the Act daily. Mr. Flux : It is a question of 
the safety of the public. His Honour said so far as the de- 
fendant might be concerned it was quite possible that the 
public might not be endangered ; but if be was at liberty 
to sell poisons, other persons might claim the right also, and 
simply say in their opinion they were competent to do it. 
That would not do ; it was not the law. The defendant : It 
is my misfortune, not my fault. I have endeavoured to 
pass. His Honour : Until you have conformed with the 
law you must not dispense poisons. I have no alternative 
but to give a verdict for the plaintiffs for the 201. claimed, 
with costs. Mr. Flux said he had to bring there a witness 
to prove the purchase, and an analyst to prove that they 
were poisons. His Honour said these costs would be allowed 
with advocate's fees. He hoped the defendant would 
try to pass the examination or cease selling these things, 
because the Society would continually sue him— and very 
properly. Mr. Flux said the first communication the defen- 
dant had from the Society was in 1884. His Honour : And 
he has been violating the statute ever since. The defendant : 
I have made three attempts, and I have passed one ex- 
amination. His Honour : Attempts to pass examinations do 
not qualify men. I made attempts to pass examinations, 
and succeeded, or I should not have been here. Many of us 
have to undergo examinations. I am very sorry indeed for 
you. 



A Mincing Lane Case. 

In the Queen's Bench Division, London, on Thursday, 
the cases of Glyn, Mills, Currie & Co. v. Seaward Brothers 
and Cole & Co. v. Seaward Brothers came before Mr. Justice 
Wills and a special jury. On the first case being called on, 
Mr. Finlay, Q.C., rose and said he was happy to be able to 
inform his lordship that in this, as well as in the following, 
case the parties had been able to arrive at an arrangement. 
He therefore asked his lordship to enter judgment in accord- 
ance with the terms of that agreement, which would be 
handed in to the officer of the court. His lordship accord- 
ingly gave judgment in accordance with the terms agreed 
upon. The terms were not stated publicly. 



536 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



fApril 18, 1891. 



The "Moonseed Bitters " Agreement. 

At the Oxford County Court on April 1, before his Honour 
Judge Sna^ge and a jury, the the case of Deacon v. Kirby, 
remitted from the High Court, was tried. Mr. Vaohell, in- 
structed by Messrs. Bradford & Co., Swindon, appeared for 
the plaintiff, and Mr. Nash represented the defendant. 

In opening the case, Mr. Vachell explained that the 
plaintiff, Mr. Hubert John Deacon, was a jeweller, of Swin- 
don, and the defendant, Mr. Samuel Kirby, a grocer, of 
Abingdon. The action was brought on a bill of exchange 
for 92/ 3s. 6d., dated August 23, 1890, payable three months 
after date. From the defence delivered in the proceedings 
of the High Court, it appeared that Kirby admitted the 
acceptance of the bill of exchange, but put the plaintiff to 
the proof of its acceptance and its time of maturity. De- 
fendant urged that if this bill had been accepted it had been 
accepted and delivered to the plaintiff as security for the 
amount of the sa'es, subsequent to such acceptance, of cer- 
tain Moonseed Bitters deposited by one Powell with the 
defendant for sale ; and, further, that it was delivered on 
the terms that it should not be presented for payment, but 
that Deacon should hold the bill, and that it should be used 
as security against the goods deposited by Powell with 
Kirby. Counsel here exhibited a bottle of Moonseed Bitters, 
which, he observed, appeared to be good for all sorts of 
complaints. A parcel of Moonseed Bitters was sent by 
Powell to Kirby, and defendant gave Mr. Powell a bill of 
exchange, dated April 8, 1890, for 100Z. The arrangement 
between Powell and defendant would have been: — "You 
take this parcel of goods; you don't pay for them now, 
bat give me a bill of exchange for 100/., and when that bill 
matures or is maturing you render to me an account of the 
Moonseed Bitters that you have sold, and then send me the 
money representing them, less a certain commission for your- 
self ; then there shall be another bill, and we shall go on 
a^ain." That was the arrangement between Powell and 
Kirby. Powell brought the bill to his client (Mr. Deacon), 
who had had certain financial dealings with Mr. Powell. His 
(counsel's) contention was that the bill came into plaintiff's 
hands perfectly innocently, and he had not the slightest idea 
of any such arrangement as he had named. Consequently 
when the bill matured, and was paid into the bank, there 
were no funds. A correspondence thereupon ensued between 
the parties' solicitors, and a second bill for 92/. 3s. 6d , which 
formed the subject of these proceedings, was given. It was 
contended, as a result of that correspondence, that Mr. 
Deacon was practically willing to put himself into the shoes, 
if counsel might say so, of Mr. Powell, and "take on" this 
arrangement. There was not, however, the slightest shadow 
of a ground for saying that Mr. Deacon ever made any such 
arrangement in reference to the bill on which plaintiff was 
now suing. 

Plaintiff was then called. He produced the bill of exchange, 
which had not been paid. 

In cross-examination by Mr. Nash, the plaintiff said he 
■had discounted about a dozen bills for Mr. Powell, who was 
the maker of Moonseed Bitters. He had brought a similar 
action against Manning under a similar bill, which was one 
of the bills that he discounted for Powell. He had partly 
"financed" Powell. Mr. Morse had also financed him, as 
had also a Mr. Butter well, of Swindon. He had no agree- 
ment with Mr. Powell as to the Moonseed Bitters. He was 
entirely in the dark as to what was going on between Kirby 
and Powell. He had jno interest whatever in Powell's busi- 
ness. He remembered new machinery being put up in 
Powell's factory at Swindon. He was not constantly at the 
factory before the bill was given, but after it was given he 
went frequently. He did not know that his money went for 
the 'purpose of Mr. Powell putting in his machinery. He 
did not know where Powell was, but he believed he had been 
subpoenaed. 

The registrar said the subpoena had befn returned. 

Plaintiff,, in further cross-examination, said he had given 
Powell an' acceptance for 200/., and the latter gave him the 
bill for 100/. as part payment. He did not know Kirby was 
agent for, the bitters. 

«*" A correspondence was put in with the object of showing 
that the defendant only gave the bill on the undertaking 
that it would not be presented unless the goods were sold, 
and that Deacon said he was willing to hold the bill and cot 



present it if defendant would give notice and send cheque 
for the amount of medicine cold. 

Defendant was called to bear out this statement, and 
Mr. Nash, addressing the jury for the defence, said he did 
not think he should be using exaggerated language if he 
characterised this transaction as a fraud and a swindle. They 
had had exposed an ingenious contrivance for turning an 
honest penny. This was the way in which it was done : " If 
you have got some patent medicines to sell go to an unsus- 
pecting tradesmen in Abingdon, induce him to become your 
agent at 25 per cent, commission, ' land ' him with 100/. 
worth of your patent medicines, and induce him to give you 
a bill for the value of these goods, promise him faithfully 
that yon will not put that bill into circulation and you will 
not present it, break your promise, discount it with some 
friend of yours, and let the gentleman to whom the bill is 
passed sue the unsuspecting tradesman at Abingdon for the 
full value of the bill, and the result is this : You have suc- 
ceeded in selling, by what they call a quick sale, 100/. worth 
of yonr patent medicines which might take years otherwise 
to dispose of, and you have left the unsuspecting tradesman 
of Abingdon a sadder but wiser man." That was the simple 
transaction. 

Mr. Vachell urged on behalf of the plaintiff that this was 
a straightforward transaction, and contended that the bill 
had been " duly accepted." 

His Honour summed up the case at length, and said the 
questions for the jury to decide were — (1) Was Deacon the 
bond fide holder for value of the 100/. (original) bill, and did 
he acquire that bill for value without notice that it was not 
intended to be negotiated or presented, but was to be held 
only as security ; and (2) if so, was the bill for 92/. odd which 
was now sued upon given by Kirby upon any condition that 
it should be held by Deacon only as security, and should not 
be presented. 

The jury retired to consider their decision, and on return- 
ing into court gave a negative reply to the first question and 
an affirmative reply to the second. 

Mr. Nash asked for judgment, upon which Mr. Vachell 
rose and submitted that there was no evidence really to go 
to the jury on the first point. Eventually his Honour gave 
judgment for the defendant with costs. 



INACCURATE DISPENSING AT CO-OPERATIVE STORES. 

At Dublin on April 10, the case of Gray r. the Junior Army 
and Navy Stores (Limited) was concluded. 'J he action was 
brought by Mr. William Gray, a retired superintendent of 
customs, now residing at Tritonville Road, Sandymount, to 
recover damages from the Junior Army and Navy Stores 
(Limited), at whose establishment in October last a pre- 
scription of Dr. Kendal Franks was compounded for Mr. 
Gray's use. The statement of claim in the action charged 
that the defendants had been negligent in the compounding, 
and that thereby the mixture compounded and supplied was 
poisonous, and that when taken by the plaintiff it nearly 
caused his death. There was no statement of defence, and 
the plaintiff having for default of such marked the usual in- 
terlocutory judgment, proceded to assess his damages, the 
amount claimed in the action being 500/. Dr. Houston, Q.C., 
and Messrs. J. A. Bynd and Charles Yates (instructed by 
Mr. Wm. Robinson) appeared for the plaintiff ; Messrs. G. 
O'Malley, Q.C., and Molyneux Barton (instructed by Mr 
J. M. Williamson) for the defendants. 

The prescription in question was given by Dr. Franks in 
July. Id was intended to have a composing effeot, as 
Mr. Gray at the time was suffering from nervousness and 
loss of sleep, brought about by domestic affliction. The 
principal ingredient in the prescription was spirits of sal 
volatile, or, as it is chemically known, aromatic spirit of 
ammonia. 

Mr. Gray, the plaintiff, who is 76 years of age, was ex- 
amined, and stated that he had in July last used the 
mixture as compounded for him at the stores with gcod 
effect: and again on a subsequent occasion bad obtained and 
used a further bottle of it. On October 20, having occasion 
for another bottle of it, he got it compounded at the stores, 
and when, at his residence late at night, he took the usual 
dose of it, he felt himself immediately burnt ins'de and almost 
choked. He suffered intensely all through the night, and 



April 18, 1891.1 THE 0HEM1ST 



next day he saw Dr. Franks, who, upon sippiDg the mixture, 
had immediately to eject it from his mouth, and said the 
ammorjia it contained was out of all proportion. For about 
a fortnight Mr. Gray was unable to take ordinary solid food, 
and his throat, which had never belore bt en delicate, had 
ever since, from the effects, been in a bad state and requir- 
ing- treatment. 

Dr. Kendal FraDks was examined, and it appeared he had 
for many years been attending members of the plaintiffs 
family, but not the plaintiff himself until July last. He 
stated the circumstances under which the prescription then 
was given, and what occurred in interviews on October 21, 
October 27, and March 18 last. Although he noticed the 
state of plaintiff's throat, it did not strike him that it was 
produced by the mixture. Mr. Gray's tongue had blisters on 
it, and the liquid which produced these blisters on the 
tongne would, if swallowed, ( affect the gullet in the same 
way. 

Miss Caroline Gray, one of the daughters of the plaintiff, 
deposed to what occurred at the time her father took the 
dose in October, and how it deprived him of the power of 
speaking and nearly suffocated him, and also gave evidence 
of his previous remarkably strong throat and constitution. 

Dr. George M. Foy was next examined, and proved the 
effects seen by the laryngoscope in Mr. Gray's throat. He 
was of opinion, from the result of his inspection, and from 
the evidence given by other witnesses, that Mr. Gray had 
suffered severely from swallowing a solution of the caustic 
alkali known as solution of ammonia. The bottle containirg 
the residue of the mixture having been brought to the store 
by Dr. Franks, and not being now foithcoming, he had to 
conclude that it contained a large excess of ammonia, and 
did not contain the mucilage which should have been in it. 
He was further of opinion — agreeing in this with the paper 
by Dr. Kendal Franks on treatment of stricture of the 
cesophagus — that although the inflammatory state of the 
gullet had apparently subsided in a fewdaysafterthetaking 
of the dose that stricture should eventually su[ ervene, and 
he described the effects and the difficulty of treating such a 
development. 

Dr. Powell was also examined. He had seen the plaintiff 
in March, and bad found him suffering from the results of 
previous acute inflammation, which he believed to have 
been caused by the swallowing of the corrosive fluid. He 
agreed with the evidence of Dr. Foy. 

Evidence having been heard for the defendants, the jury, 
after a short deliberation, assessed the damages at 2C0Z. 



Messes. Colman's Tbade Mabks. 

On Saturday, April 11, in the Chancery Division of the 
High Court, before Mr. Justice Ktkewich, an application was 
made in this case which, it was stated, was of the greatest 
importance to persons interested in trade- marks, as the 
difficulty or doubt which occasioned it extended to a very 
large class of cases. In a recent decision of the Court of 
Appeal, in reference to the Apollinaris Company's trade marks, 
some remarks had been made by the Lord Justice Fry tend- 
ing to show that where the words "trademark" were 
contained in a label or other mark in such a manner as to 
appear to refer to a particular part of the mark as being the 
essential part the registered owner may lose protection for 
the mark as a whole. The present applicants had various 
labels on the register, which contained the words " trade- 
mark." In one of them, the words were used in close 
proximity to a "bull's hnad," and it was feared, in view of 
the language of the Lord Justice, that the effect might be 
that the whole label was not protected by the registration. 
The applicants accordingly now sought the leave of the 
court that the words "trade mark" might be expunged from 
their labels. 

The Attorney General and Mr. Ingle Joyce, for the Compt- 
roller of Trade- Marks', submitted that the applicants should 
explicitly state what they cUimed as the essential parts of 
their trade- marks, and disclaim all right to any added matter. 
The words "trade-mark" as used upon the labels in effect 
informed the public that a certain part of the label was 
regarded as essential, and if those words were removed it 
was only right that something Bhould be put on record 
which would inform the public which parts of the mark they 
might take, and which they might not take. 



AND DRUGGIST. 



Mr. Cozens- Hardy, for the applicants, submitted that no 
such terms ought to be imposed, as the law at the timewlu-n 
the registration was effected did not include any such 
requirement. 

Mr. Justice Ktkewich faid that if the matter had been 
strongly contested on the part of the Comptroller, he would 
have been indisposed to allow any alteration at all. Quite 
apart from what the Lord Justice Fry had said, it appeared 
to be clear that the applicants had on their registered tradi- 
mark suggested that the bull's head was one of the essential 
pans of their mark, and his lordship thought they had done 
more — they had in efftct stated that the bull's head was that 
without which the trade-mark was not, and that the other 
essential parts by themselves would not give tbem sufficient 
protection. It appeared to him that the suggestion of the 
Attorney-General was required to meet the justice of the 
case. The order would be that the application be granted 
on the undertaking of the applicants to endorse on their 
application and enter on the register a statement of the 
essential particulars of each mark, and a disclaimer of the 
exclusive right to the added matter, if any, to the satisfac- 
tion of the Comptroller, with liberty to apply again to the 
court in reference to the matter. 



Is a Shopman a "Wobkman"? 

A cafe came before Justices Grantham and Smith on 
Saturday last in the Queen's Bench Division, in which a 
grocer's assistanr, who had been fined 80s by magistrates 
for leaving his employment undtr the Masters and Servants 
Act, 1875, appealed against the conviction. The question in 
the case was whether the assistant was a workman or 
journeyman, or a person "otherwise engaged in manual 
labour " within the meaning of the Act. Jn the business in 
which the assistant was employed a porter was kept to do 
the outdoor heavy work, and the appellant was engaged " in 
the ordinary duties of a shop, principally, if not exclusively, 
in serviog- customers." It appeared from the arguments 
that a railway goods guard and an omnibus conductor had 
been ruled out of the Act, but that a " journeyman butcher " 
had been included in it. Jn this case Mr. Justice Grantham 
held that the assistant came within the Act, but Mr. Justice 
Smi'h considered that he was not included. The effect of 
this difference of opinion is that the conviction stands. 



Wabner's Safe Cube. — The Stock Exchange 
Opkbations. 

In the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court of 
Justice on Monday and Tuesday, the case of Salaman <•. 
Warner and others came before Justices Day and Lawrance, 
sitting as a divisional court. Plaintiff claimed 7,250£. as 
damages for losses sustained owing to the alleged fraud, 
conspiracy, and wrongful acts of the defendants in connec- 
tion with H. H. Warner & Co. (Limited), and the question 
for the decision of the court was whether upon the facts s-_t 
out in the statement of claim there was any cause of action 
against the defendants or either of them. 

Mr. Finlay, Q.C., Mr. Moulton, Q.C , Mr. Chitty, and Mr. 
M. C. Kenna, appeared for the plaintiff ; the Attorney-Geneial 
(Sir Richard Webster, Q.C), Mr. Abraham, and Mr. G. H. 
Mallinson, for Mr. H. S. Foster; the Solicitor-General (sir 
Edward Clarke, Q C), Mr. Cock, Q.C, and Mr. Lawrence 
for Mr. Warner; and Sir Charles Russtll, Q.C, and Mr. 
Henry Sutton for Messrs. James and Edward F. Coates. 

The plaintiff's statement of claim set out that in and prior 
to the year 1889 the defendant H. H. Warner carried on at, 
Rochester, New York, a business which consisted mainly in 
the manufacture of certain proprie'ary preparations. The 
defendants Coates were members of the London Stock 
Exchange and the defendant Foster was the managing 
director of the London & Colonial Finance Corporation, 
(Limited), which was formed for the purposo of promoting 
joint stock companies. About November, 1889, the defend- 
ants agreed to promote a company for the purpose of 
aoquiring the business of Mr. H. H. Warner, and a company 
was subsequently formed under the title of II. H. Warner 
& Co. (Limited), the purchase- money being 700,000/. in cash 
and shares. The plaintiff alleged that in order to increase 
the profits to be made by them in connection with the forma- 



538 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18. 1891. 



tion of the company, the defendants conspired together to 
make large purchases of shares in the company, so that ihey 
would be able to control the allotment, and to hold the bulk 
of the shares in their own hands so that persons who should 
contract to sell such shares would be unable to obtain shares 
to enable them to fulfil their contracts either by subscription 
or purchase in the open market and would be compelled to 
purchase such shares from the defendants at any price they 
might choose to fix. In order to succeed in that conspiracy 
it was absolutely necessary to lead the public to believe that 
the bulk of the shares in the company were to be offered 
and allotted to the public on subscription, and were not to 
be retained by the vendor or promoters. Accordingly it 
was stated in the prospectus by the defendants that the 
whole of the shares and debentures (other than one-third, 
which formed part oE the purchase consideration) were 
offered for public subscription at par. It was also stated 
that it was intended to apply for a Stock Exchange quota- 
tion in due course. The plaintiff, on the faith of the state- 
ments in the prospectus, was induced to believe that the 
shares were actually offered for public subscription, and 
would be allotted to them on application. The defendants 
then proceeded to make, through their brokers, large pur- 
chases of shares in the market, knowing at the time that it 
would be impossible for those selling to perform their con- 
tracts. By reason of the deceits practised by the defend- 
ants, the public were wholly unaware that the bulk of the 
shares had been allotted to the defendants, and were in the 
belief that the directors would allot the same in accordance 
with the statements in the prospectus. The defendants 
were, the plaintiff alleged, thus able to compel a person who 
had contracted to sell shares in the company to purchase 
such shares from defendants at such prices as they might 
choose to fix. It was further stated that the defendants 
caused a settling-day to be applied for, and that in order to 
procure the same they caused a false and fraudulent state- 
ment to be made to the committee of the Stock Exchange 
as to the number of shares allotted to the public. The 
plaintiff was one of the persons who was induced to make 
contracts for the sale of shares prior to settling-day ; but in 
consequence of what the defendants had done he was un- 
able to complete the contracts, and was obliged to purchase 
shares at exaggerated prices. 

The main defence in the action was one filed by Messrs. 
Coates who denied conspiracy or fraud, and said they were 
parties to the issuing of the prospectus as brokers to the 
company. They admitted that the granting of a Stock 
Exchange quotation depended upon at least two' thirds of 
the shares being bond fide allotted to the public, and this they 
stated was done. They further said that the company was 
promoted and the shares allotted in a proper manner, and 
without any intention to defraud or injure the plaintiff. 
They denied that a settling-day was obtained by means of 
false or fraudulent representations, or that the plaintiff 
entered into contracts for the sale of shares through any 
representations made by them. Farther, that such con- 
tracts were not bond-fide contracts for the sale of shares, but 
were made in respect of shares which the plaintiff never 
possessed, and which he never intended to acquire. They 
contended that the contracts were in effect gaming or 
wagering transactions, and wholly illegal, and were entered 
into by the plaintiff for the purpose of a scheme formed by 
him to depreciate the value of the shares in the company, 
and to defraud the holders by pretending to make large 
sales of shares at prices far below their real value. The 
defendants, therefore, contended that the plaintiff ought not 
to be allowed to maintain the action. 

Their lordships, after a lengthy hearing, decided that none 
of the legal rights of the plaintiff had been infringed, and they 
could not come to the conclusion that he had shown any 
cause of action. 

Judgment accordingly. 



Electric Supply. — An Action p.y Savoey & Moobe. 

Mb. Justice Kekewich. sitting in the Chancery Divi- 
sion of the High Court of Justice, on Wednesday, resumed 
the hearing of the action brought by Messrs. Savory & 
Moore, wholesale, dispensing, and manufacturing chemists, 
who carry on their business in Bond Street, for an injunction 
to restrain the London Electric Supply Corporation (Limited) 



from so carrying on their business as to be a nuisance, the 
nuisance in question being the danger from fire to the 
plaintiffs' premises, where a large quantity of inflammable 
drugs and other goods were stored, in consequence of the 
high-pressure system, amounting sometimes to as much as 
10,000 volts, used by the defendants. 

Mr. C. M. Warmington, Q C, and Mr. Vernon Smith were 
counsel for the plaintiffs ; and Mr. Fletcher Moulton, Q.C., 
and Mr. Hamilton represented the London Electric Supply 
Corporation (Limited). 

The plaintiffs' case, in support of which considerable evi- 
dence was called, was that in consequence of the use 
of the high-pressure system there was great danger 
from fire at the defendants' distributing centre in the 
Grosvenor Mews, where they received large supplies of elec- 
tricity, sent to them from their generating station at Dept- 
ford. It was stated that a number of accidents had already 
occurred, and that there had been at least one serious fire on 
the defendants' premises. The London Electric Supply 
Corporation retorted that when the accidents and fire 
occurred their property was only temporarily fitted up, and 
that now the chamber in which the electricity was received 
had been made entirely fireproof, so that under no circum- 
stances could a fire take place again. It was, said the de- 
fendants, to their interest to make their distributing 
stations as safe as possible, and they had used every 
endeavour to do so. 

His lordship, in the result, intimated his intention of 
allowing the action to stand over for three months, with a 
view to seeing whether the defendants would take extra 
precautions to prevent any danger from fire or otherwise 
arising from the upper portions of their building, which he 
did not consider at the present time were entirely fireproof. 



BANKRUPTCY REPORT. 



Re John Henby Thomas, Chester, chemist and druggist. 

At the Chester Castle, on March 26, before His Hunour, 
Sir Horatio Lloyd, Mr. E. S. Giles made an application for 
the discharge of John Henry Thomas, lately trading with 
Thomas Williams, under the title of Grindley & Son, chem- 
ists, Northgate Street. Mr. W. T. Rogers, solicitor, appeared 
to consent to the application on behalf of the trustee. No 
creditors appeared. The Assistant Official Receiver having 
pointed out that the dividend paid had exceeded the debtor's 
original estimate, His Honour granted the order of discharge, 
subject to a nominal suspension of one day. 



PARTNERSHIPS DISSOLVED. 
Chapman & Pain, Ipswich, pharmaceutical chemists. 
Hart, H. B. & E. L., Mincing Lane, City, colonial brokers and commis- 
sion merchants. 

Houghton & Smith, Blaokburn, aerated-water manufacturers. 
McDonald & Skelton, Eastwood, oil and colour merchants and mineral- 
water manuf actorers. 

THE BANKRUPTCY ACTS, 1883 AND 1890. 
Receiving Obdebs. 

Crapp, A., Stanmore, veterinary surgeon. 

Edlln, Edward Holbcrton, Plymouth and Tamerton Folllott, 

surgeon. 

Esler, Robert, Queen's Boad, Peckham, surgeon. 

White. William Stokoe, Moss Side and Manchester, chemist's 
assistant. 

Obdeb made on Application fob Dischabob. 

Dixon, Cecil Bernardino, Southampton, and Dixon, Sara, late of 

St. Raphael, France, now of Southflelds, Wandsworth, trading as Dixon 
& Cardns, Southampton, oil-cake and artifloial manure manufacturers 
— unconditional order of discharge granted. 



April 18, 1891.1 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



539 




IT was on February 15, 1841, that a " large and influential 
public meeting of chemists and druggists " was held at 
the Crown and Anchor Tavern, in the Strand, to consider the 
Medical Bill which Mr. Benjamin Hawes, the member for 
Lambeth, was then trying to pass through Parliament, and 
which was regarded by the chemists and druggists of that 
day as so seriously inimical to their interests. It was in 
consequence of their association in opposition to that Bill 
that these chemists and druggists met again at the Crown 
and Anchor on April 15, 1841, and resolved, among other 
things — 

That for the purpose of protecting the permanent interests, 
and increasing the respectability of chemists and drugguts, 
an Association be now formed under the title of the 

Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. 

William Allen, F.R.S., moved that resolution, and John 
Bell seconded it. At the same meeting a committee was 
appointed " to frame laws and regulations for the govern- 
ment of the Society." The names of that committee have 
often been quoted before, but must be given again. They 
were : — 



Allen, William, F.R.S., Plough 
Court 

Alsop, Robert, 15 Sloane Square 
Barron, Charles. 6 Oiltf pur Street 
Barry, John T.. Plough Court 
Battley, Richard, 32 Lower White- 

oross Street 
Baxter, George, 144 High Hol- 

born 

Bell, Jacob, 338 Oxford Street 
BrlggB. Edwin, 48 Wigmore Street 
Butler, Thomas, 4 Cheap9ide 
Davy, Charles, 100 Upper Thames 
Street 

Do Caatro, Samuel, 25 Great St. 

George's Place, Knightsbridge 
Dinneford, Charlet, 172 New Bond 

Street 

Kills, John, 225 Upper Thames 
Street 

i'armar, Robert A., 40 Westminster 
Road 

Foulger, Samuel, 133 RatcIiffeHigh- 
way 

Glfford, Joseph, 104 Strand 
Green, Samuel, 1 Harleyford Place, 

Kenning ton 
Hanbnry, Daniel B., Plough Court 
Herring, Thomas, 40 Aldersgatc 

Street 



Horner, Edward, 20 Bucklersbury 
Hudson, William B., 27 Haymarket 
Ince, William, 31 Southampton 

Street, Covent Garden 
Keating, Thomas, 79 St. Paul's 

Churchyard 
Lescher, J. S., 4 Cripplegate Build- 
ings 

Lowe, William, 47 Blackfriars Road 
Mayhew, Samuel M., Camberwell 
Green 

Morson, Thomas, 19 Southampton 
Row 

Payne, C. J., 5 St. Martin's Court 
Pound, Matthew, 198 Oxford Street 
Pigeon, Richard Holham,31Throg- 

morton Street 
Savory, John, 143 Bond Street 
Simkio, Edward, 2 New Cavendish 

Street 

Smith, Joseph, 29 Haymarket 
Smith, Geo. W., 125 Lower Thames 
Street 

Squire, Peter, 277 Oxford Street 
Stamper, Ralph, 140 Leadenhall 
Street 

Toller, John, 18 Conduit Street 
Walkor, Thomas, 48 Tonloy Street 
Wuugh, George, 177 Regent Street 
Winstanlcy, Edward, 7 Poultry 



Nearly 100 member* associated themselves that day to 
form the body whose Qftieth anniversary has now come round. 
Of the forty whot>e names are quoted above, only two, we 
hink— Mr Edward Horner and Mr. Joseph Sidney Lescher— 



survive. Some thirty out of the forty businesses represented 
on the list remain, though with many personal or local 
modifications. The names of Allen, Bell, and Dinneford are 
still associated with their respective businesses, on the 
same spots where they themselves once reigned, but they 
are now represented by strangers. Direct descendants fill 
the places of Barron, Hanbury, Herring, Morson, Savory, and 
Squire. About a third of the group were wholesale druggists. 
Of these the firms with which Charles Barron, Bichard 
Battley, and Thomas Herring were connected alone remain 
at the same address as that which they gave on the evening 
of April 15, 1841. 

Mr. G. W. Smith and Mr. Farmar were appointed secre- 
taries, and a sub-committee was nominated to frame laws 
and an organisation. Five thousand reports were sent out 
to chemists and druggists all over the kingdom, though it is 
difficult to understand how at that time, when anyone who 
pleased could call himself a chemist and druggist, such a 
number of suitable persons could have been discovered and 
invited to join the new Society. An informal meeting of 
chemists and druggists was held at Mr. Bell's house on 
May 11, and the first meeting of the Society was convened 
at the Crown and Anchor on June 1, 1841, and at this it was 
arranged that the committee should act as the Council of 
the Society until May, 1842, after which date a Council of 
twenty- one members was to be elected. The Council then 
drafted, and in July issued, 5,000 copies of an address report, 
ing progress and indicating their objects and intentions. In 
July, 1841, Jacob Bell tentatively established the Pharma- 
ceutical Journal, and, just before the year ended, the 
premises in Bloomsbury Square were taken for the purposes 
of the Society at a rental of 240/. a year. Courses of 
lectures were commenced in 1842, Dr. A. T. Thomson, as 
professor of botany, opening his session in May ; while Dr. 
Pereira began to lecture on materia medica, Mr. Fownes on 
chemistry, and Mr. Redwood on pharmacy in the following 
October. The first examinations were held in July, 1842. 

Jacob Bell. 

It is abundantly evident from this concise narration of 
the principal events occurring within the first year or year 
and a half of the Society's existence that someone of 
unusual energy and ability was organising and est ablishing 
the institution. The more closely the history of the origin 
of the Pharmaceutical Society is examined, the more evident 
appears the preponderating share of the labour undertaken 
by Mr. Jacob Bell. Chemists and druggists have never had 
a more brilliant nor a safer friend. 

Wealthy, accomplished, and populnr in the best social 
circles, Mr. Bell had no pecuniary objects to gain by his work 
on behalf of the trade with which he was connected. On 



540 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



fApril 18 1891. 



the contrary, his was one of the half-dozen establishments 
which profited by the general indefiniteness of the term 
" chemist and druggist." Fastidious customers, not knowing 
whom to rely upon in the country, obtained their medicines 
from one of those shops in London which had acquired a 
special reputation. It may be that Mr. Bell was ambitious 
of an honourable fame. He saw a piece of work to do, and 
lie did it with his might. Very likely the recent formation 
of the Chemical Society suggested the idea of a Pharma- 
ceutical Society to his mind. The London chemists were 
just then associated in de- 
fence of their in terests against 
Mr. Hawes's Bill, and this 
temporary communion fur- 
nished the opportunity. Hav- 
ing induced the leading Lon- 
don druggists to form the 
nucleus of an association, and 
started a journal with the 
object of explaining and ad- 
vertising its aims, Mr. Bell 
set to work to bring in mem- 
bers by visiting the provinces 
and holding meetings of the 
chemists in all the centres. 
So handsome was the success 
he attained that when the 
first annual meeting of the 
Society was held in May, 
1842, the accounts showed 
that 2 life members, 982 sub- 
scribing members (paying at 
that time two guineas each 
per annum) and 976 asso- 
ciates (paying one guinea 
•each per annum), had been 
enrolled. There were 202 
London and 780 country 
members, and 196 town and 
'780 country associates. 

From his schooldays Jacob 
Bell was clever with his pen 
as well as with his pencil. 
He was educated chiefly at a 
school conducted by a mem- 
ber of the Society of Friends 
at Darlington, and there he 
and another lad named Ford 
conducted a schoolboys'maga- 
zlne, which they entitled the 
Bell-Ford Gazette. After 
leaving school he was appren- 
ticed in his father's establish- 
ment, and attended scientific 
lectures at the Royal Institu- 
tion and at King's College. 
He also for a time took 

drawing lessons at Sass's school, where he made the ac- 
quaintance of men [who became among the most famous 
artists of the century. The young chemist had a natural 
pift for drawing and painting, and if circumstances had 
led him to take up art as a profession, his industry and 
perseverance would have ensured his success. .He was 
a clever horseman, too, and much enjoyed a run with 
the hounds, but gave up hunting at his father's request. He 
was about 30 years of age when he commenced the work of 
his life on behalf of British pharmacy. From the first he 
aimed at the incorporation of the trade into a legally recog- 




JACOB 

(From the Portrait fainted 



nised body. He did not live to see his purposes accom- 
plished, but he cleared the way for their attainment by first 
giving voice to the demand which was at last satisfied by 
the Pharmacy Act of 1868. 

In Pahmament. 

It was with the express object of obtaining such an Act 
as that that Mr. Bell entered Parliament in 1850. In those 
days seats in the House of Commons were not exactly on 
sale, but a long purse and carte blanche to use it were the 

stipulations which agents 
made when they were con- 
sulted. Among Mr. Bell's 
many accomplishments, a 
familiarity with politics did 
not figure. " He was so little 
versed in political affairs," 
wrote his biographer soon 
after his death, "that he 
actually did not know with 
which party his principles 
would lead him to associate." 
He appears + o have decided 
in favour of Liberalism, when 
a vacancy occurred at Et. 
Albans with a presumption, 
we suppose, in favour of a 
candidate of that colour, and 
after a contest with Sir R. 
Garden, we believe, as his 
Conservative opponent, Mr. 
Bell was elected ; and St. 
Albans, having on that occa- 
sion filled the measure of its 
electoral iniquities, wa» dis- 
franchised. On the ground 
that Mr. Bell bad not himself 
taken part in the bribery 
which was proved against his 
agents, he was allowed to re- 
tain his seat till the end of 
the Parliament. He subse- 
quently contested the repre- 
sentation of Great Marlow 
and Marylebone, but was un- 
successful at both. 

He was in Parliament for 
about eighteen months only, 
and devoted himself to the 
'ask of passing a Pharmacy 
Bill. His hope of securing 
statutory sanction for a mea- 
sure covering the whole trade 
was doomed to disappoint- 
ment. The utmost Parliament 
would grant was protection 
of the titles of pharmaceu- 
tical chemist and its relatives, the value of which it was 
recognised had been created by the Pharmaceutical So- 
ciety—though Mr. Hume (the Radical) and Mr. Henley 
(the Tory), knowing nothing of the work which had been 
done, made it the subject of cheap and ungenerous 
sneers. Mr. Bell was bitterly disappointed at the result 
of his efforts, as his speeches and articles, just after 
the passing of his Bill, showed. He felt that he had only 
made a short advance towards the goal he sought to reach, 
and he had no thought of abandoning his enterprise. But 
for two or three years after the passing of the Act of 1852 



BELL. 

f/ySn: Edwin Laxdsueb.) 23 



April 18, 1891] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



541 



much of the energy of the Council was engaged in some 
stupid disputes over by-lavs and the admission of members, 
which culminated in a law-suit. Afterwards Mr. Bell's 
health began to break. He presided at the annual meeting 
of the Society in May, 1859, but the disease whioh was 
rapidly gainiDg on him— laryngeal phthisis— prevented the 
nee of his voice. He was re-elected president on June 1, 
tout died at Tunbridge Wells on the 12th of that month, at 
the early age of forty-nine. 

He left to the nation a magnificent collection of paintings, 
including the best of Landseer's and Frith's, Rosa Bonheur's 
"Horse Fair," and other works, the selection of whioh testi- 
fied to his excellent artistic judgment. To the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society he left 2,000/ , to be devoted as the Council 
should think best for the promotion of pharmaceutical edu- 



ceutlcal subjects contributed to the evening meetings of 
the Society, and his comments on other papers read at 
those meetings, show that he was closely in touch with 
the every-day proceedings of the shop. The organisa- 
tion and the direction of the affairs of the Pharmaceutical 
Society were, it appears, left almost entirely to him. He 
edited the first e'ghteen volumes of the Pharmaceutical 
Journal, and himself wrote a very large portion of them. And, 
besides all this, be seems to have had time to make himself 
well known and highly popular in some of the most inaces- 
sible circles of society. 

Jacob Bell as a Journalist. 
Over the Journal he regularly lost somethirg like 50/. 
a year until the last few jears. When it began to be profit- 




Illli balluliAloill. 

(Frjm .'A" W.t'er-colour Dnuctnj by W. HasT, tvpmenting Ihe I.aboratcrti at Jcl.n lirll A Co.'s, Oifortl ,-lrrrl ) 



cation. The Council expended the greater part of this 
money in building and fitting new laboratories on the top of 
their premises in Bloomsbury Square. They also collected 
another 2,000/ , or thereabouts, with which they established 
the Jacob Bell Memorial Scholarships. It may be noted, 
ae an evidence of the esteem in which Mr. Bell was held in 
the highest artistic and literary circles, that among the con- I 
tributors to this fund appeared the names of Charles Dickens, j 
William Makepeace Thackeray, Sir Edwin Lindseer, Sir i 
Charles Eastlake, and many other famous painters. Most ' 
of the heads of the medical profession also subscribed. 

His Capacity foh Wobk 
must have been immense. He appears 1o have personally ' 
■superintended his businefc. and it is certain that he was a 
Piaster of its details; his original papers on phar ma- 



able he made it over as a gift to the Society. His editorial 
articles, his answers to correspondents, atd his comments on 
extracts, are generally as interesting and valuable now as 
when tbcy were fir»t published. In them all it is evidett. 
that bis heart was in his work ; that he was aiming to place 
British pharmacy on a level with that of the Continent. 
He was conciliatory to all parties, but he never hesitated to 
take risks when it berame necessary to expose a fraud or to 
attack an abuse. He could bit back with effect when 
occasion required. His delicate sense of humour rendered 
all he wrote attractive. 

The early volumes of the Pharmaceutical Journal contain 
freqiunt evidence of the objections which bad to be met 
to the scheme of union and advancement which Mr. Bell 
aimed at. An effective way of dealing with these which he 
sometimes adopted was to print exactly contradictory 



542 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



criticisms in juxtaposition. Thus, for instance, in his third 
number, in an article answering inquiries and objections, he 
quotes one man who says there would be an inducement to 
join the Society if it would protect chemists against grocers 
and oilmen; and another, who says he must decline to join 
if they intend to prohibit grocers and small dealers from 
selling drugs, as a considerable portion of his business 
consisted in supplying these parties. 

There is or was in the Pharmaceutical Society's library a 
copy of Nees von Esenbeck's Planta; Medicinal ct, a work of 
considerable value, and it contains on the fly- leaf, in Mr. 
Bell's writing, the following gently satirical inscription: — 

" A member of the Council having an offer of this book at 
about half-price, proposed it to the Council, and it was 
resolved unanimously that it was desirable to secure it for 
the Pharmaceutical Society. It was therefore referred to 
the Library Committee ; but in the meantime it was neces- 
sary to give an answer, which the member above mentioned 
did, taking the book, and waiting the final decision of the 
committee. 

" When the committee met the book was rejected ; con- 
sequently the member of Council who was saddled with 
it now has the pleasure of presenting it to the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society.— April, 1850." 

One of the happiest essays Jacob Bell ever wrote was 
the 

Memoir of his Father, 

which will be found at the end of the eighth volume of the 
Pharmaceutical Journal. The sketch presented of the con- 
scientious, timid, but high-minded Quaker gentleman is 
perfect in its way, and leaves on record a life-history 
which seems to be growing rarer in these latkr days. John 
Bell was the second son of Jacob Bell, a pious old Quaker, 
who was in business at Wapping with a brother-in-law as a 
mast-maker. When the American war broke out old Jacob 
Bell could not reconcile his business to his conscience. He 
therefore withdrew from the firm, and opened a hosier's shop, 
in which enterprise, however, he was less successful. John 
Bell served his apprenticeship with a chemist in the Hay- 
market. He was quite as scrupulous as his father had been. 
He took " the shop in Oxford Street " with much fear and 
trembling, and the first year he lost money. But that tender 
conscience of his which so often kept him back from enter- 
prises which others would have embarked in, justified itself 
in the long run. From the first he resolved to sell nothing 
but pure medicines, and after the second year, when his 
reputation had become established, his business began to 
grow amazingly. " There was no longer any occasion," says 
the writer of the " Historical Sketch of Pharmacy," " for 
the shopboy, John Simmons, to find occupation at the back 
of the shop in pounding a dusting-cloth in the bell-metai 
mortar in order to maintain a semblance of business 
activity. . . ." The shopboy grew to be the laboratory man 
who has since been immortalised by Hunt's water-colour 
drawing of " The Laboratory," an outline sketch of which ac- 
companies this notice. The drawing was made, we believe, in 
the time of Mr. Jacob Bell, and faithfully represents the back 
of the famous " shop in Oxford Street " about 1841. 

In the memoir to which we have referred, Mr. Jacob Bell 
says bis father " never solicited business, or courted the 
patronage of the profession ; nor was he ambitious of extend- 
ing his connection among the higher circles of society. To 
the poor he was always attentive, and it was a favourite 
remark with him that he often had twelve customers for a 
shilling." His assistants were all members of the Society of 
Friends, and it was his custom, as long as he had the active 
management of the business, to always keep his shop closed 
on Thursday mornings till past twelve o'clock, to allow all 
except one or two on duty " to attend meeting." In the 



latter years of his life he became a total abstainer, in pur- 
suance of his conscientious impulses. After he had been a 
teetotaler for some seven years, however, his doctors thought 
some stimulant was necessary for bim. " For some time he 
was unwilling to deviate from his abstinent resolve, but Dr. 
Wilson, who seconded Dr. Hodgkin in this advice, suggested 
a plan which overcame the scrapie. The wine was put 
pp in two- ounce bottles, and sent from the shop as a medi- 
cine." Oh .' Sancta simplicitas. 

John Bell died at Wandsworth, on January 14, 1849, in the 
75th year of his age. " In taking leave of bis family,' 
writes his biographer, " his only anxiety appeared to be on. 
their account, With regard to himself he was calm an<> 
resigned, and his constitutional nervous timidity, which had 
been his constant companion through life, forsook him at 
the hour of death." 

Jacob Bell's Pictures. 

The sketch of Mr. Bell's life, published in the Pharmaceu- 
tical Journal soon after his death, was written by Daniel 
Hanbury, and has been reprinted in the " Science Papers," 
edited after Hanbury's death by Joseph Ince. It was an 
appreciative but by no means an exaggerated record of his 
career. Mr. Hanbury mentions the legacy of famous pictures- 
which Jacob Bell left to the nation, and which are now in the 
National Gallery. Among these were " The Sleeping Blood- 
hound," " The Shoeing," " Alexander and Diogenes," " Dig- 
nity and Impudence," " The Defeat of Comus," " The Maid 
and the Magpie," all by Sir Edwin Lands eer; "The Horse 
Fair," by Kosa Bonheur; "The Derby Day," by Frith; 
'• James II. Receiving the News of the Landing of the Prince 
of Orange," by Ward ; cattle-pieces by Lee and Cooper ; and 
other paintings. The value of these, Mr. Hanbury remarked, 
had been estimated at 18,0002. to 20,00QJ.— a fairly cautious* 
calculation, we should say. Ten times that figure would be 
nearer the estimate now. 

In his "Reminiscences" Mr. W. P. Frith, R A., tells several 
amusing anecdotes of Jacob Bell as an art student and an 
art patron. Frith and Bell were contemporaries at Sass's 
drawing-school, but, says Mr. Frith, " Honest old Sass could 
do nothing with Jacob, who completed the list of his mis- 
deeds one day by sketching in the very centre of his drawing- 
lesson the scene of an execution at Newgate. Mr. Sass- 
looked at the drawing, and went out of the studio — a pin 
might have been heard to drop. Bell looked round and 
winked at me. Sass returned, walked slowly up to Mr. Jacob- 
Bell, and addressed him: — 'Sir, Mr. Bell; sir, your father 
placed you under my care for the purpose of making an 
artist of you. I can't do it ; I can make nothing of you. I 
should be robbing your father if I did it. You had better 
go, sir ; such a career as this,' pointing to the man hanging, 
'is a bad example to your fellow- pupils. You must leave, 
sir.' 'All right,' said Bell, and away he went, returning to- 
the druggist's shop established by his father in Ox ford Street, 
where he made a large fortune." Mr. Frith records that old 
John Bell, " who never quite got out of his early Quaker ten- 
dencies towards frugality," reproached his son with frittering- 
away his money on works of art. But when the old gentle- 
man was assured that all the pictures in Jacob's pos- 
session would bring more than they cost, and that not a 
few might be sold for twice the money, he reconsidered 
his hasty opinions, and suggested that the collection should 
be increased. Jacob Bell's knowledge of what pictures were 
likely to be popular is evidenced by his purchase from Mr. 
Frith of the picture which, under the title " Sherry, Sir 1 " 
has since become almost universally known. Mr. Frith gives 
the history of this picture. " A little study," he says, " done 
from a good-looking girl who was in my service as house- 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



543 



maid had a great success as an engraving. I painted the 
not only in her habit as she lived, but in her habits 
also, for she was carrying a tray with a bottle of wine on it 
— the whole thing was simple enough. The picture was 
bought by Jacob Bell, who— convinced that there was what 
he called 'copyright' in it — succeeded in extracting forty 
guineas from a well-known publisher, who, differing in 
opinion from Bell as to the value of the copyright, imme- 
diately transferred it, at a great loss, to another and more 
adventurous printseller. Bell presented me with the copy- 
right money, and I heard with pleasure that the picture was 
placed in the hands of Frank Holl, afterwards A.R.A., an 
admirable engraver and most worthy man. Holl produced 
an excellent print from the little picture. I approved, and 
it was published, after being — without my knowledge — 
christened ' Sherry, Sir ? ' What a thorn in my side did that 
terrible title become ! I dined out frequently, and dreaded 
■the approach of the servant with the sherry ; for the inevit- 
able ' Sherry, sir ? ' rang in my 
ears, and reminded my neigh- 
bour at the table of my 
crime." 

According to Mr. Frith, 
Jacob Bell was deservedly 
expelled from the Society of 
Friends for a boyish freak, 
which does not exhibit our 
iiero in a very creditable 
light. He was caught attend- 
ing '-meeting" in female 
attire. That was clearly long 
before Landseer painted his 
portrait. But Jacob Bell 
would probably not have con- 
tinued in communion with 
his father's co-religionists 
Aong, even if the severance 
had not come so suddenly. 



THE PRESIDENTS OF 
THE PHARMACEUTICAL 
SOCIETY". 

WiUiam Allen, F.R.S., the 
first President of the Phar- 
maceutical Society, was a 
man of European fame when 
the Society was organised, 
•and his name gave weight 
was then over 70 years of 
thropic schemes in hand, it 




Society, and he was also one of the partners with the atheist 
Robert Owen in the socialistic scheme which the latter 
organised. There arose some friction between Allen and 
Owen, and the latter has referred to his associate as narrow- 
minded, bustling, and ambitious. But Allen stuok to the 
scheme the longest. He became trastee for the Duke of 
Kent, father of the Queen, and was on more or less intimate 
terms with Alexander I., the Emperor of Russia, whom he 
once took to a Friends' meeting-house. His last active effort 
was an " agricultural colony," which he assisted in founding 
at Lindfield, in Sussex, where he died on December 30, 
1843. 

Mr. C. J. Payne, the second President, occupied the 
position only four months. But he had had a large share in 
the foundation of the Society. He was unknown to the 
majority of the chemists when he spoke at the meeting on 
February 15, 1841, but his clear sound sense was at once 
Mr. Bell induced him to take an active part in 
the proceedings, and when 



appreciated 



taut- 



A 



to 



the enterprise. But he 
age, and, with many philan- 
could hardly have been ex- 



pected that he could devote himself very energetically to the 
work of the Pharmaceutical Society. He was the son of a 
Spitalfields silk manufacturer, and was a member of the 
Society of Friends, as his father had been before him. He 
had strong inclinations towards scientific investigations, and 
it was these that induced him to prefer the chemical trade 
to the silk manufacture, ne entered the business of Messrs. 
Gurney k Bevan, in Plough Court, and ultimately succeeded 
to it. From him the firms of Allen & Hanburys and Howards 
tc Sons (at first Allen & Howard) are directly descended. 
He was an intimate friend of Sir Humphry Davy, who intro- 
duced him as a lecturer at the Royal Institution, and for over 
twenty years he was a regular lecturer on chemistry at Guy's 
Hospital. He became closely associat ed with Clarkson and 
Wilberforcc in the anti-slavery crusade, and with James Mill 
in the conduct of a quarterly review called the Philanthropist, 
He was one of the founders of the British and Foreign School 



the Society was formed he 
was appointed vice-president. 
This position he held until 
Mr. Allen's death in January, 
1844, when he was elected to 
the chair, but his failing 
health compelled him to re- 
linquish all public work in 
the May following, and he 
died four months later. A 
very appreciative testimony 
to his services was inscribed 
on vellum, and presented to 
his daughter by the Council, 
and a duplicate was hung in 
the Council-room and is still 
preserved. Mr. Payne was a 
qualified apothecary, but he 
traded as a chemist and drug- 
gist only, in St. Martin's 
Court. His shop has been 
improved away many years 
ago, none of his relatives are 
known, and no portrait of 
him can be obtained. 

Mr. John Savory was his 
successor in the presidential 
chair, and retained the posi- 
tion four consecutive years. 
He was a nephew of the first Savory whose name became con- 
nected with pharmacy, and it is his grandsons who are now 
associated with the well-known firm in Bond Street. The 
entire absence of any published record of the proceedings 
of the Pharmaceutical Council during the first twenty-five 
years of its existence precludes the possibility of doing fair 
justice to the services of its early officers. The long teim 
of Mr. Savory's presidency seems to indicate that he was a 
man of energy and power. He died in 1871. 

Mr. T. N. R. Morson, who succeeded Mr. Savory in 1848, was 
President for one year then, and for nearly three years sub- 
sequently, when he was elected to fill the vacancy caused by 
the death of Jacob Bell. He was one of the pioneers of 
modern pharmacy, and was the first English chemist to make 
sulphate of quinine and morphia. He was a strong conser- 
vative pillar of the Pharmaceutical Society until 1870, when 
he retired. He died in March, 1874, at the nge of 73. 

Mr. Peter Squire became President first in 1849 for a year, 
and filled the office again for two years from 1861 to 1863. 
He, too, had fought his way up to the highest rank, and was 



lerL- 



F.R.S 



»T AND D 



1901. 



It N 



857. la Um 77th year of his «• We regret to have to add that n. 
of Mi ban ar.Luitar.t or. the Benevolent Kurd, which her father had 
assisted to cr«»l«. 

Henry Pool a. ab was oloctod President in 1853. and served for two 
»aar» was a typical retail pharmacist Me was of Quaker origin, and the 
■lory of Ma tarty otvwgfloo a a* told in autobiographical form in this journal 
1870 Mr Draae was President during the time the Pharuiaceu- 
aas eagtgrd in a Unf IomjwI contest oror the by laws initiated by 
ay petrel of tt» fortabe*. Mr. Dickinson, and ■ hair man of the Pbar 
Ooeamiuee a hu-l. acted in oo operation with the College of 1'hy- 
ta mUtag peehmtnarr roports which lod to the united British l'har- 
be did a bug* amount of useful woik Perhaps no man among 
•bo I saw »f PresHWet* won sach a tdv spread love and respect as Henry Diane. 
Ho dtod ta April. 1874 aged 87 
After Mr Does*. Mr J. T. Derenport preoided over the Society's fortuuea 



V 

Ml bo has aay < 



I.* Mr Ihiveapvt bad boou an ti 
Mpfcin I I la Ureal Ma— II 8tr*e 
( oat of obkajdyoo. siaoo the dj 
has perhaps 
•ilk mail pbaratacy la recetit times litilo r 
la 16*Y Mr Jaeoh Mall himeelf awMMft 
bi hi 




and indeed) 
the fortune 
it the l'har- 
! association 

the Society 
reived a pre 



Me had alwuv. exert 
dominant i r m nee, but had preferred 
that the place« of honour should be 
tiled by others. His years of actual 
premiership were unhappily those of 
his woskrs*. health, though he con- 
tinued to write for the Society and te» 
•peek, for It ■ long as his physical 
powers allowtd him to do so. He was 
President for | lite* f u!l Teats, mid bad 
bean Just elrc'td for a f.-urth term when 
death to V I iiu When he presided i» 
the annual meetirg in M.iy, 18. r >9, only 
a tin nth hefore hia death, lie ha'', losl 
the power of speech, and his address 
was r«ad for him. He went to Tnn- 
hridge Well*, and there, after nmking 
arrangvmrtits for the dis|osal of all hi* 
narthly Koods, he calmly awaited the 
inevitable summons. He had only at- 
tained bis 49. h year. 

On Mr Hells death, Mr. Morson was 
again calNd to the preslduioy, which 
be served for two more riars, and dur 



Mr wi ih asa laae as* dots*. Veal fa* eaa 

s, -we asvt van oa ta* t «*• ■ n of Z 
MWw death ta Ma fats, I 



*, Covent 
■ founds- 
aria* Mr 

.•wvl/ •». rait absrb re.,1— A ta. its* Pbaimw? Ac * l8f2 Mr Joorph 
l»ro wait ksown ta atotera f* sn»*rt**» aisd tfce He» Canoa Inee, D.D., 

Ttarasaa Merits*, aba KIWved (1861 MV was the tnt portly wholesale 
araasrkst ta the ctsatr Ma had taker aa » •(»* p*rt la ta* foimaUon of the 
t » stoat- wrta several otbor of the London wholesale drug 



a-teto Ho had boei 



•trans**' M 



taatiewd to the retail uade ta Norwich, bat had been 
I axloa haene aad omnsooe rod baetaees for himeelf at a wholesale 
be bUtwIom Hi 1808 H Wwa areaa year* laur, when, his brother 
I teeaeved to tao la erattot which their successors 
to AWferagas* Hi real While President, Mr Herttaa was one of the 
■ . issaleed fcy the raoassttlao of tat) Heejea of C'cenmcnt appointed to 

r 1 1 Tor Mr Hell s paarntecy ranpoeala. Mr Hertlrg dlvd in September, 1864. 
to a»a •> h Tear 

Mr Jeesaa Gtffwrd wae the net* Praeid«nt He was a rhesnist in the 
fetrased osvt M was he who fillad lbs rhalr St Use Oown snd Anchor meetirir in 




1611. whoa the irs4e arst 



Mr tiiftonl 



r~><? 0 i rc 



April 18. 1891.1 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



545 



ing the two years following (1861-3) Mr. Peter Squire again 
held the sceptre. 

Mr. George Webb Sandford occupied the chair from 1863 
to 1869, during which time occurred the parliamentary con- 
test which ended in the Pharmacy Act of 1868; he was 
elected again in 1870, after Mr. Evans's presidency, but he 
then came into collision with the flowing tide of pharma- 
ceutical opinion on the subject of compulsory poisons 
regulations, and resigned his^office before his year was 
quite complete. He was once more elected in 1879, and 
served for a year. Mr. Sandford's first presidency must 
ever be memorable, as it was on him that fell the bulk 
of the work in connection with the enactment of the statute 
already referred to. Mr. Bell had striven very hard to obtain 
legislative recognition of pharmacy, and restriction of its 




WILLIAM I2TCE. 



practice to duly qualified men. The objects he had aimed 
at were to a great extent accomplished by the Act of 1868. 
The half-success which he attained by the Act of 1852 
was by no means satisfactory to him, and if his health 
had not failed he would have gone on with his efforts. 
After his death the Society was disposed to rest, and Mr. 
Sandford cannot be credited with the initiation of the agita- 
tion in which he became so much concerned. It was the 
then lately-established Medical Council which set the ball 
rolling. Some of its members were very anxious to extend 
ther control to pharmacists, a policy which was viewed 
approvingly at Bloomsbury Square, but with alarm by 
-chemists generally. The United Society of Chemists and 
Druggists, which had then but recently been organised, led 
the opposition, and talked of a Bill of its own. Members 
•of the Pharmaceutical Society became aroused, and called 
•on the Council to act. Instead of taking the opportunity 
which was again and again presented of uniting all parties, 
valuable time and energy were wasted in recriminations and 
discussions on trifles. Mr. Sandford was an able controver- 
sialist, and his ability tempted him to indulge in the com- 
bative rather than in the higher form of diplomacy. The 
Bill which the Pharmaceutical Society drafted was igno- 
minously rejected by Parliament ; that of the United Society 
was impossible, but it had a few characteristics which 
seemed capable of developing into a workable Act, and ulti- 
mately the House of Commons had to shape the rough-hewn 
schemes of the divided chemists itself. On Mr. Sandford's 



retirement from office in 1869, his friends and admirers gave 
him a dinner in celebration of the success of his labours, at 
which a service of plate, worth 200 guineas, was presented 
to him, while for a further sum of about 300/., the balance 
of the testimonial subscription, a portrait of him was painted 
by J. P. Knight, R.A., which is still one of the ornaments 
of the Council-room. Mr. Sandford is now living in retire- 
ment in his native county, Norfolk. 

Mr. Henry Sugden Evans, who was elected to the presi- 
dency in 1869, was a popular and able wholesale druggist, 
who had made his mark as a pharmacist, particularly in the 
Liverpool Chemists' Association, of which he had been one 
of the founders. The annual meeting over which he pre- 
sided in 1870 secured the unenviable reputation of being the 
most rowdy of the fifty, resulting almost in a free fight. A 
dead set against Mr. Evans was made by some London 
chemists in consequence of a statement that his firm had 
supplied drugs to a co-operative society, and an unscrupu- 
lous attempt was made to falsify the records of the voting 
by a too-enthusiastic scrutineer, who was found out, and 
retired from membership of the Society. Mr. Evans spent 
the latter years of his life in Canada, and died at New York 
about three years ago. 

Mr. Sandford resumed office for another year in 1870-71, 
but in view of the opposition with which his policy as to 
poisons regulations was met he retired in April, 1871, and 
was succeeded by Mr. Adolphus F. Haselden, a pharmacist of 
Conduit Street, who was elected for the two following years 
also. 

Mr. Haselden was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Hyde Hills, 
the friend, partner, and successor of Jacob Bell. Mr. Hills 
retained office for three consecutive years. After him, 

Mr. John Williams also filled the chair for three years 
(1876-79). Though most of Mr. Williams's business life was 




THOMAS H BERING. 



associated with the wholesale and manufacturing sections of 
the trade, he had been a retail chemist, and always retained 
his sympathies with those who practised that branch of phar- 
macy. His practical scientific acquirements were very 
marked, and he was a laboiious worker for the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society. 

Mr. Sandford was again called to the chair in 1879, and 
presided for one more year. Mr. Thomas Greenish was Pre- 
sident for the next two years, and Mr. Michael Carteighe 
was elected in 1882, and has already been re-elected in eight, 
successive years since Ho has now filled the presidential 
chair for a longer period than any of his predecessors. 



544 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 




JoK 



ocson 



the first chemist to be gazetted as on 
the Royal Household. Since his death, 
the appointment has been shared by his 
two sons. Peter Squire was a man of 
great energy. He was on the Council 
from the foundation of the Society, and 
was for many years one of its most 
searching examiners. He did a large 
amount of pharmaceutical work, com- 
piled hij famous " Companion," and 
was the delegate of the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society on the committee which 
prepared ths first Pharmacopoeia of 
the United Kingdom. In the last 
year of his presidency, Ihe Act was 
passed in which was inserttd the 
clause exempting pharmaceutical che- 
mists from jury service. To him, and 
to the secretary of the Society, Elias 
Bremridge, the credit of that achieve- 
ment was mainly due. Mr. Squire died 
in April, 1884, in his 86th year. 

Mr. William Ince was president for one year, in 1850-51. He was the manager 
of the famous old business of Godfrey & Cooke, in Southampton Street, Covent 
GardeD, and was on the Council of the PbarmaceuticalJSociety from its founda- 
tion till his death in March, 1853, in the 59th year of his age. It was during Mr 
Ince's presidency that Jacob Bell entered Parliament and commenced his ad- 
vocacy of the Bill which resulted in the Pharmacy Act of 1862. Mr. Joseph 
Ince, well known to modern pharmacists, and the Rev. Canon Ince, D.D., 
Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford, are his sons. 

Thomas Herring, who followed (1851-52), was the first purely wholesale 
druggist in the chair. He had taken an active part in the formation of the 
Pharmaceutical Society along with several other of the London wholesale drug- 
gists. He had been apprenticed to the retail trade in Norwich, but had been 
engaged in a London house and commenced business for himself as a wholesale 
druggist in the Barbican in 1808. It was seven years later, when, his brother 
having joined him, the firm lemoved to the premises which their successors 
still occupy in Aldersgate Street. While President, Mr. Herring was one of the 
witnesses examined by the committee of the House of Commons appointed to 
consider Mr. Bell's pharmacy proposals. Mr. Heriirg diud in September, 1864i 
in his 80th year. 

Mr. Joseph Gifford was the next President. He was a chemist in the 
Strand, and it was he who rilled the chair at the Crown and Anchor meetirg in 
February, 1841, when the trade first met to oppose Mr. Hawen's bill. Mr. Oiftord 



died in 1857, in the 77th year of his age. We regret to have to add that a 
daughter of his is an annuitant on the Benevolent Fund, which her father had 
assisted to create. 

Henry Deane, who was elected President in 1853, and served for two 
years, was a typical retail pharmacist. He was of Quaker origin, and the 
story of his early struggles was told in autobiographical form in this journal 
in November, 1870. Mr. Deane was President during the time the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society was engaged in a long legal contest over the by-laws initiated by 
the stormy petrel of its fortunes, Mr. Dickinson, and as chairman of the Phar- 
macopeia Committee which acted in co operation with the College of Phy- 
sicians in making preliminary reports which led to the united British Phar- 
macopoeia, he did a large amount of useful woik. Perhaps no man among 
the line of Presidents won'such wide-spread love and respect as Henry Deane. 
He died in April, 1874, aged 67. 

After Mr. Deane, Mr. J. T. Davenport presided over the Society's fortunes 
for a year. Mr. Davenport had been an examiner, and he was, and indeed 
still is, a pharmacist in Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, though the fortune 
he has made out of chlorodyne, since the days when he assisted at the Phar- 
maceutical Council meetings, has perhaps rendered his personal association, 
with retail pharmacy in recent times little more than nominal. 

In 1865, Mr. Jacob Bell himself accepted the presidency of the Society 
which he had so largely assisted to create. He had always exercised a pre- 
dominant itfluence, but had preferred 
that the places of honour should be 
filled by others. His years of actuai 
premiership were unhappily those of 
his weakest; health, though he con- 
tinued to write for the Society and to 
speak for it as long as his physical 
powers allowed him to do so. He was 
President for three full years, and had 
been just elected for a fourth term when 
death took him. When he presided at 
the annual meeting in May, 1859, only 
a month before his death, he had lost, 
the power of speech, and his address 
was read for him. He went to Tun- 
bridge Wells, and there, after making 
arrangements for the disposal of all his 
earthly goods, he calmly awaited the 
inevitable summons. He had only at- 
tained his 49ch year. 

On Mr. Bell's death, Mr. Morson was 
again called to the presidency, whicb 
he served for two mere years, and dur- 





April 18. 1891.) 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



..45 



ing the two years following (1861-3) Mr. Peter Squire again 
held the sceptre. 

Mr. George Webb Sandford occupied tho chair from 1863 
to 1869, during which time occurred the parliamentary con- 
test which ended in the Pharmaoy Aot of 1868 ; he was 
elected again in 1870, after Mr. Evans's presidency, but he 
then came into collision with the flowing tide of pharma- 
ceutical opinion on the subject of compulsory poisons 
regulations, and resigned his^office before his year was 
quite complete. He was once more elected in 1879, and 
served for a year. Mr. Sandford's first presidency must 
ever be memorable, as it was on him that fell the bulk 
of the work in connection with the enactment of the statute 
already referred to. Mr. Bell had striven very hard to obtain 
legislative recognition of pharmacy, and restriction of its 




WILLIAM IXCE. 



practice to duly qualified men. The objects he had aimed 
at were to a great extent accomplished by the Act of 1868. 
The half-success which he attained by the Act of 1852 
was by no means satisfactory to him, and if his health 
had not failed he would have gone on with his efforts. 
After his death the Society was disposed to rest, and Mr. 
Sandford cannot be credited with the initiation of the agita- 
tion in which he became so much concerned. It was the 
then lately-established Medical Council which set the ball 
rolling. Some of its members were very anxious to extend 
ther control to pharmacists, a policy which was viewed 
approvingly at Bloomsbury Sqnare, but with alarm by 
-chemists generally. The United Society of Chemists and 
Druggists, which had then but recently been organised, led 
the opposition, and talked of a Bill of its own. Members 
•of the Pharmaceutical 8ociety became aroused, and called 
•on the Council to act. Instead of taking the opportunity 
which was again and again presented of uniting all parties, 
valuable time and energy were wasted in recriminations and 
discussions on trifles. Mr. Sandford was an able controver- 
sialist, and his ability tempted him to indnlge in the com- 
bative rather than in the higher form of diplomacy. The 
Bill which the Pharmaceutical Society drafted was igno- 
minously rejected by Parliament ; that of the United Society 
was impossible, but it had a few characteristics which 
seemed capable of developing into a workable Act, and ulti- 
mately the House of Commons had to shape the rough-hewn 
schemes of the divided ckeraists itself. On Mr. Sandford's 



retirement from office in 1869, bin friends and admirers gave 
him a dinner in celebration of the success of his labours, at 

which a service of plate, worth 200 guineas, was • ■ > .; 

to him, while for a further sum of about 300/., the balance 
of the testimonial subscription, a portrait of him was painted 
by J. P. Knight, R.A., which is still one of the ornaments 
of the Council-room. Mr. Sandford is now living in retire- 
ment in his native county, Norfolk. 

Mr. Henry Sugden Kvans, who was elected to the presi- 
dency in 1869, wai a popular and able wholesale druggist, 
who had made his mark as a pharmacist, particularly in tht- 
Liverpool Chemists' Association, of which he had been one 
of the founders. The annual meeting over which he pre- 
sided in 1870 secured the unenviable reputation of being the 
most rowdy of the fifty, resulting almost in a free fight. A 
dead set against Mr. Kvans was made by some London 
chemists in consequence of a statement that his firm had 
supplied drugs to a co-operative society, and an unscrupu- 
lous attempt was made to falsify the records of the voting 
by a too-enthusiastic scrutineer, who was found out, and 
retired from membership of the Society. Mr. Evans spent 
the latter years of his life in Canada, and died at New York 
about three years ago. 

Mr. Sandford resumed office for another year in 1870-71, 
but in view of the opposition with which his policy as to 
poisons regulations was met he retired in April, 1871, and 
was succeeded by Mr. Adolphus F. Haselden.a pharmacist of 
Conduit Street, who was elected for the two following years 
also. 

Mr. Haselden was succeeded by Mr. Thomas Hyde Hills, 
the friend, partner, and successor of Jacob Bel). Mr. Hills 
retained office for three consecutive years. After him, 

Mr. John Williams also filled the chair for three years 
(1876-79). Though most of Mr. Williams's business life was 




THOMAS nBBHING. 



associated with the wholesale and manufacturing sections of 
tho trade, he had been a retail chemist, and always rct.rned 
his sympathies with those who practised that branch of phar- 
macy. His practical scientific acquirements were very 
marked, and he was a laboiious worker for the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society. 

Mr. Sandford was again called to the chair in 1879, and 
presided for one more year. Mr. Thomas Greenish was Pre- 
sident for the next two years, and Mr. Michael Cartcighe 
was elected in 1882, and has already been re-elected in ei?ht. 
successive years since. He has now filled the presidential 
chair for a longer period than any of his prcdecessora. 



516 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[Al.ril 18, 1891. 



aud, always exoaptiB$ Jacob Bell, it may also be said of him of Mr. Gilford, from a daguerreotype, which has been lent to 

that in labours he) A been' more abundant than any of them- the Pharmaceutical Society for a jubilee exhibition by his 

We give in this article sketch-portraits of all the pre- daughter ; the portrait of Mr. Thomas Herring is from a 

sidents of the Pharmacentioal Society from its foundation to photograph supplied by Mr. Ksme, of Brighton ; and the por- 

the present time, with he exception of Mr. C. J. Payne. No trait of Mr. Carteighe is a pen-and-ink sketch of the oil 

likeness of this gent] >man can be discovered. The portrait painting of him by A. J. Foster, exhibited last year in the 

of Mr. Allen is from an engraving lent by Messrs. Allen &; , Royal Academy, and lately presented by some fiiends to the 

Hanbury. The Rev. Dr. Ince kindly lent us a photograph Pharmaceutical Society. The sketch of the Crown and 

of his father, taken from an oil-painting in his possession. Anchor at the head of this article is from a water-colour 

Mr. Bemridge was good enough to let us sketch the portrait drawing by T. Hosmer Shepherd in the British Museum. 




RECOLLECTIONS OF JACOB BELL. By Joseph Ixce. 

My personal acquaintance with Jacob Bell was in connec- I The drawing-room in which the committee met was a- 

tion with the publication of the Pharmaceutical Journal, of | gallery of art. The walls were hung, or rather hidden, by a 

which he was both editor and proprietor. While a student collection of modern paintings, most of which have been 

in Paris I wrote a description of the Kcole de Medecine, , presented to South Kensington : conspicuous amongst them 

celebrated at that date for the lectures on chemistry by i were the " Derby Day " by Frith, and famous examples of Sir 

OrSla, and contrasted the enthusiasm there displayed with Edwin Landseer, Etty, and many other English artists, 

the still life, not to say apathy, shown at some of the ; The tea was good. 

courses at the Kcoie de Pharmacie. Mr. Bell saw this The mainstay of the committee was Professor Redwood, 

account, and had it rut up in type ; but it was too graphic ! fertile in suggestion, and a veritable storehouse of informa- 

in certain details, and very wisely was withdrawn. After my i-tion. Next came Daniel Hanbury, who spoke very little, 

return to London I was surprised one afternoon to see ' but who elaborated his papers, which were not few. until 

Jacob Bell enter Godfrey's old pharmacy in Southampton each one became a classic : and next John Barnard, whose 

Street. The occurrence was most unusual, and to my know- conscientious and untiring work and assiduous collection 

ledge was only once, repeated. I was engaged in the ordi- of material have scarcely received due acknowledg- 

nary course of dispensing, when, after a few words, Mr. Bell ment. 

said : " This is my Wednesday Journal Committee meeting ; The surprise I had felt at my first unceremonious intro- 

we have tea at my house in Langham Place — and you must duction was deepened on discovering the contrast between 

join." I said it was impossible, as I was not free; to which Mr. Bell's apparently frigid manner in public and his over- 

his only answer wa.^. ,; Where is your hat and coat?" He ; flowing geniality in private life. Neither forsook him. In 

fetched both, matte me put them on, get into his brougham, , the chair he appeared never able to shake off a peculiar chill 

and we drove horn With this curious introduction I was of mannerism, almost amounting to hesitation. By the 

enlisted in the service. fireside he was a different character: his pleasantry and 

The committee was a council of four, under the general power of entertainment wete as inexhaustible as his hos- 

direction of the e iitor. Two matters were unofficially ai- pitality. The business of the committee was interrupted by- 

ranged — the Compilation of the Journal for the month, and outside visitors who had no connection with pharmacy 

the supply of contributions to the evening meetings. Papers whatsoever: chiefly by Sir Edwin Landseer, who rippled 

of a purely literary character and correspondence were over with droll remark and conversation. " Now, I suppose, 

reserved for publication in the former ; while those of more 1 you must go," said Sir Edwin : " rammed up to the muzzle 

general interest to the members of the Society, and which with your speeches to be let off before the Society I " He 

admitted of discussion, were handed over to be read and put an adjective before the last word derived from the 

criticised, and officially inserted in the Transactions. Never animal kingdom. Of this great artist, but most childlike ofi 

^was work done amidst more pleasurable surroundings. . men, Mr. Bell told me the following story : 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



£47 



Landseer had to paint a little dog which sat, or rather lay 
down in a fitting pose, with all the patience of a Christian. 

When the sittiDg was over, the dog leapt down and made 
for the door. 

" Come again at three o clock," said the artiat. 

Away went the animal half-way down stairs. 

"No; at a quarter past three, please," said Landseer, but 
whether the model turned up to time, history docs not 
record. 

Dallas, of the Time", was another visitor, and occasionally 
Mr. Morson, who then and afterwards was standing counsel, 
dropped in upon the proceedings. 

Professor Bentley came later on the scene, and was pre- 
sent when the Editor had lost the power to speak, and com- 
municated all his thoughts in writing. 

There is very little to record in such personal recollections- 
In recital, and apart from living accompaniments, they fall 
flat ; yet they are grateful in 
the remembrance, though im- 
possible to realise in descrip- 
tion. 

I think the union of an es- 
sentially London life, with 
its amusements, social gather- 
ings, literary, scientific and 
artistic, and an absolute de- 
votion to the business of 
promoting pharmacy, was a 
distinctive point in the cha- 
racter of Jacob Bell. When 
a fresh Bill relating to 
pharmacy was in contempla- 
tion all other engagements 
were disregarded. Perhaps 
nothing was more character- 
istic than the undeviatiDg 
pertinacity and hopefulness 
with which these Bills were 
pushed through their several 
stages. Often disappointed, 
he never relaxed his efforts 
or lost hope of ultimate 
success. 

These documents seemed to 
follow him about, and to form 
part of the furniture of his 
study. He lived in the con- 
fident expectation that some day or other either he or a 
more fortunate successor would obtain full Parliamentary 
recognition, and that British pharmacy would gain a position 
at once legal and satisfactory. 

On the other hand, a minor matter disturbed him much ; 
indeed, the one anxiety I ever knew him to confess was a 
fear lest the evening meetings of the Society should fall off 
in attraction. Most commencements promise well, and 
British pharmacy was comparatively a new thing. 

Good papers were contributed by writers whose names have 
become household words ; the subjects treated of were of 
special practical interest ; while explanations given of various 
processes were more than new — in many cases they were a 
revelation. 

But would this continue ? Would there be a succession of 
men who Imr.w, and who would bo willing to communicate 
their knowledge ? 

Mr. Bell doubted this, and the doubt was not easy to re- 
move. While he himself was in the chair, and Pereira, 
Redwood, Deane, Morson, and 1 1 anbury were the speakers, 
the danger was not imminent, 



GEORGE WEBB SANDFORD. 



A curious episode took place with reference to this very 
subject— curious because it occurred immediately after one 
of the most successful sessions the Society had enjoyed 
1 will put it as nearly as possible in Mr. Bell's own words. 

It had been arranged that the evening meetings should be 
under the superintendence of a committee officially appointed 
by the Council, and that all papers should be communicated 
through Professor Redwood as the scientific officer of the 
Society. 

My father was President for the year : papers were abun- 
dant and the meetings wore well attended. During the 
recess, however, great dissatisfaction arose with the conduct 
of affairs in the minds of some private members, and they 
expressed their sentiments in no softened terms. 

Professor Redwood, they complained, was always in evi- 
dence ; a clique monopolised attention, and Mr. Bell assumed 
too much the guidance of affairs. Meanwhilo they, the 

private members, were 
thrown into the shade, and 
their latent talents were not 
disclosed. 

Mr. Bell risked the situa- 
tion, withdrew into the back- 
ground, and handed over tho 
entire control and manage- 
ment to the committee. 

The day for the opening 
of the next session was fast 
approaching : the committee 
did nothing ; no preparations 
were made ; not a solitary 
paper turned up, nor the 
ghost of a suggestion, and 
the reader wiU search in vain 
for the record of the meeting 
which ought to have been 
held in October, 1851. Mr. 
Bell and Professor Redwood 
were requested to resume 
their original positions. 

A careful examination of 
the subsequent reports of the 
Society, so far as they relate 
to this period, does not seem 
to me to show more than 
inevitable fluctuations. 

One thing was astound- 
in the light of the enthu- 
siasm evinced by the students of to-day. The labora- 
tory was crowded— the lecture-room persistently neglected. 
Now, the laboratory at that date was in the basement 
storey, terminated at one end by an old wine-cellar, 
with subterranean passages attached. The Underground 
Railway between Gower Street and the Edgwarc Road was 
arranged on the same principle. Owing to its structural 
position, odours of a permanent character condensed and 
settled; others of a more volatile nature aromatised the 
Council. We had frequent visits from our superiors wishing 
to know whether the original research on which we were 
engaged was absolutely essential to our education. Never- 
theless, the worse the accommodation the better was the 
work ; and Professor Redwood may look back on this period 
of his labours with unmingled satisfaction. 

In the face of this exceptional success, the non-apprecia- 
tion of the lectnro-room is difficult to understand. The 
younger generation disdained advantages which their elders 
would have gladly welcomed. This was discouraging and 
unexpected. The question was even raised as to whether 




ing, especially when .viewed 



548 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



the educational lectures should be abandoned. As a last expedient, it was 
suggested that they might be tlirown'open without fee, and thus a good attend- 
ance might be secured. 

Whereupon Mr. liell {Pharm, Journ., vol. viii., p. 572, 1848-9)'" made his 
celebrated short speech. He said: "The experience of the Council had led 
to the belief that the reduction of the fees would not have the desired effect. 
They were originally less than at present, and the .attendance was not very 
good. Then the Council doubled the fees, and the number of students in- 
creased. It was easy to take a horse to the water, but not so easy to make 
him drink. If young men had not the good sense to attend lectures at the 
moderate fees charged by the Society, they would not attend even were they 
paid to do so; and if they could attend for nothing they certainly would not 
take the trouble to come." 

Mr. Bell's literary style is so well known that comment is almost unnecessary. 
The mass of the leading articles in the first series of the Journal were written 
by himself. They are marked by vigour and originality, but are frequently 
too diffuse. 

He had great facility in composition — a 'gift against which a writer should 
be rigidly on guard. A leader should always finish where it ends — a statement 
in form paradoxical, but true. One of his happiest efforts was restricted to one 
page — "Adulteration and the Lancet" (Phariii. Journ., vol. xv., p. 244, 
1855-6). 

The writer himself liked it well ; so did John Baker Edwards, and so did I. 

Up to this moment I cannot trace his 
best aphorism, which probably was in a 
speech — " It is foolish to protect a dan- 
gerous spot with a'weak fence." 

No one is justified in revealing the 
secrets of the hearth. I shall not fall into 
condemnation in adding personal witness 
.to the courage with which he met his end. 
Suffering under a distressing affection of 
•the throat, he went on his accustomed 
course. The symptoms gradually but 
steadily increased : the result was certain, 
but his activity was unchanged. 

We have read of the ship which went 
down with all the men on board in perfect 
discipline and order. So died Jacob Bell, 
having awaited and prepared for the 
great change as calmly and with equal re- 
signation. 




Ikomas -("lyde -Hil 



THE 




MEETING AT THE CROWN 
AND ANCHOR. 

By One Who Was Thebe. 



Easter, 1891. 



Joseph Ikce. 




We have already mentioned Mr. Joseph 
Sidney Lescher as one of the survivors of 
the committee which was formed at the 
Crown and Anchor on April 15, 1841, to 
organise the then created Pharmaceutical 
Society. This gentleman has very kindly 
consented to dictate for us (through his 
son, Mr. F. Harwood • Lescher) a few re- 
collections of that meeting. Mr. Lescher's 
narrative is none the less interesting for its 
occasional digressions. It is as follows : — 
Although now in my 88th year, I well 
remember the meeting on or about April 15, 
1841 (it might have been in February of 
that year), that was the real commence, 
ment of the Pharmaceutical Society. A 
Bill was to be laid before Parliament by 
a Mr. Hawes, that would have brought 
chemists under the control and inspection 
this in the supposed interest and for the 



of the medical profession, and 
general safety of the public. 

But, the leading druggists of those days were alive to the threatened 
danger, and then thej'.wholesale men made common cause with them— 
perhaps 4 in a more, public and formal way than they do at the present day 
Possibly tU,i chemists, not yet united, were glad of the support of the 
large London wholesale firms ; ,ww the Pharmaceutical Society can well walk 
alone. This meeting, held in a large room at the Crown and Anchor, Fleet 
.Street, was well attended. I went there with several others of the wholesale 
trade as representing my firm. John Stable was a wholesale druggist of 
27 High Holborn ; ^then the firm became John Stable. Junior, of Lambeth 
Hill; then, taking in John Evans, it became Stable & Evans, of Wood Street 
When I took Stable's place it was, in 1835, Kvans & 
Street, and afterwards of Cripplegate Buildings, and 
Close, where the firm became Evans, Lescher, & 
Evans, Lescher & Webb. 

Mr. John Evans was at one time in the firm that was successively Kempson 
& Hermon, of Snow Hill; then John Kempson: then Kempson, Yates, 
Parkmson, Brown ft Roper; then Kempson, Yates, Evans & Parkinson; then 
J\emp8on, \ates k Co., of Budge Row. 

But I stray from my subject : you must excuse the garrulity of my eighty 
eight winters, of which this one, not yet ended, seems one of the longes 



Lescher, of Wood 
then Bartholomew 
Evans, and afterwards 



Arm 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



549 



I had served my articles with Jenks & Wheeler, who 
did a large business in spices, tea, &c, as well as drugs; 
one of the partner-travellers boasted that he could sell 
something to every tradesman in a town. It was in these 
early days that an apprentice in my recollection being re- 



brokers not agreeing to certain allowances, for months we 
abstained from bidding for castor-oil. 

We were well represented at this meeting. Richard H. 
Pigeon was a leading man in our trade, and in the City 
he was treasurer of Christ's Hospital. 




John 'Williams 

quired to make some mixture and refusing, said : " It 
would be adulteration, and this is contrary to the Bible." 
Said his master : " There was no drug-trade when the Bible 
was written." We have certainly made great progress in 
purity of drugs since those days. I don't remember any 
exact prices in 1835, but 
I recollect that about 
1825 we paid 40s. per oz. 
for Sulphate of Quinine ; 
18s. per drachm for Ace- 
tate and Sulphate of 
Morphia ; 7s. per oz. for 
Iodine ; 9s. per oz. fcr 
Hydriodate of Potass, and 
25s. per drachm for 
Strychnine. Compaiing 
price lists (few and far 
between in those dajs) 
then and now, medical 
men knew of and used 
but few drugs then, and 
rang the changes princi- 
pally on rhubarb, senna, 
calomel, opium and cas- 
tor oil. I am told that 
in the last ten years 
nearly 500 new articles 
have been added to our 
materia medica. I think 
physic cured as many 
then as now, but I am 
also sure that improved 
sanitary science, better 
drainage, better nursing, 
more skilful care for the 
sick, saves many lives 
that would in those days 

have been lost. The wholesale drug-trade was very united at 
that time ; there was a drug club, where we used to dine 
-together and discuss trade matters. Amongst other things, 
this led to the fortnightly drug sales ; and once, owing to 





"fi-io ma~> Greenish. 

The brothers Herring (Thomas and Thrower) were 
amongst the first to emphasise the purity and excellence 
of drugs and preparations. Their powders began the 
onward movement up to the present position of the English 
wholesale trade, where one house competes against another 

in giving the very finest 
articles to chemists. If 
the pharmaceutical ex- 
aminations have raised 
the status of the latter, 
surely the wholesale 
trade have led the way in 
excellence and purity of 
drugs and their prepara- 
tion. Thomas Herring; 
generally drove down 
from his house in Rosslyn 
Hill, Hampstead, which 
is still standing. Richard 
Battley lived then oppo- 
site to me in Pond Street . 
Hampstead, and we were 
great friends. Charles 
Barron, tall, thin, and 
handsome, of much in- 
fluence amongst us, and 
Charles Davy, a busy, 
pleasant man, the senior 
partners in Barron, Har- 
veys &; Co., and Davy, 
McMurdo & Co., were 
also there. One of the 
Homers was there ; they 
had a large business in 
original packages of 
drugs. Thomas Keating 
and Samuel Foulger also 
were there, as wholesale druggists. John Ellis represented 
Langton's ; S. de Castro (Keating's partner) was there ; 
R. Farmar, the vitriol-maker of KonniDgton ; William 
Allen, F.K.B. (first President of the Pharmaceutical Society), 



550 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1391. 



Mr. Barry (from Allen k Hanburys), and Thomas Butler, of 
Cheapside. 

The leading men of the London retail chemists were: 
W. Ince, of Godfrey and Crooke, whom everybody liked ; 
E. Winstanly, of Cheapside, whose business was afterwards 
taken by Corbyns ; Charles Dinneford, an able man ; G. W. 
Smith, who became the first secretary of the Pharmaceutical 
Society ; George Waugh, a man of fine appearance and a 
good speaker, but who did not like opposition to his views ; 
and last, but not least, Jacob Bell, who was one of the 
leaders of the movement. He was a man of great culture 
and polished manners, and his services were invaluable. 

Messrs. Morson, Squire and Savory were not at this meet- 
ing, but joined the movement afterwards ; the two former 
took a forward position in the early ranks of the Pharma- 
ceutical Society. 

This memorable meeting was unanimous in its opposition 
to Mr. Hawes's measure ; it showed the strength and union 
of chemists and druggists, wholesale and retail, and led to 
the formation of the Pharmaceutical Society, to the first 
council of which I was nominated, and of which I was, 
therefore, one of the founders. 

(Signed) Joseph Sidsey Leschee. 

Hampstead, April 14, 1891. 



jpbarmamtiical Storitig rjf <&real $riiab. 



FIRST OR PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION. 
Questions set on Tuesday, April 14. 

LATIN. 

(Time allowed— From 11 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.) 
f. For all Candidates. Translate into Latin : — 

1. Many things are done by one man. 

2. We all ask you for peace. 

3. They said nobody would be able to help him. 

4. Cajsar warned them not to help the enemy. 

5. The word being given, our men made an attack upon 
the Gauls. 

II. Translate into English eitlier A (Caesar) or B (Virgil). 
{Candidates must not attempt both Authors.) 
A. Caesab. 

1. Caesar, quoil memoria tenebat, L. Cassium consulem occisum, excrcf 
tumquc ejus ab Helvetlls pulsum et sub jugum missum, concodenduin non 
putabat : neque homines inimico animo, data facultate per provinciam 
itineris faclundi, temperaturos ab injuria et maleficio existimabat. Tamen, 
ut spatiam intercedere posset, dum milites, quos imperavcrat, convenirent, 
tegatis respondit, iliom se ad deliberandum Bumpturum. 

2. Haec eodem tempore Caesari mandata referebantur, et legati ab 
Aeduis et a Treviris veniebant ; Aedui questum, quod Harudes, qui nuper 
in Galliam transportati essent, fines eorum popularentur ; sese ne obsidi- 
t>U8 qaidem datis pacem Ariovisti redimere potuisse ; Troviri autem, pagos 
centum Suevorum ad ripara Rheni consedisse, qui Rlieoum transire cona- 
rcntur ; his praeestc Nasnam et Cimberium fratres. Qaibus rebus Caesar 
vchementer cjmmotus maturandnm sibi existimavit, ue, si nova maiuis 
Suovorum cum vetcribus uopiis Ariovisti sese conjunxisset, minus facile 
rcsisti posset. 

Grammatical Questions.— For those only who took Caesar. 

1. Decline throughout, in the singular, dura manvs ; in the 
plural, vrteribus copiis (Par. 2). 

2. Give the first person singular of the indicative mood, 
perfect tense, of all the verbs in paragraph 1. 

3. Write in Latin 7, 36, 475, 4th, 28th, twice, three apiece. 

4. Distinguish between ne, nonne, and mini, in asking 
questions. 

B. Virgil. 

i. Olli subridons hominum sator atquo deorum, 

Yalta, quo coelum tempestatcsque seren»t, 
Oscnla Iibavit natne ; deliinc talla fatur : 



"Farce metu, Cytheiea ; manent iinmota tuorum 
Fata tibi ; cerncs urbem et promi>sa I.avini 
v Mini, suhlimemquo feres ad sMera cocll 
Mngnaniinum Acncam ; neque me sententia vertlt." 

2. Namque vldcbat, utl bell ante- Pergama circum 

Hac fugerent Qraii, premcrct Trojanu juveutus ; 
Hac Phrygcs, in.-.taret ourru cristntus Achilles. 
Neo procul hinc Rhesi uivcis tentoria velis 
Agnoscit lacrimans, prlmo quae prodita somno 
'J'ydidcs multa vastabat caede crnentue, 
Ardentesque avertlt equos in castra, prlus quam 
1'abula gustassent Trojae, Xanthumquc bibisscnt. 

Grammatical Questions. — For those only who took Virgil. 

1. Decline in full and give the genders of tempestates, 
oscula, natac, moenia, cocli (Par. 1). 

2. Give the first person singular of the indicative mood, 
perfect tense, of all the verbs in paragraph 2. 

3. Write in Latin 7, 36, 479, 4th, 28th, twice, three apiece. 

4. Distinguish between ne, nonne, and num., in asking 
questions. 



ARITHMETIC. 

(Time allowed— From 12.30 p.m. to 2 p.m.) 

[The working of the questions, as well as the answers, 
must be written out in f ull."| 

1. Find the sum of all prime numbers from 100 to 150 
and write the result in Roman characters. 

2. An iron merchant buys 16,008 tons of iron at HI. 13s. Qd. 
per ton ; he sells half of it at cost price, half of the re- 
mainder at a profit of \d. a lb., and the rest at a profit of 
\d. a lb. ; find his gain. 

3. Simplify (12g - 8? - + &) x 4| x (7& - 6i). 

4. A pile of 33 books is 4 tt. 8 83 in. in height ; find the 
average thickness of each book. 

5. By how much is 35 m. 7 centim. less than the average 
of 34 m. 2 decim., 37 m. 8 decim., 36 m. 9 decim., 35 iu. 
7 decim., 36 m. 6 decim., and 34 m. 8 decim. ? 

6. Find the cost of papering a room 25 ft. 8 in. long, 
19| ft. broad, 14 3 ft. high, with paper 2 ft. 5 in. wide, at 
Zjd. a yard. 

7. If 100 8 lbs. of flour support 20 men for 3 days, how 
many men will 46 305 cwt. support for 7 35 weeks ? 



ENGLISH. 
(Time allowed— from 3 r.M. to 4.30 p.m.) 

1. Analyse the following: — 

Fair ship, that from the Italian shore 

Siilest the placid ocean- plains 
With my lost Arthur's loved remains, 

Spread thy full wings, and waft him o'er. 

2. Parse fully : " In words, like weeds, I'll wrap me o'er.' 

3. Correct the following sentences, giving your reasons : — 
(i.) Saying and doing is a very different thing. 

(ii.) If I had drank the mixture I would have recovered, 
(iii ) He referred to the smallest of the two memoran- 
dum. 

4. In the following passage supply the necessary capital 
letters, and put in the stops and inverted commas where 
necessary : — pray my young ' friend said he as they grew 
familiar together what may i call your name why i am 
very nimble as you see answered the traveller so if you call 
me quicksilver the name will fit tolerably well quicksilver 
quicksilver repeated philemon looking in the traveller's face 
to see if he were making fun of him it is a very odd name 
and your companion there has he as strange a one 

*5. Write a short composition on one of the following 
subjects : — 

(i.) The mental and physical values of outdoor games, 
(ii.) The advantages which Britain derives from her 

insular position, 
(iii.) Any historic building you have seen, 
(iv.) " Sweet are the uses of adversity." 



* This must be attempted by every candidate. 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



551 



NORTH BRITISH BRANCH. 

A meeting of the Executive was held in Edinburgh on 
Wednesday, Mr. William Gilmour in the chair. Messrs. 
James Mackenzie and Adam Gibson (Edinburgh), Alexander 
Strachan (Aberdeen), J. H: Fisher (Dunfermline), William R. 
Kermath (St. Andrews), James Watt (Haddington), Charles 
Kerr and James M. Hardie (Dundee), S. Lawrence (Oban), 
David Storrar (Kirkcaldy), and John Nesbit (Portobello), 
were also present. 

Examinations in Orkney and Shetland. 

Mr. Hill stated that, as directed, he had forwarded to 
the Council the recommendation of the Executive at last 
meeting, that examinations should be held in Orkney and 
Shetland in the same manner as they were carried out in 
Guernsey and Jersey. He had received the following reply 
from the Society in London : — 

" I am instructed to say, in reply, that the subject will be taken 
into consideration when the centra* of examination have been 
determined next year." 

Mr. Watt : The Council will consent if it is at all prac- 
ticable. Take Shetland, for instance : there is communica- 
tion in the winter only twice a week. 

Mr. Strachan : But four times a week in summer. 

Mr. Watt : That was the only reason why it was de- 
layed — in order that proper arrangements might be made. 

Mr. Strachan : Well, the mails are to be increased now. 

Mr. Fisher : I think it will be very important to have one 
centre in Kirkwall. It is only a matter of some eight or ten 
Siours' sailing from Lerwick to Kirkwall. 

Mr. Strachan : There is no reason why the examinations 
should not be held in both towns. 

Mr. Kermath: Who would they propose to appoint in 
•Kirkwall 7 

Mr. Fisher : There is Mr. Stewart, a very good man, and 
a pharmaceutical chemist. 

Mr. Kermath : Then, I think, we should request them to 
make arrangements as quickly as possible. 

Mr. Watt : You have to consider the whole arrangements 
in connection with such an appointment. For instance, 
"Wick was talked about. There is regular communication 
■with Wick, but the matter is in the meantime delayed. 

Mr. Mackenzie : Oh, Scotch geography is not very well 
understood in London. (Laughter.) 

The Chairman : I think we can safely leave this matter 
in the hands of our Scotch members on the Council. 
(Hear, hear.) 

Mr. Watt : I may mention that there is a great desire on 
.the part of the President to carry out this suggestion. 

The Election of the Executive. 
■On the motion of the Chairman, it was resolved : — 

That the next election of the Executive take place on Wednesday, 
June 17, and that the chairman and vice-chairman be appointed 
scrutineers of the voting papers, with power to add to their 
number. 

The Executive then sat in committee. The annual report 
<to the Council was read by the assistant secretary and 
ordered to be forwarded to London. 

The Pharmacy Acts Amendment Bill — The Executive 
and the Glasgow Assistants. 

Mr. Kerr said he had a communication from Mr. J- 
Walker, Glasgow, in reference to some matters that the 
assistants of the city were considering under the Pharmacy 
Acts Amendment BiU. They desired that unqualified as- 
sistants who had been fifteen or ten years at the trade 
should be registered without examination to remain as assist- 
ants. They were getting up a protest against the Bill now 
before Parliament, and they had printed a circular to be 
sent to members of Parliament to induce them to have an 
amendment introduced so as to obtain the privilege they 
desired. 

The Chairman thought they should not take up this 
matter for discussion. It was not for them to take it up as 
an executive. 

Mr. Storrar said they could only take it up as a mere 
matter of information. 

Mr. Watt asked why as an executive they could not take 
tip the question .' They need not put themselves in the posi- 



tion of parlies antagonistic to the 111., but they might 
express their opinion upon it. 

Mr. Stobbab : The question is — Car. we take up as an 
executive a proposal to petition for or regain st this Bill / 

Mr. Kerr : It is only information I r.ir: going to give you 
as to what is being done outside. 

Mr. Mackenzie : I see Mr. Gilmour s difficulty. Finish 
the business, and the chairman can leave the chair. We 
can then discuss the question competently. 

Mr. Watt • This is a question which is likely to seriously 
affect the position of the Bill before Parliament, and are we 
going to ignore it and deny ourselves the privilege of dis- 
cussing it ? In my opinion this is r. matter which the 
Executive should take up. The Executive I presume to be 
either in favour of or against this Bill, and here is a serious 
matter which the assistants propose to raise in connection 
with it. Now I think it is a very seriots subject for us to 
discuss. 

Mr. Storrar : I would not like to be misunderstood. If 
it is simply to discuss what is being done, I think it is a 
very proper subject to be brought before the Executive, but 
I understood Mr. Kerr to ask this Esecutive to approve 
or disapprove of this circular, and take pr.rt in the assistants' 
action. 

Mr. IvERR : Oh, not at all. I enly bring the matter 
before you for your information as to what is being done. I 
got a letter asking me to send the ircular to the mem- 
bers of Parliament for Dundee, which I have done, and 
received replies. 

The Chairman : So far as I am concerned, I have not the 
slightest objection to the document being read : but, as an 
executive, to have a discussion on a circular which we have 
never seen, I think it out of order. 

A Memrer : This matter is not on the billet. 

Mr. Fisher : But any matter may be brought up. 

Mr. Nesbit : I do not think it would be proper for us to 
give an opinion upon this question. Some may agree, and 
some may be against the proposal. We should take neither 
one side nor the other. 

The Chairman : We are discussing what we know nothing 
at all about. 

Mr. Storrar : I propose that this matter be discussed in 
committee. 

Mr. Watt : I really must oppose it being taken in com- 
mittee, as it is an important matter affecting the trade. 
(Hear, hear.) 

Mr. Storrar : I propose that we should be in committee. 
We are not discussing a public question. We are discussing 
whether certain business should be taken up by the Execu- 
tive or not. In the meantime I do not see why it should be 
sent all over the country, whether a certain thing should be 
taken into consideration or not. 

Mr. Mackenzie: Will you tell us upon what rule, Mr. 
Chairman, you decide this discussion is irrelevant? 

Mr. Storrar : I beg again to move that we go into com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Nesbit seconded. 

Mr. Watt proposed that the matter be considered in 

public. 

Mr. Fisher seconded. 

On a division, 5 voted for Mr. Storrar's motion and 4 for 
Mr. Watt's amendment. 

The discussion, which was of short duration, ended, we 
are informed, in no action being taken in regard to the 
Glasgow petition. 

The Approaching Jubilee. 

On business being resumed in public, 

Mr. Strachan said he had heard it mentioned in Aberdeen 
that there was good reason why there should be a celebration 
of the pharmaceutical jubilee in Edinburgh as well as in 

London. . , 

The Chairman asked if their representatives at tne 
Council could inform them what was being done. 

Mr. Storrar said there was to be a reception in the 
Society's rooms, which would develop into a conversazione, 
and a dinner afterwards. I 

Mr. Mackenzie : Of course that is the thing. (Laughter.; 

This initiated a short conversation, and, on the chairman s 
suggestion, the matter was left to the new Executive. 

This was all the public business. 



552 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 




44 



GOLD MEDALS 1884-1885-1886-1888. 



D 



Mmm 

ISINFECTANTS 

LurtfeHt Haie in tlie World. 

SANITAS OIL," f° r Inhalations in Lung and Throat Complaint!. 

KINCZETT'S MERCURIC BACTERICIDE. 

IIIBZETT'S PATENT PRESERV ED PEROXIDE OF HYDR08EN, 

f Pamphlet*. Particvlara, Prices, Showcards, and Billt, on application to 

THE SANITAS CO., LIM.JethnaUreen, LONDON, E. 

SHOW CARDS, 24x17 or 17x12, 
Fuee to any address in the United Kingdom. 




See First Page, facing inside of front of cover, In the 
tlrst Issue of the month for latest particulars. 



\J"LuXcb 



PATES'IS JiXl) Til A I>K MASKS. 

W. P. THOMPSON & CO, P.CS, M.'s I.M.S., &c, 
6 Lord Street, Liverpool ; 6 Bank Street, Manchester; 63 Long Bow, 
Nottingham ; and 323 High Holborn, London*, W.O., Chemical and 
U-eneral Patent and Trade Mark Agents. 

MANUALS OP INSTRUCTIONS URaTF«. 




■jfaMii'jL^ 



Write for Price 

List No. 14. 
B. NOAKES & CO. 

Doeklty Road, 
Bermondsey, Londor. 



SI LIC AT ED CARBON 

FILTERS 

PATENT SELF-AERATING 

MOVEABLE BLOCKS* 




CASCARA 

IN ALL FORMS. 

SELECTED MATURE BARK 
AND PREPARATIONS. 



Through Wholesale Homes, or direct from 

JOHN MOSS «& COTT 

Makers of Galenicals and Medicinal Chemicals, 
Galen Works, Wilson St., NEW CROSS ROAD, S.I. 

SCHWEPPE'S 

TABLE 
WATERS 

51 BERNERS STREET, LONDON, W. 



(.FARRINGDON ROAD, LONDON, E.C.) 

PURE i 0 cwt. ic 56 lb. & 1 cwt. bags-, 

CRUSHED LINSEED 18S. 



PURE 

STARCH POWDER 

In 1 cwt. and 4 cwt. bags, at 26/ cwt. 
In 7, 14, and 23 lbs., at 28/ cwt. 

PURE 

FULLERS EARTH. 

FINB6T Levigateil, 1 owt. and i owt , 
16/ owt. ; in 7, 14, & 28 lbs , 18"/ cwt 
Fine Levigated, 1 cwt. & i cwt., 14 
cwt. ; in 7, 14, & 28 lbs., 16, owt. 



or in 14 k 28 lbs. 19 - cwt. 



CARRIAGE PAID 

To Railway Stations in 
England, or half to Scotland, 
Ireland and Wales, on parcels 
of a total weight of not less 
than 1 cwt. 



SAMPLES POST FREE 

CARRIAGE PAID. 



IF YOU WANT BRILL'ANT SYRUPS, USE 






OTES. 



THE JUBILEE OF THE PHARMA- 
CEUTICAL SOCIETY. 

The Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain reached its- 
fiftieth birthday on Wednesday last, sound, it may be 
added, in mind, body, and estate. We have thought the 
occasion appropriate for giving a brief sketch, of. the origin. 



A Copy of this Supplement is inserted in every number issued of "The Chemist & Druggist J" 



««ni jgQPPDEmEDT 



Businesses Wanted. 
Businesses for Disposal- 
Premises to Let. 
Auotion Sales. 



SATUEDAY, APRIL 18, 1891. 



Partnerships. 
Situations Vacant. 
Situations Wanted. 
Miscellaneous. 



NOTICE. 

Copies of tho SUPPLEMENT TO THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST (containing advertisements of Situations Vacant arid 

Wanted, Businesses for Disposal, &c.) of April 25, 1891, 

WILL BE SENT TO 

EVERY CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST IN BUSINESS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

AND WILL BE SUPPLIED 

FREE TO ANY ASSISTANT WHO APPLIES FOR IT PERSONALLY, 

A COPY WILL ALSO BE POSTED TO 

ANYONE CONNECTED WITH THE TRADE WHO SENDS A STAMPED ADDRESSED 

WRAPPER FOR IT. 

Advertisements for this Supplement can be received on Friday morning, first post, though it is requested that they may 

be sent in as early in the week as possible. 



MESSRS. ORRIDGE & CO., 32 LUDGATE HILL, E.G. 

CHEMISTS' TRANSFER AGENTS, 

May be consulted at their Offices on matters of SALE, PURCHASE, and VALUATION. 
The business oonduoted by Messrs. Omiidqk Si Co. has been known as a Transfer Agency since the year 1846, and is well known to all the leading 
firms in the Trade. VENDORS have the advantage of obtaining an opinion on valne derived from extensive experience, and are in most cases 
enabledto avoid an infinity of trouble by making a selection from a list of applicants for purchase, with the view of submitting confidential particulars 
to those alone who are most likely to possess business qualifications and adequate means for investment. PURCHASERS who desire early information 
regarding eligible opportunities forentering business will greatly facilitate their object by describing clearly the class of connection they wish to obtain. 

L-IiONDOlf, N.W.— Established Business, situate in a main ! 8.— SURREY.— Dispensing and Retail, with Post Office attached ; 
road ; returns over £930, largely cash; well-fitted shop and good stock ; returns between £750 and £800 yearly ; profits fully up to the average; 
convenient house, held on lease ; price £750. 

2. — LONDON SUBURB— Old-established Business, situate in a 
pretty locality; returns £1,000 yearly, with very good profits; well- fitted, 
large, convenient shop ; good house and garden, held on .beneficial ease ; 
particulars on application. 

3. — LONDON, SE— Old- established Business, situate In a very 
busy locality ; returns £500 yearly ; Post Office attached ; house held on 
lease at low rental ; double-fronted shop; convenient house ; price £475. 

4. — LONDON SUBURB.— Good locality; Retail and Dispensing 
Business; established nearly 20 years; returns £950, yearly increasing ; 
net profit 33 i>ercenl.; gool 8-roomed house and attractive shop on long 
lease ; price about £900. 

5. — LONDON, N.— Dispensing and Retail ; established 50 years ; 
returns between £800 and £900 yearly ; net profit very much above the 
average, from Proprietaries ; good stock, handsome shop, and good house, 
held on beneficial lease ; price, including good lease, £1,100. 

6— KENT— Dispensing and Retail Business, with good Proprietaries ; 
returns over £800 yearly ; single-fronted shop and good 8-roomed house, 
with small garden ; price £650. 

7.— DEVONSHIRE (DE&.TH VACANCY). — Very old- 
established good-class Business ; returns nearly £500 yearly with good 
stock j shop well fitted ; large house ; business open to tho fullest investi- 
gation; immediate sile is roquired, and the oxecutors will accept any 
reasonable offer. 

Particulars of any of the above will be furnished on application. 

jvj i3 _ NO CHARGE TO PURCHASERS. 

Other Businesses, Town and'oounfy. particulars free on applloation. Porsonal applloants roooiva Mossrs. O. Si Oo.'s direct attention and 

' dTi0e ' TBR e M r sToR d VAl!bATION ON APPLICATION. APPOINTMENTS BY POST OR WIRE H*VB M"™*F^ 

Me.irs.ORnir.OK 4 Oo. Invite communications from COLONIAL and FOREIGN firms whoro business of a confidential nature requires wrewpwm 
attention of a London agent. . . _____ . ____ 

SPECIAL NOTICE-TO PRINCIPALS AND ASSISTANTS 
Messrs. Orridge & Co. Register Vacancies for Situations FRhL Ob UriAKuiu. 
Vacancies for one or two .^ood men now open. 

O BRIDGE. & CO,. 32 Ludgate Hill, LONDON, E -° 



slngle-'ronted shop and good house, with private entrance, garden, Ac. ; 
rent £60, on lease ; about £650 required, or valuation can be nrranged 
if wished. 

9— EASTERN COUNTY.— Easy distance of town: an Agricul- 
tural Business, well-situated in a central position ; returns £1.650 yearly ; 
profits fully vp to average ; valuation of stock and fixtures only required ; 
full particulars ou application, 

10.— LEICESTERSHIRE.— First-class Country Business, esta- 
blished many years ; returns £800 yearly, good profit ; handsome shop, 
large and convenient warehouse and garden ; price £700. 

11 —MIDLANDS.— Mixed Business, situate in a good busy manu- 
facturing town ; returns £1,800 yearly ; capital opportunity for a good 
business man ; price about £8:0. 

12 —BRIGHTON.- -Good -class Retail and Dispensing ; returns £700 
yeariy ; well-fitted shop and good stock ; good 6-roumed house, on lease i 
price about £980. 

13 — NOTTINGHAM.- Light Retail and Prescribing Business, 
established many yoirs ; returns betwoon £425 and £4E0 yearly; corner 
shop ; very moderate rental ; about £200 required. 

14.— CORNWALL.- Dispensing and Retail Business, situate in a 
small town, pleasantly situated ; returns over £300 yearly, easily extended I 
no opposition ; good-sized house, with gardon ; rent £20 ; price £250. 



THR CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. April 18, 1891 



F. J. BRETT, 

VALUER, LEICESTER, 

60 St. Stephen's Road. 
References to vrincival London and Provincial Wholesale Bouses, also to 
numerous clients throuuhout the United Kingdom. 

BUSINESSES THOROUGHLY INVESTIGATED FOR BUYERS. 20 YEARS' EXPERIENCE. 

Stocktaking Unnecessary. — Stocktaking is always dreaded by 
Chemi»ts, and with u competent Valuer is not necessary. 

P. l. Biiktt is prepared to estimate or to value entire stooks as they 
stand with little or no inconvenienca to ordinary business, and has re- 
peatedly done so with entire satisfaction to those adopting this mode. 
Srncts and Fixtures B'USHT for Cash. 

MIDLANDS.- Returns £1,100 ; good General trade, capable of con- 
siderable extension ; price £450, or valuation. 

WALES.— Unopposed profitable Retail; returns over £400; good 
house, garden. &c. : rent £16 ; price £225. 

LANCASHIRE.— Returns £350; negleoted through illnes3 ; good 
spf cialities ; price £200 or va'uation. 

LONDON, N.W.— Dispensing and Light Retail; over 1,000 new 
prescriptions per annum : returns £700 ; price £5S0. 

LEICESTERSHIRE.— Good Family Retail :_large house with 
garden, lawn and greenhouses ; returns £800 ; price £650. 

YORKSHIRE.— Light Retail in large village ; returns £700; net 
profit £250; piice £600. 



MESSRS. BERD0E& GO. 

CHEMISTS' TRANSFER AGENTS & VALUERS, 

30 JEWRY STREET, ALDGATE, E.C. 

Established 1670. 
VALUATIONS and TRANSFERS conducted in any part of 

the United Kingdom. Twenty years' practical experience: Terms, wla'.oU 
are strictly moderate, may be had on applicati ,n. 

NO CHARGE TO PURCHASERS. 

ESSEX.— Market town: Retail, Dispensing, and Agricultural trade ; 
returns £2,0C0 : net profit £500 : price £1,200, part remain. 

KENT.— Market town ; Retail, Dispensing, and Prescribing; returns 
£850 ; net profit £350 ; goad house ; price £650, or offer. 

BOURNEMOUTH.— First class Retail and Dispensing Business; 
returns £600 ; capable of development ; good house; price £50 \ 

MIDLANDS. — Retail and Dispensing ; same hauis 50 years ; 
retiring ; returns £1.500; net profit £600 ; price £1,300. 

MANCHESTER (near).— Retail, Dispensing, and Prescribing; 
returns £1,200 ; rent £35 ; price, valuation, about £700 ; owner retiring. 

SURREY.- Large town ; Retail, Dispensing, and Prescribing ; rct.irns 
£760 : net profit £3C0, under management ; price £525. 

KENT (15 miles out).— Retail and Dispensing; returns £500; 
increasing: P.O. attached ; good house; price £425. 

WEST OP ENGLAND.— Unopposed ; Retail, Dispensing, and 
Prescribing ; returns £650 ; rent £30 ; good house ; price £380, or offer. 

BDCK8.— Market town; Retail and Dispensing Business; returns 
£830, increasing ; good house ; price £750 ; trial allowed. 

WILTSHIRE.— Retail, Dispensing, and Agricultural ; returns 
£1.200: good profits; 10-roomed house, garden ; price £800, or valuation. 

MIDLANDS.- Retail and Prescribing Trade; returns £7:0; net 
profit £300 : good home and garden ; price £500 ; trial allowed. 

BUS SEX —Retail and Dispensing Trade ; returns £700 ; Bame hands 
27 tears ; price £500 : partner taken with £250. 

LONDON, S.W.— Retail and Dispensing Butiness : excellent 
poiition : returns £750 : capable of increase ; good profits ; price £500. 

LONDON, W.— Retail and Dispensing; returns £400 as branch; 
T.O. navs rent ; good house ; price £253. 

LONDON. N.— R»tail and Dispensing; returning £400 under 
assistant : pood house and garden ; valuation only, about £200. 

NEW RADFORD AND BRIXTON.— We desire to cn'l the 
special attention of buyers to these Businesses, offered for sale by Tender 
in another column. 

Particulars of any of the above sent free on application. 

Other Businesses, Town and Country, from £100 to £5,000. 

Messrs. Berdoe & Co., 30 Jewry St., Aldgate, London, E.C, 



BUSINESSES FOE DISPOSAL. 



3*. 6d. for fifty words ; 6d. for finery 10 words beyond. 



AT a sacrifice, through death of proprietor, a genuine old-established 
country Retail Business; returns £3C0. J. E. Bury, Chemist, 
Burford, Oxon. 



A SMALL Profitable Busiuess In North London, now under manage- 
ment; lease at £50; moro than half lot oil' ; easy Wins to pur- 
chaser. C. A., 218 Kentish Town Road, N.W. 



LONDON. North ; main road; best position ; returns £850 under 
management; severe illness the cauie of disposal; handsome 
modern shop ; good stock; price £600; inspection invited. L., 62 Uprer 
Tullington Pari, N. 



FOR immediate disposal, an old-established Retail Ding and Prescribing 
Business, in a Lancashire manufacturing town; good house 
attached; returns last year over £900; price £550. Address, "Opium," 
care of Mesirs, Evans, Sons & Co., Liverpool. 
1Q2. 



Messrs. CROCKER & CO. 

Trade Valuers, Transfer Agents, and Accountants, 
15 WALBROOK, E.C. 

EASTERN COUNTIES.— An old-established Retail and Dis- 
pells ng Bui iucss, in best part of market town ; returns £650 ; price £150. 

HOME COUNTS.— Light Retail and Dispensing; returns £4(0; 
low ren' : price £320 ; large and convenient house, with nice garden. 

DEVON.— 0:d-establiibed Retail and Dispensing, with good sale of 
own Specialities ; returns £600 ; price £450 ; good bouse and garden. 

KENT.— Family and Dispensing trade, wi'h Post Office ; returns over 
£800 ; price £600 ; large house and garden. 

B UCKS. -LightRetail and Dispensing; very low rent ; returns £450; 
price £350 ; good house and garden ; worth attention. 

MIDL A NDS.— Retail, Dispensing and Prescribing; returns £500; 
price £200 ; double-fronted handsome pharmaoy. 

WEST OP ENGLAND (fashionable health resoi t). — Old- 
established Retail and Dispensing ; returns £1,200 ; price£l,200. 

SURREY— Light Retail and Dispensing ; returns £800 ; prioe £650 ; 
good house ; handsome pharmaoy ; agency pajs rent. 

KENT.— Good class Family and Dlppensing; returns £350; prioe 
£700 ; long lease at a low rent ; good house. 

YORKSHIRE. — Family Dispensing and Prescribing trade in 
suburb3of large town; returns £300; price £700; rent £10; good home 
and garden. 

ESSEX.— Light Retail, Dispensing and Prescribing trade; returns 
£720 ; price £675 ; rent £45 ; 11-roomcd house and large garden. 

L A.N CAS HI RE.— Good class General Country Retail and Dispensing 
Business; iu same hands many years; returns £1,303; rcjt low; price 
£700 ; open to i easonable offer ; worth attention. 

CHESHIRE.— Old-established Country trade ; returns £1,000 ; price, 
valuation only ; large and convenient house ; rent £40. 

HANTS.— Light Retail and Dispensing; returns £400, and increas- 
ing ; large and convenient premises, held on brg lease at a very low 
rental ; price £200. 

LONDON, N. (Main Road).— Good-o'.ass Retail and Dispensing ; 
returns £4C0, and can be doubled with ordinary attention ; prioe £203 to 
a quick buyer. 

LONDON, SE.— Retail and Prescribing trade; unopposed position ; 
returns £500 ; price £400 ; rent £40 ; good house, &c. 

LONDON, 8.E. — Suburb.— Retail and Dispensing; handsomely- 
fitted, double-fronted shop ; returns £1,400; rent £50; price £1,100; ora 
Partnership would be entertained, with a view to present owner retiring. 

LONDON, S.— Good-clau Retail and Dispensing trade; returns 
£500; low rent; prior; £350; capital position in marketing thoroughfare. 

LOND ON, N.— Old-established Retail, Prescribing, and Dispensing ; 
many jears in same hands ; returns £570 ; price £500. 

NO CHARGE TO PURCHASERS. 

VALUATIONS A SPECIALITY. TERUS ON APPLICATION. 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL — Continued. 

A GENUINE Chemist's Business for Sale ; a bargain ; owner going 
into medical ; returns about £ 150, under manager ; rapidly in- 
creasing neighbourhood ; every investigation given. Address, " Leo," 
OIceofTHE Chemist and Dhuugist, 42 Cannon Street, E.C. 

DEATH VACANCY.— For disposal, owing to death of proprietor, a 
small Retail Business at Wisbech, Oanibs ; rent £16 or purchase; 
in lute proprietor's hand* 50 years ; stock anl fixtures at valuation, which 
would be low on account of long illness of late proprietor. Bobbins, 
Walioken, Norfolk. 



FOR DISPOSAL.— Hereford ; an o'.d- established Dispensi ig, Family 
Retail, and Agricultural Business ; situated in the bc3t position in 
the Ci y; thorojghly genuine-, and every investigation offered; satisfac- 
tory reasons for disposal ; immediate po3sestion may be had. For full 
particulars apply tj Morris, Chemist, Hereford. 



£1 | /"X —Retail and Prescribing Business; making £100 yearly 
I I vi net profit guaranteed ; no patents sold; good- class 
suburb, S.W.; low rent; good house; owner aooepted appointment; 
must sell at once ; thi.d could remain ; we'l fitted ; stoak worth £50 : seo 
this at onoe. Address, "Bargain," Office of Tbb Chbmist axd Diiuqqist, 
42 Cannon Street, E C. 



r> I A "7 Q average annual returns the last 3 years, at a good 
I )T J O profit, may be increased by parsonal attention ; Dis- 
pensing, Prescribing, and gooi general Mixed Trado in the best Agricul- 
tural district in Cambridgeshire ; established upwards of EOyoara ; present 
hands 23 years ; price £1,200. Apply, " Sound," Harvey, 6 Ull'spur Street, 
and Umtey, 50 Southwark Street. 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE.— Unopposed Retail. Dispensing, and Pro- 
scribing Business ; returning ££00 ; vent £23 ; house has niuc good 
rooms; population, 5C00, selling solely through illness; prioe, £400, or 
reasonable offer ; gcod opening for dentistry ; evu-y proof given as to 
bond fid'"- " Fcirum," OSce of TllK CEUIIBT AND DnuaoiST, 42 Cannon 
Street, P.O. 



TO be disposed of immediately, a fine Pharmacy, situated In one of 
the great Sraport and Commercial centres of the East ; will be 
fold at a laci iflce, ns proprietor Is desirous of devoting himself to another 
buslr.ois ; the value of Installation and stock of drags and specln itlts was 
at Inst inventory £2,000, aid the annual turnover has been an equal 
amount ; a cash payment of £500 would be required, and terms could be 
arranged regarding payment of remainder of purchase money. For 
further information, apply to " Orient," care of 8. R. Tan Duzer St Son, 
114 <fe 116 Southampton Row, W.O. 



April IS, 1891. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. 



SITUATIONS OPEN— Continued. 



GOOD Assistant ; aged about 25 ; aooaitomod to nrst-olass business ; 
two kept. Apply, Hardcastlo & Co., Brighton. 

IMMEDIATELY, for good-olaM Dispm3lug business, qualified 
Assistant ; indoors, Parkcs, 193 Belsiae Roid, Kilburn. 

COUNTERMAN (indoors); about 25 ; oish business, N.W. ; liberal 
salary. Apply, stating experieucs, &c, to J. H, L$wts, 22 and 24 
Great Portland Street, W. 



JUNIOR Assistant, accustomed to a Mixed business ; outdoors. Stita 
age, height, oalary required, when disengaged, and give references, to 
R. Mumtord, Chemist, Splotland, Cardiff. 

AN active Junior Assistant for a good and quiok business; 10 p.m. ; 
good references indispensable. Apply, witn carte if posslblo (to be 
returned), stating height, salary required, to Corfe, Chemist, Maidstone 



JW. DENNIS & SON, Dispensing and Faintly Chemists, require 
■ a Junior Assistant (Indoors) at once for the Counter ; applicant) 
must not be under 23 years of age ; state age, height, silary, &c, with 
refereucs. 



WANTED, an energetic young man, with knowledge of the Drug 
trade, to assist Traveller in representing a Wholesale firm in the 
Midlands. Apply. 172 30, Offloe of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 CaDnou 
Street, E.C. 

JUNIOR or Improver wanted, qniok and active, not afraid of work, 
in a g cod-class Dispensing business. Apply, with particulars of age, 
refereooe, <fcc, to J. W. Feltwell, 91 Hammersmith Road, West 
Kensington, W. 

IMMEDIATELY, an Assistant, about 22 years of age ; indoors ; 
accustomed to good-class business, and well up in Dispensing. Apply, 
ktating age, height, salary, and references, to J. Sunday, Chemist, 
1 High Street, Cardiff. 



A QUALIFIED Senior Assistant ; must be good Dispenser and Sales- 
man, competent and trustworthy ; please state details of experience, 
age, height, salary required (outdoors), when disengaged, and if possible 
send c. de V. (to be returned) ; three Assistants kept ; short hours. Join 
Brew, 10 Chnrch Street, Great Malvern. 



IMMEDIATELY, smart Junior or Turnover (requiring permanency), 
of good address, for Retail, Dispensing, and Photographic business (or 
branch); industrious, obliging, and tiustworthy; Tooth-extractor, Pre- 
scribcr, and good Salesman preferred. State age, height, experience, 
outdoor salary, &c. (enclosing photo and references), to " Pharmacy," 
73 Freeman Street, &o., Grimsby. Also outdoor Apprentice wanted. 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



1*. for twelve words ; fid. for every six words leyond. 

PART-TIME ; 12 years' experiencj ; Prescriber ; Extractor. D., 73 
High Street, Gravesend. 

ASSISTANT; 23; Lancashire preferred ; abstainer; references. 
J. R., 355 Bolton Road, Darwen. 

OUTDOORS; Minor qualification ; short hours ; London. "Sigma," 
53 High Street, Stoke -N'ewington. 

JUNIOR ; 21 ; disengaged ; 7 years' experience. Sldobottom, Ontlow 
Hall, St. Oswald wistle, Lancashire. 

LOCUM-TENENS or Manager ; qualified ; aged 37 J abstainer. 
L. J. B., 3 Woburn Place, Russell Square, W.C. 



AS Branch Manager or Ajslstant ; good rcforenccj ; qualified ; aged 26. 
E. 8 B., 150 Great Knolly's Street, Reading. 

AS Assistant ; 8 years' experienoo ; aged 26 ; good referenoee ; abstainor. 
" Rhef," 3 Wyndham Street, Bryanston Square, W. 

AS Assistant ; aged 20i ; 5 years' experience ; London preferred ; satis- 
factory references. u Cymro," 67 Walton Street, Oxford. 



AS Junior; atfe 21; height, 5 ft. Sin. ; abstainer; Bournemouth pre- 
ferred Apply, Blakeley, The Phnrmaoy, Pokesdown, Bournemouth. 

LOCUM-TENENS or temporary Manager ; country preferred ; quali- 
fied, steady, and reliable ; uighe«t references. " Extruotor," 23 
Florence Rood, London, S.E. 



JUNIOR, aged 22, as DIaptnsor; good references. D. B., 33 Fentlman 
Roud, Clapham. 

LOCUM-TENENS; lUcngaged early in May. "Locum," Trinity 
Square, Llandudno. 

Tl/1 AN AGER or Assistant j qualified; disengaged, 0., Mr. Williams 
1 » 1 174 New Kent Read, S.K. 

JUNIOR or Improver ; aged 20 ; good references. Wellburn, 31 New- 
port Road, Middlesbro". 

LOCUM-TENENS ; disengaged Thursday ; qualified. ".E'culap/ 
32 Laurel Grove, Penge. 



WHOLESALE or Manufacturing House, as Assistant. D. Lloyd, 
Temple Street, Wolverhampton. 

LOCUM-TENENS; aged 24; disengaged; qualified; Extractor. 
50 Seymour Street, St. John's, S.E. 

IMMEDIATELY; aged 29; experienced. "Jure," Office of Tan 
Chemist and Druggist, 42 Camion Street, E.C. 

AS Dispenser; 7 yeare' firet-olass experience; highest references; 23; 
disengaged May 2nd. " Alpha," 10a Ohanclos Street, W. 

MANAGER ; Dispenser ; 23; married; permanency; disengaged 
snortly. By letter, "Cnemist," 19 Gough Street, Birmingham. 

TO Manage a Branch ; can Extract Teeth, <fcc. ; qualified ; married ; 
good Prescriber ; aged 40. '• Chemicus," 14 Gerrard Street, Aston, 
Birmingham. 

AS Braceh Manager ; good Dispenser, Prcsoriber, and tooth extractor ; 
married (£7)j good references. "Bowen," 69 Hsgley Street, 
Stourbridge. 

1V| ANAGEMENT, with \iew to early purchase for cash, Neglected 
111 Business; good main preferred. "Extractor," 8 Praed Street, 
Po/ldlngton, W. 

mAJOR, experienced, desires engagement, Manager or Senior ; good- 
class trade; locum-tenens or permanency. Munro, Barnard's 
Green, Malvern. 

TRAVELLER ; 9 years' experience North and Midlands ; good con« 
uection ; salary or commission. Fletcher, 115 New Park Road, - 
Salford, Manchester. 

|U| ANAGER, Senior or Loculn-tenens ; 26 years' cxperienoe ; London 
111 preferred; disengaged, 27/14, Office of The Chemist and Drug- 
gist, 42 Cannon Street, 1S.U. 

AS Assistant to Medical Man, or Chemist's Manager ; aged 39 ; married • 
over 20 years' varied experience; testimonials mo3t praiseworthy. 
Address, " Statim," 53 Upper North Street, Poplar, E. 

DISPENSER and Bookkeeper to Surgeon, qualified and experienced, 
desires engagement, permanent or temporary, In or near Town. 

X,, Office of The Chemist and Dhugqist, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 



ASSISTANT or Manager ; Lancashire preferred ; over 12 years' 
varied experience; married; good address, Prcsoriber, Dispenser, 
and references ; 5 ft. lOJin. Address, Mountoastle, La Motte, S>. Holier. 

AS Junior in a good Retail and Dispensing business, or Dispenser to a 
Dootor; aged 21; b\ years' experience; height 5 feet 8 inches. 
' Rhei," Office of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.C. 



AS Assistant in good Lordou Dispensing house, with 3 hours a day 
for study ; small salary ; Minor qualification ; excellent references ; 
nged 30. " Dens," 8 (Jucon Street, Edgware Road. 

AS Manager; permanent or otherwise; ago 40; married; qualified; 
highest references ; oan take ohargc of dentnl surgery ; registered 
and dental hospital experience. " Dons," c/o Mr. Crocker, 15 Waibrook, 
E.O. 

• 

REQUIRED, Situation with a respeotablc Ohomist, affording every 
opportunity of improvement; a good Dispenser; premium If 
rcqnircd. Apply, "Statim," care of Andrew, 9 BIsliopton Lane, Stockton- 
on-Tees. 



TRAVELLER, with good and safe connection successfully worked, for 
iiO years in South Wales, &c, will shortly bo disengnged, and open 
to ic-engngcnient on commission or otherwise ; can inllueuce trndo for 
rcspcctablo house ; thoroughly acquainted with nil branches of tho trade, 
wholesalo and retail, lloferoncoa and full paitioulara, "Druggist," 
7 Orlohton Street, Cardiff. 

106 , 

***** '01 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. April 18, 1891. 



SITUATIONS OPEN. 


/""\ U A I.I F'IKD Assistant wanted for good-olasa business (outdoors); 

no. 'in rt.iiir,* tu tujjuriur mail* run purticuinis to \». 11 xt., wniutf 
of The Chemist and DnuaiiiST, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 


Zs.Qd.for fifty words ; Qd. for every 10 words beyond. 


1*/ ANTED, Indoor Assistant, between 20 and 30; muit be gool Toot** 

W V v t m ft m" nl in 111 VH tjnmi |.jrnrnii/>ii j Am.l.r otat Inn a era 1 1 r 

» *■ a\ mwfi , niiu uivc i^uuu reiureiice * . Appjy, siainig age, ueigui, 
and salary, to W. Aspinall, Chemist, 56 Market Place, Wigan. 


A 8SISTANT. about ii, accustomed to Dispensing. Apply to H. T. 
/\ Griffith, 10 Victoria Street, Clifton, Bristol. 

A MANAGER or qualified Assistant for a Branoh Business ; one with 
l\ view to purohase preferred. Wjles, 1 New Bridge, Dover. 


II/AN TED, by May Uth, a Junior Astistant, indoors j one having fn.1l 
VV completed his apprenticeship preferred. Apply with full pir un- 
bars to Dixon & Co., Ohcmi sts, 3 Excharge Walk, Nottingliaro. 


i ■ r a v*rrrt of nnna a minllAoH \~ii-ftnf rn k u r,<lpr ? ^ fiPrn^tnrnf il to 

W a gocd Country trade. Fletcher, Chemist, Retford, Notts. 


| MPROVER or Junior As Bistant in a Mixed Country business App'y, 
I with partionlars of age, experience, salary required, &o., enclosing 
carte (Churchman preferred), to Chap. H. Bradsbaw, Tic). hill. Roth°rham, 

Wf ANTED, by leading provincial house, thoroughly reliab'e 
VV Assistant, in or out doors. Apply, enclosing photo and full parti- 
culars, to 'Nottingham," care of Barron, Harvcys it Co., Qiltspur Street, 
London. 

|Uf R. STAMP, Hampstead, N.W., is in immediate vam of a compc- 
1 1 1 tent Dispense r ; one wdth qualification would have the preferencs ; 

(Indoors) ; short hours ; comfortable home. Address, ns above, eii'.'lo>iug 

photo, if possible. 

/QUALIFIED Assistant; permanent and indoor; familiar with go-.d 
\J£ class Dispensing and Retail ; age about 25. Applicants will please 
state height, salary reiuired, referenoe, experience, *c, to Mesirs. Georfro 
* Welch, Woic:ster. 


11/ ANTED, bd active Junior (outdoors). State re r erence and salary 

W r O Pnttfloro T-rrtTT mnnol hip PliPini^t 117 PrinPPS StrVPfc Fdin- 

W W LU J. 1./, X I'Ltilt^Uj J I l) J.> 1. UJfilLlllb.- l> 1ICUJ13V) 1X1 X IIUliO LI T 

burgh. 


AAf ANTED) an Assistant, aao ut 21; abstainer ; mint be ob.iging 
WW and trtt'tworthy - stato full particulars. Pearoe, Chemist, 
Tavistock. 


A SSISTANT, qualified (indoors), wanted for Mixed business. *pply, 
*■» stating salary, with references and photo, Coleman, Chemist, Wolver- 
hampton. 


JUNIOR Assistant required, at once, for a London house (outdoors). 
Apply by letter, and in own handwiitiog, J. Ford, 70 lvennington 
Park Boad, London, S E. 

A COMPETENT and trustworthy Assistant, who has been accustom :d 
m\ to first-class business. State age and salary required, with references, 
to Bradley & Bliss, Reading. 


\Af ANTED, general indoor Assistant for Mixed trade ; good Tooth 
VV Extractor essential, and not afraid of work ; Thursday half- 
holidiy ; enolose full partioulars, and photo (retnrnab'.e). Cooper, B Mars- 
land Street, Stockport. 


|-\ISPENSER (qua 1 tied) required at the Hajmarket Stores ; hours 9 
U to 7, Saturdays 2.30 ; outdoors. Apply by letter only, stating salary 
aud all partioulars to " The Chemist," Civil Service Co-operative Society, 
28 Haymarker, London, S.W. 


A N Assiitant, about 25 years of age : good references indispensable. 
m\ Apply, Hating salary required, to Franois Swift, Chemist, 33 Chats- 
worth Road, Clapton Park, LondoD, N.B. 


PJRUGOISTS' SUNDRIES. — Wauted, a Young Man for the 
mJ General Sundries Department; state age, experience, and salary 
required. Ayrton & Saunders, Liverpojl. 


A T once, good Counterman (indoors), about 23, for brisk cash business, 
m\ N.W. ; liberal salary to suit ible hand seeking permanency. Apply, 
stating experience, ic., to X., Messrs. Hodgkinson Si Co., 101 Whiteoross 
oLreeTr, i. ' . so vauaLcy 101 uujurb i 'i-jm ..> _r 

CENIOR wanted (outdoors) ; not under 25; good General business: no 
O Sunday or night work ; Warehouseman and Apprentices kept ; 
hours 8 to 7.40, Saturdays 10 ; good salary to suitable man. Reply, with 
full particulars, to R. Fell, King Street, Huddersfield. 


1 UNIOR Assistant ; well up in Dispensing and Family Retail. Apply, 
V stating age, height, reference, salary required, enclosing pho'o, and 
when disengaged, to John Lei, Folkostono. 

\Af ANTED, Dispenser; abstainer (outdoors); daily, 130 to 2 30 aud 
ww 5 30 to 9.30, Sundays 2 to 3; salary 15*. 6 J. weekly. "Dr.," 101 
Northcote Road, Olapham Jnnotion, London, S.W. 


\WESTGATE ON SEA.— Immediately, a competent qualified As- 
W sistant, of good address, for a first-class Dispensing business j must 
be gentlemanly, obliging, and trustworthy. Apply, with height, carte, 
and references, to F. K. Bessant, Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

\Af ANTED, a good Junior Assistant ; indoors; tccustomed to gcod 
W class Retail aud Dispensing business. State age, height, reference, 
salary required, and enclose, if possible, carte de visite (which will be 
returned), lt 1'narmacist," 100 Burlington Street, Manchester. 


1 UNIOR ASSISTANT (indoors) ; qualified ; not under 23 ; must have 
" had first-class Retail and Dispensing experience. Apply, with full 
particu'ars, to Brady Si Martin. Newcastleon-Tyne. 


/"QUALIFIED Assistant for Light Retail acd Dispensing; to live at 
and take charge ef business premises ; houn moderate. Send full 
paiticulars, with references, to Oeley, Chemist, Stroud. 


lyl AN wanted in Manufacturing Laboratory ; good references indis- 
111 pensable. Apply, stating age, ralary, and experience, to A. 0., 
Office of Tue Chemisi' and Dhuggut, 42 Cannon Street, B.C. 

/QUALIFIED Assistant wa'.ted ; mudt have fitst-olass references, be 
V««J able to extract teeth, and have a thorough knowledge of Agricul- 
tural business Apply to J. McCall White, Wigton, Cumberland. 

ASSISTANT (indoors) by21stinst.; Lijht Retail nud Dispelling; 

Mm hour-i 8 till 9 ■ S'ltlirflfiv* Infcpr • hn^f rtnv nff Pimh ujop L- nnn iHith i to 

Sunday duty. Full particulars tj Cooper, 17 High Road, Balham. 


OL-ACKFOOL.— Shortly ; indoor Assistant; good moral character; age 
D not under 21; medium height ; a conscientious man of fairly gojd 
abilities and experience will find a considerate employer and hen thy, 
comfortable home all the year round. Jackson, Chemist, B.ackpooL 


f-^ISPENSER required immediately for a firm of Surgeons; must be 
mJ steady and reliable in every way, and have gold refereaces ; salary 
to commence at £80. Apply b 7 letter to Mr. Huish, Overhill, Lordship 
Lano, S.E , cr call Saturday between 12 and 2 at 300 High Holborn, W.C. 


OUTDOOR Assistant required ; mmt ba a competent Dispenser, and 
\J accustomed to a good class business; with Minor q lalifioa'-iou 
preferred ; no Sunday duty. Apply, stating ago, height, s.i'ary required, 
and roterenccs, and enclosing cxrte dc visltc, to W. T. Hicks, 25 Parade, 
Cardiff. 


1I7ANTED, at once, qualified Assistant to manage a branch ; salary 
ww and commission; must be reliable and trustworthy. State full pur- 
ticulars and references to J. Vivian Williams, Chemist, Plymouth. 


\KJ ANTED, an Assistant about 26 to manage a branch ; Dispensing, 
WW Prescribing, and Light Retail ; salary £50. Addrcs, with par- 
ticulars and references, to J. Woodcock, 75 Shaw Stre.t, Liverpool. 


lUIESSRS. PAYNE & ADAMS, Shrewsbury, require an Assistant 
111 at the end of the month for the Retail counter ; not under 24, and 
must have had experience in a good-class business. Applicants are re- 
quested to state age, height, salary expected (indoors), and to euoloso 
photograph. 


A COMPETENT, trustworthy Junior Assistant of good address, 
r\ accustomed to Prescribing and Retail ; must be able to extract 
teeth. Mr. J. D. Pidgeon, 6 Lewisham High Road, New Cross, S.E. 


/QUALIFIED Assistant, not under 30, Christian Nonconformist; 
V_4 used to best class Dispensing business,. and travel occasionally ; 
seeking permanency ; man of quiet energy ; South of Eagland. Ad3res<, 
preliminary particulars to ' Sencx," c/o Edwards & Son, 157 Queen 
Victoria Street, L'ndou. 


A SSISTANT; Minor qualification; must bo a quick and aoenrate 
*\ Dispenser and good Counterman ; state age, height, reference, and 
enolose oarte. Milton 4c Son, Pharmaceutists, 246 High Btreet, Exetor. 


f"\ENTISTRY.-A vacanoy for Pupil in above is open for smart Lad, 
U 16 to 18 years old, for surgery and mechanical ; relerences given both 
m dical and chemical. Thos. F. Green, Dentist, 113 Leytonstoue Roai, E. 


A QUALIFIED Assistant wnntod the, middle of this month; one 
rt seeking permanency prefeired ; an accurate and qui :k DispenEer, of 
good address and obliging business habits ; must have had good t».vn ex- 
perience. Apply. Btating age, height, and ta'ary required, to H.. 175 West 
End Lane, West HimpUead 

n/1 ANCHESTER — Wright & Bainaby, Pharmaceutical Ch mists. 

Ill 223 Oxfoid Street, rcqniro an indoor Assistant about 24 years of 
age ; mu-t have had experience in a goad Dispensing business ; two 
assistants and an apprentice kept ; state age, height, n-Ury. when at 
liberty, and enclose carte. Apply to Mr, Bariiaby. 


\AJ ANTED, immediately, Indoor Dispenser; aged 25; Ironworks 
WW practice; salary, £30. Apply, enclosing carte and reference, to 
" Caradoc," Office of The Chemist and DntJGOisT, 42 Cannon Sticet, B.C. 

\Af ANTED, Junior or Improver for the Summer Season (ou doors) ; 
ww engagement could be entered upon at once; state age, salary re- 
quired, ic, to H. J. Jackson, Pharmaceutical Chemist, Bridlington Quay, 
i r\A — . 



The Chemist & Druggist." 



BURROUGHS, WELLCOME <Hf? 

A Copy of this Supplement is inserted in every number issued of ' 

3L\IBHARY _ , t 



QPPIiEflffi ftT 



Jlusinesses Wanted. 
Businesses for Disposal. 
Premises to Let. 
Auction Salos. 



SATUEDAY, APEIL 11, 1891. 



Partnerships. 
Situations v acant. 
Situations Wanted. 
Miscellaneous. 



This Supplement will be given free to any Chemist and Druggist or Assistant who will call for 
It at 42 Cannon Street on Friday afternoon, or will be posted on Fridays to any one who sends 

an addressed postal wrapper. 

OFFICE S : 42 CJ5.1»JiMO^T ST., LONDON, E.G. 



-THE CIRCULATION of this Issue of "THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST" SUPPLEMENT amounts to 



I 



12,650 COPIES, distributed to as many Chemists and Druggists in Business. This 



is the Largest and Most Influential Circulation of any Medium addressing the Drug Trade, and for 
that reason Chemists and their Assistants should not fail to advertise their wants in it. Advertise- 
ments for this Supplement should bs sent by Thursday of eich week, although we can receive them 
by prst post on Friday mornings. 

MESSRS. ORBIDGE & CO., 32 LUDGATE HILL, E.C, 

CHEMISTS' TRH.N3PER AGENTS, 

May be consulted at their Offices on matters of SALE, PIJRSaASS, and VALUATION. .... 
The business conducted by Messrs. Ouridoe ii Co. has been known as a Transfer Agency siuco the year 1345, and is well known to all the leading 
firm T in the Trade? VENDORS have the advantage of obtaining an opinion on value derived from extensive experience and are In 
erTbl dto avoid an infinity of trouble by making a selection from a list of applicants for purchase, with the view ot mbm.tt.ne confident 
to tho»e alone who are most likely to possess business qualifications and adequate means for investment. PUUCHAShRa w ho desire early m orma tion 
reprdtagTgibleopportu^ bydescrlbtn? dearly tne ola^ofjonnect.on they w.sh to obtain. 

1.— £950.— LONDON (near 



the Bark'.— Dispensing and 
Retail ; "capable ot very largo development ; pre'ent returns £S50 yearly ; 
£1 000 required ; applicants must send trade card or reference. 

2 -£850 -LONDON, N.— 1nod-c'a«s Dispensing Business : very 
handsome shop ; returns about £850 yearly ; very profitable j capital 
house, with yard and warehouse, held on beneficial lease ; prico to be 
arrange]. 

3— £725 —LONDON, N.- Good-class Dispensing and Ititail ; 
situate in a' good middle-clam locality ; returns £725 ; largo haidsome 
shop and good house ; price £700. 

4— £950 -LONDON SUBURB. E— Very good-class Dis- 
pensing Proscribing, and Retail ; very nicely-fitted shop, and good house ; 
returns 'over £950 ; easily worked ; profit! exv pt'onoMy good ; comf ortablo 
house ; price £850. 

5 _£i goo —LONDON, S —Within eight miles of Charing Cross. 
—Very good class Dispensing Business ; no heavy trade ; very pretty 
locality - good residential neighbourhood ; returns £1,030 yoirly ; tery 
profitable ; good house and garden ; rent low ; held on lease ; termi on 
application. 

g _£i Q5o —ESSEX.— Easy distance from town.— Old-established 
Businc-s; commodious shop; good house nnd garden; returns from 
business amount to £1,650 yearly, aith goad profl's : vondor, having othor 
engagements, will accept valuation of stock and flxt.\rcs. 

7.— £900. — LANCASHIRE. — Very old-established Business; 
returns over £S00 yearly ; large double-fronted shop and commodious 
house (may be rented or purchased) ; price £725, or, if preferred, valuation 



-£8C0.-IJ!IDLAND COUNTY.-Good chss Family Busi- 
ness : returns £100 yearly, vry <J"Ot profit; some good Proprietaries 
include! : large haudsimo shop and gaud rciidcuce, With garden, &c; 
prioe £7C0. 

9— £850.- SEASIDE (South Coasti. — Fashionable town; 
fir=t-clasa Pharmacy ; returns between £850 and £S00 yearly ; the business 
cemiscs possess evcy convenience for high-o'nfs work, and thee is a 
good residence ; terms and particular! on application ; card or reference 
requeued. 

10— £800 —SUSSEX.— Dispensing and Retail; returns last year 
£800, increasing; do itnc-iiuntcd slop and commodious house, with garden 
and conservatory ; very pritty situation ; price £650. 

11 —SOUTHERN COUNTY.— Good-class Retail and Dispensing 
Busiiic" situate in a urst-class residential locality; returns nearly £700 
yearly ; very handsome thop nnd good house ; lent Ion ; prico £oo0. 

12 —£725 - SURREY" — Uasv distance from London.— Capital posi- 
tion' in a largo town ; Retail and Dispensing Business, capable of very 
large extension; returns over £725; good house with privats eutranoe ; 
piice £530; full investigation. 

13 -£300 or £400 -MANUFACTURING TOWN, N.- 
Vary Ola-established Business, capital situation tor extending ; heavier 
trade Drysaltery, &o. ; no goodwill required: vacation of stock and fix- 
tures only required, or lump sum if wished ; vcudor going abroad. 

is ^99^ — S0EREY.— Unopposed Business; capital position; 
has been nmcii neglected: about £225 required; good opportunity ioro 
branoh or for the investment of small capital. 



of stock and fixtures. • 

Particulars of any of the above will be furnished on application. 

N.B.-NO CHfl.RGE TO PURCHASERS. 

Other Businesses, Town and Count-y ; particulars free on application. Personal applicant, receive Messrs. 0. & Oo.'s direct attention 

' dTiCe ' SViMW&ATIOS ON APPLICATION. APPOINTMENTS BV P03T OR '^^^SSS^iS£^^» «p..W 

Messrs. Oubidok & Oo. invite communications from COLONIAL anl FJllEIGM Ur ns wliere business of a oonddoutlal uatare roiwro,. 
attention of a London agent. 

SPECIAL NOTICE.-TO PRINCIPALS AND ASSISTANTS. 
ridge & Co. Register Vacancies for Situations h ULL 01? WIAKAjl,. 



Messrs. Orridge 



Vacancies for one or two good men now open. 

QBEIDGhl & CO., 32 Ludgato Hill, LONDON, E.C 



01 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. 



April 11, 1891. 



VALUER, LEICESTER, 

60 St. Stephen's Road. 
References to principal London and J'rovincial Wholesale Ilouiei, also to 
numerous clients throuahout the United Kingdom. 

BUSINESSES THOROUGHLY INVESTIGATED FOR BUYERS. 20 YEARS' EXPERIENCE. 

Stocktaking Unnecessary. — Stocktaking is always dreaded by 
Ohemiits, and with a competent Valuer is not ncjcssiry. 

F. J. Brett is prepared to estimate or to v.ilue entire stocks as they 
stand with little or no inconvenienca to ordinary business, and his re- 
peatedly done so with entire satisfaction to those adopting this mode. 

BIRMINGHAM. -Light Retail and Prescribing; returns £453 ; 
net piorlt £;00; price £3:0. 

LANCASHIRE.— Lirge town; returns £3C0; good position for 
pushing trade ; valuation £250 ; open to offer. 

NOTTINGHAM.— Prescribing. Retail, and Dispensing; returns 
£600 ; vendor going abroad ; price £300. 

WILTS.— Old-established Retail, with Gilbey's agency; healthy 
town ; returns £1,300 ; price about £800, or at goodwill and valuation. 

BIRMINGHAM. — Small business ; only requires personal atten- 
tion ; price £60, less than value of fixtures. 

MIDLANDS.— Returns £650; good General trade; large hou3e 
and shop ; valuation about £500. 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL, 



3s. 6d. for fifty words ; 6d. for every 10 words beyond. 



AT a sacrifice, through failing health ; a small genuine Retail and 
Prescribing Business, in N.W. district. B. W. Willows, Frauds & 
Butler, 101 High Holborn, W.C. 



LONDON, North, main road, best position ; returns £850 under 
management ; serious illness the cause of disposal; lease 14 years ; 
handsome modera shop; goid stock; price £600; inspection invited. 
It, 62 Upper Tolliugton Park, N. 



PATENT Medicine and Drug Store Business; main thoroughfare; 
London, N. ; good opportunity for qualified Obemist to add Dispens- 
ing; present returns about £25C0. 31/72, Offlos of The Chemist and 
Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 



FOR immediate disposal, an old-established Retail Drug and Prescribing 
Business, in a Lancashire manufacturing town; good house 
attached; returns last year over £903; price £550. Address, "Opium," 
care of Messrs. Evans, Sons & Go., Liverpool. 



OFFERS wanted.— To be sold under exceptional circumstances, 
nucleus of a first-class Business ; handsomely fitted and well stooked ; 
established 3 years; good house and garden; moderate rent. X. Y., 
Office of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, B.C. 



A GENUINE Chemist's Business for Sale; a bargain; owner going 
into medical; returns about £150. under manager; rapidly in- 
creasing neighbourhood ; every investigation given. Address, " Leo," 
Office of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.O. 



SOUTH OF ENGLAND.— A good-class Business of a very profitable 
nature, making a return of £SO0 yearly; price £6C0; large well- 
fitted shop, good stock ; no heavy trade ; low rent ; 9 room3, small garden ; 
satisfactory reasons for selling. Address, " Carbo," Office of Thk Chemist 
and. Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, K.C. 



LONDON CHEMISTS.— A small Business, established 8 years, for 
Sale, situated iu a densely-populated neighbourhood; corner shop, 
neatly fitted ; suit a gentleman with limited nimns; incoming very low 
to an immediate purchaser; no opposition near. B. B., Office of The 
Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.C. 



LANCASHIRE.— In a good business town, Retail, Dispensing, and 
Prescribing Business ; returning £1,20?, at excellent prices ; low 
rental ; convenient house and business premises ; owner, retiring, will 
ncccpt £700 or valuation ; strictest investigation offered. O. S. D., Office 
of The Chemist and Diuggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.C. 



EASTERN COUNTIES.— Old-establiscd Retail, Prescribing, and 
Dispensing Business ; same hands 17 years ; owner retiring ; returns 
last year £340, and increasing; price £180; long lease; rent £14; good 
garden, with lawn and fruit trees; investigation courted; no agents. 
"Carbon," Office of The Chemist andDbuooist, 42 Cannon Streot, E.G. 



X» RAO average net profit last 3 years ; one proprietary nearly £100. 
9w v/vO — For sale, Light Retail and Prescribing, ready-money 
Business, showing aborc ; situate main thoroughfare. London, E. ; esta- 
blished nearly a century; rent, on lease, £15; house small; vendor 
retiring ; cas'i price, 2 years' profit; every investigation courted; no 
agents. Ciciar, 53 Bedford Street, Mile End, IJ. 



/[TO averngo annual returns the lust 3 years, at a good 
• ^ t O profit, may he increased by personal attention: Dis- 
pensing, Prescribing, nu<l good general Mixed Trade In the bjst Agricul- 
tural district iu Cambridgeshire ; established upwards of 50 years ; present 
hands 23 years ; prtou £1,200. Apply, " Sound," Harvey, 6 'iiUapur Street, 
and Umncy, 50 Southwarlc Sued, 

62 



Messrs. CROCKER & CO. 

Trade Valuers, Transfer Agents, and Accountants, 
15 WALBROOK, E.C. 

EASTERN COUNTIES. -Au old-established Hetail and Dis- 
pensing Butiness, in best part of market town; returns £650; prioe £160. 

LANC AS HIRE. -Death vaoanoy.— Returns £500; valuation of 
stock and hxtuica will be accepted to effect a quick sale. 

YORXSB IRE— Mixed trade, in suburbs of busy manufacturing 
town; returns £b'C0; price £7(0; worth attention. 

NORTH OF ENGLAND. — An old-established Family and 
Dispensing trade, with wines and spirits ; returns £1.1.0 ; price about 
£700 ; strongly recommended as a safe and reliable investment. 

SOUTH CO AST.— Light Retail, Presoribieg.and Dispensing trade ; 
returns under very iudiStcrout management £330; prioe £125. 

LONDON, N.E.— Good-olass Family and Dispensing trade ; retnrm 
£720 : low rent ; price £675 ; worth attention. 

LONDON, S.E— Suburb.— Retail and Dispensing; handsomely- 
fitted, double-fronted sltop ; returns £1,400; rent £50; price £1,100; or» 
Partnership would be entertained, with a view to present owner retiring. 

NO CHARGE TO PURCHASERS. 

VALUATIONS A SPECIALITY. TERMS ON APPLICATION. 



BUSINESSES FOR DISPOSAL — Continued. 



OLD-ESTABLISHED Drug Trade, Retail and Prescribing; good 
town. South S raffordthire ; commanding shop; good house; no 
goodwill. 156/2, Office of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon St., E.G. 



CHEMISTS And Druggist*' Business, with Post Office attached, 
N V. . district of London; much neglected; takings £11 weekly ; 
populous neighbourhood. Apply, K., Messrs. Hojgkinson, Prestons it King, 

81 Bishopsgate Street Without. 



FOR DISPOSAL, with immediate possession, a well-stocked Chemist's 
Shop, eltuated in a good position ; splendid opportunity ; satisfactory 
reasons. For particulars address B. M, Office of The Chemist aid 
Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 



/»4 0C -SOUTH OF ENGLAND.— Good-class Retail and 
OL» ■ ■ Dispensing Business, in a fashionable seaside town ; 

good position ; satisfactory reason for dl«po3al. Address, "Rhei," care of 
Messrs. Hodgkinson, Treacher & Clarke, 101 Whiteoross Street, London, E C. 



AN old-established Business in Surrey, doing a select Retail and 
Dispensing trade only; no cutting; returns about £500; large 
house, garden, and etivoling ; on lease ; splendid opening for Dentistry ; 
price £650. Apply co " Antipyrin," 50 Southwark Street, London. No 
agents. 



YORKSHIRE.— Good Country Betall, with Wines and Spirits, rctnrn- 
irg £1,6C0 per annum, and capable of considerable increase ; nett 
profit C;U0 ; illness sole eauso of sala ; incoming about £1,000, or stock 
could be reduced if desired. F. J. Brett, Valuer, 60 St. Stephen's Road, 

Leioester. 



LONDON.- Old-rstablished Business ; average return? for 10 years 
ever £900, with plenty of scope for increase with personal attention ; 
£800 required ; a fair offer ; easy terms and trial can be arranged; good 
lease, stock, pi oprietaries, &o. Apply, "Cascara," Office of Thb 
Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 



■OOftjf^ —LIGHT EetailandDispcnsing: noheavy trade; situated 
<£j \J\f m in market place of small town; one other Chemist to 
unopposed district cf 8,000 ; established over 60 years : been neglected and 
latterly under manager; present returns £300, oould easily be trebled; 
good house, lease if desired. Elliott, Chemist, Bedford. 



SUSSEX —Retail, Dispensing, and Agricultural business ; handsomely 
fitted, mahogany ; good prices; verysaleab'e specialities attached ; 
large stock ; comfortable house ; average returns for past five years £709 ; 
cause of sale, going Into partnership ; overy Investigation offered ; price 
£650. " Bromo," Office of The Chsmist and Druosist, 42 Cannon 
Street, E.C. 



CHEMIST'S special prompt sale ; bargain — Thomas Tomlinson & Son, 
9 New Cannon Street, Manchester, have for disposal the old-estab- 
lished Business of the late Mr. William Greenhalgh, of Pcudlobury, near 
that city ; tho exeoutors must dear up the estate at once, so are willing 
to accept a disoount of 25 per oent. from valuation, about £2X), or about 
£150 n t ; returns at death near £600. 



jt~?f}f\f% — Light Retail, Prescribing and Dispensing Business in 
5<J *L \J \J m growing town old-established ; much neglected ; returns 
over £6, has done £10 lately; wants good business man with knowledge 
of country trade ; shop well fitted and stocked; good reasons for d's- 
pnml ; no reasonable offer refused; worth attention. "Ouemious,* 
Wright, Layman & Umnoy, 50 Southwarlc Street, S.H. 



"THOMAS TOMLINSON ft SON, Chemist's Agents and Valuers. 
1 Manchester, have for disposal a sterling Drug Business, with Li^ht 
profitable Grociries, and doing above £1,500 a year, In a suburban and 
ruaimfncMiring village whera thero is no other chemist, which they can 
confidently reeamincud ; amount about £800, but present owner, being 
from special reasons anxious to soil at onoe, would let part of amount 
remain for a term. 



£1 



April 11, 1891. THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. 



SITUATIONS OPEN-Continued, 

n/| ANAGER wanted (Indoors) ; quallded ; aged about 28 : must bo a 
111 thoroughly competent business man, of good general oxpcrleno\ 
and be able to produce substantial testimonials -, a Junior kept. Apply, 
stating usual particulars, to Geo. D tniel, 630 Holloway Road, N. 

ASSISTANT, at once, accustomed to good-ola«s Retail and Dispensing ; 
honrs 8 to 9, two nights off at 7 weekly, 1 hour each morning, half- 
a-day monthly, alternate Sundays: salary £10. Apply personally, or 
photo (to bo returned), stating full particulars, F. H. Glew, 156 Olapham 
Road, S.W. 

WANTED, Temporary Assistant, qualified, indoors : or with view to 
purchase; small Country business ; duties almost nil; would suit 
oie requiring change and rest : state salary, whloh must bo very low : o.d.v. 
if possible. Apply, A. B. C, OQloe of Chemist and Diiuooist, 42 Cannon 
Street, E.C. 



AN active Assistant, about 23, for a good-olass Retail and Dispensing 
business in London suburb, by Anril IB ; abstainer and member of 
Christian Churoh preferred: comfortable home; full particulars, photo, 
and salary required. J. H. H., Messrs. Edwards 4 Son, 157 Queen Yiotoria 
Street, E.G. 

ASSISTANT : thoroughly competent Dispenser end Counterman ; 
good-class Country trade; abstainer and member o.' Christian 
Church. State full particulars, salary required, and aee (photograph 
if possible). J. W., Messrs. Evans, Loscher St Webb, 60 Bartholomew Close, 
LondoD,E.C. 

AN experienced qualified Assistant for high-class Dispensing and Retail 
business: indoors; 2 kept; liberal salary to suitable man. Address, 
with full particnlars of experience, with age, height, salary required, and 
enclose photo, to Charles White, Fharm. Chemist, Buckingham Palace 
Road, London, S.W. 

- 

QUALIFIED Junior, for Light Retail and Dispensing; chance of 
learning operative and mechanical Dentistry ; reference mu9t bear 
investigation ; one halt - day from 2 aid one evening from 7 per 
week off ; applicants must take an interest in shop and proprietaries. 
Usual particulars and photo to "Chemist and Dentiit," 70 Oxton Riad, 
Birkenhead. 

AS Senior and Managing Assistant, qualided, indoors, in a high-class 
West end business ; a thoroughly responsible, energetio man, of 
good address and mature experience ; also a gentleman about 25, and 
qualified, as Second Assistant ; references must bear striotest investigation. 
Anply, by letter. with full particulars, carte, and state salary required, to 
"Proprietor," Horner & Sons, Mitre Squire, Aldgate, B.C. 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 

1*. for twelve words ; 6d. for every six words beyond. 
JUNIOR (20); in good business; satisfactory reference. Field, Post 



Office, Ossett. 



A 



SSISTANT ; gcod London experience; London preferred. Owen, 19 
Grange Rood, Camden Town. 



V SSISTANT : outdoors; London; excellent references; qualified. 
23 Falmouth Road, Borough, S.7. 

OCUMTENENS. Mnna7er, cr Dispenser; qualified ; disengaged. 

• '•Extractor,'' 92 Howsnn Road, Brockley. 

OCUM-TENENS or Manage^! qualified; nged 37; abstainer. 

• I. J. E., 3 Woburn ?Uc«, Russell Square, W.0. 



QUALIFIED Assi.tant! outdoors! tall: a.*ed 26) 12 jearB 1 good 
exp2rience. J. D., 2 M?Jgund Terrace, Edinburgh. 

AS Assistant, In or near London '; short hours or time for s'.udy ; aged 
21. A. B„ 3 Wyndhom Street, Bryanston Square, \Y\ 

ASSISTANT or Manaaer; aged 29 i experienced. " Extractor," 
Office of The Chemist and Dnoooisr, 42 Cannon Street, 2,0. 

mANAQER for Branch, or Temporary ; qualified 5 highest refer- 
ences ; many years' experience. R., 41 Rigault Roid, Fulham.S.W, 



AS Junior; accustomed to flrst-clau dispensing: 5 years' experience ; 
good references. S, Uook, Monmonth Street, llridgwater, Somerset. 

QUALIFED Assistant; aged 23; 61 years' experience; good refer- 
ences. " Alpha," Office of The Chemist and Dhuooist, 42 Cannon 
Street E.O. 

IMPROVER ; 4 yean' experience In General, Retail, and Dispensing 
trade ; passed Preliminary ; aged 20 ; time for study. Kilmer, I'riddy, 
Wells, Somerset, 



J ONIOR (19) ; 4 years' oxperlonoa. II., 30 Boetwell Street, ChesteY 



AS Assistant (26) ; outdoors: full or part tlmo. Jonos, 3 Rochester 
l'laoo, Canidon Town, N.W. 

AS Dispenser (23) ; Bradford preferred ; qualified ; hoight 5 ft. 11 In. ; ^ 
stato salary, B.iyllff, Kirkby Lonsdulo. 

■ _ /: 

1UW ANAGER or Sonior ; 25 years' experience ; good bookkeeper, \ 
» I • '• Zemo," 21 Hampden Street, Nottingham. 

ASSISTANT or Junior ; aged 21 : 8J years' experience. Full particu- 
lars lo H. H„ 4a Montfort Road, Strood, Kent. 

AS JUNIOR ; 7 years' experience ; age 22 ; disengaged 21th (after 
exam.) W. Roberts, 3 Wyndham Street, Bryanston Square, W. 



|UJ ANAGER ; dispenser ; 23 : mnrricd ; permanency ; diseogaged 
ill shortly. By letter, " Chemist," 19 Gough Street, Birmingham. 

r*|ISPENSER and Bookkeeper to Surgeon or Assistant ; Wholesa'e or 
*-l Retail ; middle-aged ; qualified. A. L., 1 Harvey Road, Camberw.-il 
Green. 

JUNIOR (21); height 6 ft.; no objection to Wholesalo; Liverpool or 
Manchester distriot preferred. "Beta," Illsley, Chemist, Barnard 
Castle. 

ASSISTANT, aged 22; 5 ft. 8 in.; time for stuly; London, Liver- 
pool, or Manchester preferred. Marsh, 65 Boutport Streot, Birn- 

staple. 



TO Manage a Branch ; can Extract Teeth, &c. ; qualified ; mtrr 
good Prescriber ; aged 40. " Chemious," 14 Gerrard Street, A, 
Birmingham. 

AS Assistant in Wholesale house ; Wet or Dry counter ; experibv 
(4 years) in good country-town business. Palmer, Priddy Vioarajj 
Wells, Somerset. 

EVENING Employment by student at Woodlands ; good exp3ri 
ami references; disengaged April 21. Franks, care of He 
Chemist, Southsea. I 

AS Junior Assistant ; just out of time ; passed Prelim. ; aged 13 
experience in dispensing and retail trade. Apply, S. Kitley, F. 
Buildings, Bath. 

BRANCH Manager, or outdoor Assistant ; good all-round experiem 
not r. gistered (35) ; single ; 5 ft. 8£ inches ; abstainer. "Hydrarg 
The Pharmacy, Whitstable. 

IMPROVER, quick and industrious, desirous re-engagement; indoors 
or otherwise ; experienced in making pills and powders, &c. " Alpha," 
60 Mervan Road, Brixton, S.W. 

REQUIRED, a position of trust by gentleman; rmny years' office 
experience in the Drug and Chemi cal trades ; undeniable ret t 
ences. II. E. C, 33 Marlborough Road, S.E. 



A YOUNG man, thoroughly experienced in the manufacture 
Pharmaceutical Preparations and Perfumery, wishes for a Lon< 
engagement. J. M., 168 Sutherland Avenue, \y. 



\/"OUNG German, speaking English, seeks situation in the office 
I Wholosale Drug house by August 1 or September ; best testimonU 
Add re; s, Z. 773, care of Haasenstein <& Togler, A.-'i., Leipzig. 

ASSISTANT or Manager ; Lancashire preferred ; over 12 yeai 
varied experience; married; good addrc°s, Prescriber. Dispense 
and references ; 5 ft. 10J in. Address, Mountcaitle, La Motte, S:. Hclier.j 

CHEMIST'S SON, Minor student, requires board and lodging i| 
return for part-time services; near Wills' preferred; agod 22). 
height 5 ft. 11 in. Apply, A. Taylor, Jun., Eccleshill, near Bradford' 

Tories. 



COMMERCIAL Traveller (40), having good connection, in Lad > 
coslitre, fetiutu and West of England, also Ireland, wants to represent 
a good Druj house: highest references. T. M., Office of Tus CHEMIST 
and DiiiAiuiST, 42 Cannon Street, E,','. 

AS Assistant to Mcdioal Man, or Manage for Chemist; aged 40; 
married : no family ; visit i Dispenser I good Aoooucheur ; 2> years' 
rxperiencei flrst-olass references and testimonials. Address ' Delta," 
Office of The Chemist and Dkuooirt, 42 Cannon Streot, E.G. 

mANUFACTURING ChomUts and Druggists.— Wanted, by Agent, 
calling on Wholcstld Druggists and Chemists in Belfast, London- 
derry, and leading towns in North of Ireland, Agencies for grods of all 
o'OBSOS to offer to same ; satisfactory references. Address, " Spccialitie," 
Olllcu of 1'hk Chkmist and DBC0O1ST, 42 Cannon Street, B.C. 

TRAVELLER, with good and safe connection successfully worked, for 
1 2U years In South Walts, &c , will shortly be disengaged, and open 
to rc-cngagemcnt on commission or othorwiso ; ami influence trade for 
respcctablo house ; thoroughly acquainted with all brauclics of the trade, 
who'.csalo and retail. Roferciiccs and full particulars, "Druggist" 
7 Oriuhtou Street, Cardiff. 

65 



THE CHEMIST AND DKUGG1ST SUPPLEMENT. April 11, 1891. 



A N Assistant, early in May, in a Mixed oountry business ; not under 21 ; 
r\ iudoors, and of Christian chnraster. Address, with full partlcul irs, 
7iE30ulaplua,"Bvans, Sons & Co., Liverpool. 

DURY.— Improver, or Junior Assistant, wanted at once, for a Mixed 
D Druf? business; must bo a good counterman; state tortn>, ifco. 
Heywood & do., Cliemists, Priucoss Streot, Bury. 


AAf ANTED, a Foreign Assistant, speaking French and German. Apply, 
VV J. Adams, 49 Oxford Street, Southampton. 


IMMEDIATELY, for good-class Dispensing business, qualified 
I Assistant; ind ors. Parkes, 195 Belsiza Road, Kilburn. 


\PJ ANTED, n Junior Assistant (outdoors). Apply, giving foil par- 
VV tici.lars, to D. P. Roberts, Drug and Chemical Store, North Ead, 

Croydon. 


\A/ ANTED, an Assistant, active and trustworthy. Apply, with full 
VV particulars of age, experience, salary required, and references, to 
K. Dajkip, Church Street, Ripley, Derbyshire. 


A T ONCE, good Counterman, indoors, for brisk cash business. Apply, 
r% stating experience, &a, to J. XL. Lewis, 22 and 24 Great Portland 

Street, W. 

fVUTDOOR Second Counterman; good-class Store trade. Apply, 
\J* with leferenoes, n3e, height, salary, and c.d.v , Wand, Haymarkct, 

Leicester. 


IUNIOR Assistant (indoors), accustomed to Light Retail and Dis- 
O peusing. Address, stating ago, salary required, previous experience, 
and references, to " Chemist," 67 Walton Street, Oxford. 

\Af ANTED, a qualified Assistant, immediately, accustomed to a first- 
W class Business : send foil particulars (a personal intorview pre- 
ferred). John Baily, Pharmacist, 5 Pond Street, Hampstoad, N.W. 


nil INO 1 ; indoors ; to manage Branch ; 1} hour's Dispensing at local 
1*1 hospital; £50 and commission; good references; photo. Phillips 

& Worts, Ealing, W. 


\A[ ANTED, at once, an Assistant, acoastomed to a good-class Dis- 
VV pensing business; state age, height, and salary; send phot'), if 
possible, with reference. G. S. Ball, 1 Albert Terrace, Weston-super- 
Mare. 


AAf ANTED, qualified Manager, middle-aged, to live indoors, for gcod 
VV Country trade, owing to reoent death of proprietor. Apply 0., care 

of Vyleys & Co., Covtntry. 

I MMEDIATELY, a Junior Assistant and an Improver. Apply, 
1 stat:ng age, height, experience, and enclose photo (t a be returned if 
cot engaged), to J. Johns & Son, Southampton. 


ASSISTANT wanted; Senior; qualified; must be a quick and 
x\ accurate dispenser and good counterman ; state age, height, refer- 
ence, and enolose oarte. Milton & Son, Pharmaceutists, 216 High Street, 
Exeter. 


AAf ANTED Assistant, for good-class Dispensing business ; two ap- 
VV prentices kept ; hours easy ; if with ki owledge of Dentistry prefer- 
able, but not necessary. Send full particulars to F. W. Doujleday, 
Dorking. 

ASSISTANT wanted; iudoors; must be thoroughly well up in dis- 
m\ peniiiiEr, and accustomed to a goad-class business. Apply, with 
usual particulars and references, eaclosing oarte, to S. Rogers, Osborne 
.33oad, Southsea. 

AAf ANTED, a good Junior Assistant ; indoors; accustomed to good- 
V V class Retail and Dispensing business ; state age, height, references, 
•alary required, and enclose, it possible, carte do visite. E. H. Croydon, 
Chemist, Newcastle, Staffs. 


IUNIOR or Improver for Retail and Dispensing businesi; good 
V Counterman, obliging and active. State age, height, and salary 
required, J. Buttcrwoitu, 21 Walworth Road, S.E. 


A T ONCE, qualified Assistant, about 23, to manage Small Branch ; also 
m\ Junior, about 19. State full par iculnrs and salary required, G. H. 
Brunt (late Lear), 337 Coventry Road, Birmingham. 


J3ART-TIME Assistant ; board and lodging in return for service; ; 
* £ood references required; competent and reliable; olOJe to two 
schools. Bunker, 135 Great Dover Street, Boro", S.E. 


LB EREFORD General Infirmary — Wanted, qualified Dispenser ; salary 
• a £! 0 a year ; board and wa-hiog ; preference given to one possessing 
a knowledge of Minor Surgery. Apply, House Surgeon. 


\*/ANTED, qualified Assistant, to manage a Branch near London; 
VV most be able to extract teeth and preicribe. State salary required, 
and give full particulars of experience, to " Pnarmacist, ' 1 Wroughtou 
Road, Nightingale Lane, S.W. 


A COMPETENT Assistant (indoors), about 24 ; must be well up in 
/"» Dispensing and accustomed to a good-class business. Apply, stating 
age, height, salary, and references, to J. Munday, Chemist, 1 High Street, 
Cardiff. 


A COMPETENT Assistant (Minor), for first-class Dispensing and 
f\ Retail business; must be a quick and reliable dispenser. State full 
particulars of experience, with age, height, salary required, and enclose 
photo, to W. Price, Chemist, Eastbourne. 

A SSISTANT wanted, in Light Retail and Dispensing business; a 
m\ i oung man of some experience, decidedly steady, with good moral 
character, or a married man, if at moderate salary ; work light. Apply, 
" Delta," care of Jackson & Co., Octagon, Plymouth. 

^17ESTGATEONSEA.— Immediately, a competent qualified As- 
VV sistant, of good address, for a first-class Dispensing Business ; must 
be gentlemanly, obliging* and trustworthy. Apply, with height, carte, 
and references, to F. K. Bessant, Pharmaceutical Ohtmiit. 


"pR AVELLER wauted, on good commission, to sell to Chemists very 
I salenb'e article; applications confidentially treated. Apply by 

letter, 100/20, Ofiloe of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon 
Street, EC. 


AAf ANTED, an indoor Assistant, aocustomed to good-olass trade. 

W state age, height, salary required, when disengaged, how long in 
last situation, also enclose carte (wliioh will be returned), Morgan, Chemise. 
Southend-on-Sea. 


I MMEDIATELY, Junior Assistant, active and obliging; no Sunday 
1 duty, comfortable home. Particulars of previous experience, age, 
height, salary required, <fco., and carte,' to Smart, Pharmaceutical Chemist, 
Steyuing, Sussex. 


•Ul/ANTED, at once, qnalifiel Assistant; one accustomed to quick 
VV business ; abstainer preferred ; a permlnenay to a steady but 
active man ; most be able to take sole charge of Dispensing, sale of 
poiion?, &o. ; preference given to a young man. Ince, D udley, Worcs. 

^^UALTFIED Assistant (outdoors), to take nearly entire charge of a 
V«i business in a main thoroughfare of the north east of London ; a 
gentleman desiring to retain a permanency preferred ; no Sunday duty. 
Apply personally, if possible, to Christopher Wheeler, 143 Hackney Road. 


ASSISTANT; nged about 2 1 ; Minor qualification; must be reliablj 
*"a\ Dispenser, write a good hand, and have had experience in the best 
class of trade. Apply, with full particulars, and enclosing carte, to Edward 

Peaison, Nottingham. 


AAf ANTED, competent, trustworthy Assistant for oentral Branch ; 
VV outdoors. Apply, stating nge, height, experience, salary required, 
enclosing photo (without which applications not entertained), D. W. 

Bnrdill, Lhcmist, Derby. 


AAf ANTED, about May 1st, an Assistant, with good provincial ex- 
VV perience ; must be a neat and accur.it; dispenser, and well up in 
tne business ; first-class references iadispcasab'e. State age, height, salary, 
'and enclose oarte, to Chave & Jackson, Pharmaceutical Chemists, 
Hereford. 


I MMEDIATELY.— A reliable Assistant, with good all-round ex- 
1 perienc?, for a select London business. Apply, by letter, stating age, 
height, salary (outdoors), and references, 163/6, Office of The Ohbmist 

and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 


1 IMMEDIATELY.— Smart Junior (Indoors) in gond-class Dispensing 
1 business ; state age, height, salary required, with full particulars and 
photo (to be returned). A'so an Approntico fpassoi Preliminary) ; 
exceptional facilities for learning the trade. App'y, W. Rowi>, 82 Grauby 
Street, Leioaster. 


AN Assistant, about £2, by tho early part of May; Light Retail 
Jrk and Dispensing ; West ; must bo energetic, competent, and trust- 
woithy. Write, appointing interview, or enclose photo, with particulars, 
" Chemist," 2 Fernhtad Road, St. Peter's Park. 


n ONDON.— Good Junior wanted for Dispensing and General Retail ; 
La pushing Counterman ; required to sleep in and board himself for 
limited time. State terms and experience, to '" Hamlin," Office of Tub 
Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Streot, E.G. 


IMMEDIATELY, an energetic Assistant, with good cxporioace, for 
1 brisk Retail ; age! about 2 5 ; indoors ; Suuday evening duty and lato 
hours, in consideration of which a whole day's holiday given weekly. 
State salary, full particulars, and enolose pho'.o, to " Rex," care of Ismavs, 
Newcastle- upon-Ty no. 


/"VHEMISTO.— Wanted, an experienced Chomist, with a knowlodgo ol 
drugs preferred ; will bo required to work in laboratory and assist 
in manspcnicut of manufacturing business. Apply by letter to "Chemist," 
care of Mitchell & Co., 12 Red Lioii Court, Fleet Street, E.G. 


1 ABORATORY.-Old-establiehcd film of Loudon Dru?gists have a 
la vacancy for a young Chemist who has had a good scientific educa- 
tion, followed by a fow years' experience of the manufacture of extracts, 
small chemlca's, and other P.B. preparations, as well as of the purification 
or li'avy chemicals, 4io. ; liberal terms to a snttable applicant. Address, 
stating age, experience, and salary required, 11., Lyuwoud Villa, Bcteuus- 
Ucld Bond, NuwSoutbgute. 


I Ui> IOR Assistant (irdoors) ; must have satisfactory references ; one 
U accustomed to a good-class Retail and Dispensing business. Apply, 
„tat ! ng age, height, cxpericr.es, references, nnd salary required, call or 
grud photo, to " Chemist," 31? Fulhaiu Road, Broinpton, S.W. 



01 



April 11, 1891. THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. 



BUSINESSES IOR DISPOSAL— Continued. 

COR SALE, old-established Rotail ; light trade; small stook; exoel- 
a lent opportunity. " Veto," 7 Com Exobange, Sheffield. 


TO LET. 


3s. 6d. for fifty words ; 6d. for every 10 words beyond. 


| ANC ASHIRE.— Having accepted an appointment, will soli nloo small 
l_ Light Rotail Business for valuo of stock or Sxturos, or, if desired, 
fixtures only : now doing about £7 per week, stoadily increasing ; easy 
terms are offered ; splendid opportunity for Assistant with small oapltal. 
Address, "Chemist," 60 Church Street, Proston. 


"TTO Chemists and Drugpists.— Shop to Lot, In lending thoroughfare, with 
I fixtures and pnrt stock ; business of sovornl years' standing; can 
bo entered upon at onoo by arrangement. Apply, M. Wilkin, 248 Freeman 
Street, Grimsby. 


(PROFITABLE BUSINESS : Dispensing and Retail ; doing between 
* £7 aud £3 weekly ; immediate possession ; neatly fitted ; good 
neighbourhood ; opening for Dentistry ; half an hour from City ; very 
favourable terms to cash purchaser. Address, "Genuine," Office of Thb 
Chemist and Dkugqist, 42 Gannon Street, B.O. 


TO LET— Shop wlih Wino nnd Spirit Lieonoe ; fixtures suitable for a 
1 Chemist's Business ; Inrgo shop, thickly populated ueifchbourhood, 
and would have no opposition; nsplondid opening; rent low. Applr, 
oare of the Licbig Medicaid Wino Co ,25 Lumb Lane, Bradford. 


"■pUNBRIDGE WELLS. — Excellent business premises ; grand 
■ thoroughf.ro ; two shops with house combined ; 30 years in occupa- 
tion of chemist, but suitable for gr jeer or any other business ; moderate 
rent ; haso ; small ingoing at valuation. B. Pomfret, Vainer, Tunbrldge 
Well". 


DARE opportunity for Registered Chemist.— For Sale by Tender, 
Mm Drug Store Business, situated in prinoipal thoroughfare of 
cathedral oity ; good opening for reaently qualified Chemist. For parti- 
culars and leave to view apply to Mr. Wm. Wetherill, St. Wilfrid's 
Terrace, Ripon ; or Messrs. Bdmundson & Gowland, Solicitors, Ripou and 
Masham, 


MEDICAL 1 o places for Sale ; lowest price £550 each; would 
111 suit Surgeon, Chemist, or Botanio Druggist. 1st, a 6-roomcd 
house, with plate-glass front, surgery fittings, garden and out-ofllces: used 
9 years as a " Provident Dispensary." 2nd, to end of lease, rent 60f. ; in 
hands of present Surgeon, 35 years ; over this is " The Holl of Science and 
Anatomy," from which alone a fortune may be made by fresh energy. 
Apply Dr. S., 28 Queen's Road, Brighton. 


BUSINESSES WAITED. 

3s. 6d. for fifty words; Qd. for every 10 words beyond. 


11/ ANTED, a genuine Retail, Dispensing, and Prescribing Business in 
VY Loudon: main road preferred, with pl-.-nty of scope for increase; 
cash atont £600. Send full particulars, in confidence, to L. Hughos, 
53 Arbour Square, Stepney. 


FOR SALE. 


3s. 6d. for fifty words ; 6d. for every 10 words beyond. 


IN good neighbourhood, within about 60 miles of London, good Retail 
1 and Dispensing Business, returning between £1,100 and £1,5C0 ; 
Partnership in large concern entertained, with view to ultimate succession ; 
musi bear strictest investigation. FuU particulars to O. P., 36 High 
Street, Guildford. 


POR SALE.— Nearly new Mineral-water Michine.by Bratby &Hinoh- 
I™ liffe; Gasometer; Generator; 4 enamelled Syrup Pans; about a 
thousand dozen Bottles, full fize and splits ; quantity of cases, med two 
seasons ; death cause of disposal ; bargains ; horse, vao, and harness, if 
desired. O. Thurston (late Roper), Newent, Gloucestershire. 


ll/ANTED, genuine Light Retail, Dispensing, and Prescribing Busi- 
W ness in the suburbs of London or country town ; returns from 
£600 to £1,030 ; wonld not object to a neglected business capable of being 
worked np ; cash ready ; referenoes given. " Bbor," Office of The 
Chemist and Dhuggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 


COR SALE— One mahogany bent- gla=s toothbrnsh-oaie, 23 \ ; one4-ft. 
■ " 6-in. mahogany- wall- case, second-hand, 6'. ; 180 gold-labelled rounds 
and jars, 8/. 5s. ; 34 3 lb. blue jars, labelled, 2s. each ; one 12 ft. range new 
mahogany drawers, with glass labels and knobs, 9/. ; one 9-ft. second hand 
counter, panelled front, 40s. ; one 6- ft. ditto, 30i. ; one 8 ft. ditto, mahogany 
top, 50*. ; one 6-ft. mirror-centre dispensing-screen, 6/. 10s. ; one ditto, 
new, 6f. :'four 3- gall second-hand corboys with cut stoppers, 9s. each ; four 
4-gall. ditto, 12s. fkl. each ; three 6-gall. ditto, 15s. 6t). each ; two 8-gnll. 
ditto, 22s. 6d. eaoh. Richard Tomlinson & Son, medical fitters, Bond 
Street, Birmingham. 


PARTNERSHIPS. 


3s. Gd.for fifty words; 6d. for every 10 words beyond. 


SITUATIONS OPEN. 


11/ ANTED, Gentleman, with moderate capital, as Partner in 
VV Chemist's business, a few miles from London, to enable proprietor 
to attend to dental cases. Address, " Chemicus," Office of The Chemist 

ivn TlRT'flflTfiT dp flnnnnn firrppt. It! C 1 , 


3s 6<#. for fifty words ; 6d. for every 10 words beyond. 


A MANUFACTURING Chemist, with an established lucrative 
t\ Business, requires a gentleman Partner, with a taste for Travelling, 
able to invest £100 and assist in extending the busineis. Address, " Manu- 
facturer," Ofiice of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.O. 


1JS7ANTED, Outdoor Assistant; qualified; not under 25; General 
W business, Yorkshire. Apply, F., care of Evans, Sons & Co., Liver- 
pool. \ 


(PARTNERSHIP.— Chemist, in excellent old-established business, of 
m which he has been proprietor for nearly 30 years, is desirous, on 
account of falling health, of meeting with an energetic young man with a 
capital of £200 with view to succeision. Apply, P., Office of The Chemist 
and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, B.C. 


1 A /ANTED, qualified Junior Assistant for a good Retail and Dispensing 
W business.— Apply to W. 0< Jones & Co., 23 Bayswater Torraoe, Lon- 
don, W. 


A SSISTANT, qualified (indoors), wanted for Mixed business. ipply, 
x\ stating salary, with references and photo, Coleman, Chemist, Wolver- 
hampton. 

1 X 1 ANTE O, a steady, reliable Assistant, with Minor qualification ; not 
XI V under 23 years of age. Address, H. S. Iekc, 37 Vestry Road, Oam- 
bcrwe'.l, S.E. 

A N Assistant (qunlifled preferred), acoustomed to Dispensing; good 
A salary to a suitable man, State full particulars to M. N., 42 Cannon 
Street, London. 


1/ ALU ABLE OPENING— Active Partner, qualified, prepared to 
w Invest for extension at least ££00 in a successful Retail and Whole- 
sale Business in Manohester ; two new and valuable medicinal Bpeoialltles 
of mnch value, largely sold ; only bon& Jide applications, stating references, 
will be entertained. Apply to the International Drug Company (Limited), 
159 Stretford Road, Manchester. 


TENDER. 


I UNIOR Assistaut (indoors), nccustomod to good-olass busliuss ; state 
\J ago, height, salary required, and give referenoes. J. Williams, 140 
Viotoria Roa4, Aldershot. 


BOKOTJGH OF PORTSMOUTH. 

"THE URBAN SANITARY AUTHORITY invito Tenders for the 
I supply of Disinfectants. Particulars, forms of tender, and con- 
ditions to bo obtained at the Town Hall, Portsmouth, and Tenders, 
endorsed "Tender for Disinfectants, ' aro to be delivered at the Town 
Hall not later than 6 p.m. on Tuesday, the 21st day of April, 1891. 

ALEXANDER HELLARD, Town Olerk. 

Dated 4th April, 1891. 


USflANAGER for 8 first-class Retail and Dispensing establishment in 
■VI Dublin Apply to A. R. O, care of liarron, Harveys & Oo^ 
Giltspur Stree', London. 


A SSISTANT, about 21 or 22, acoustomed to Dispensing. State age, 
i\ height, experience, nnd lalary required, enclosing photo, toG. Briggs, 
221 Woodliouso Lano, Leeds. 


APPRENTICESHIP. 


/"> OOD Junior ; must bo quick and accurate dlspouser ; three assistants 
Kj kept. State ago, height, salary required, and encloso poto, to Johns 


A PPRENTICE wanted by firm of Druggists, whore there aro two 
t\ Bhops; a good Christian homo Is offerod to suitable yout^i, where 
a thorough knowlcdgo can be acquired; studies superintended: small 
premium. 19/18, Office of Ta* Oheausx anu DbUUUist, 42 Caution 
l(|tr««t, E.O, 


ID/ ANTED, at once, Junior for seaside business ; not under 21 ; com- 
WV potent to tukc charge; (rood references indispensable. Apply, with 
full partleu'urs, to C. Matthews & Co., RoBWll Street, Mlddlesbro -on-reei. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. 



Apkil 11, 1891. 



SITUATION S WANTED— Continued, 

TEMPORARY Manager ; 10 years' unexceptionable reforenoes ; 
London in May; part or whole day. " CliemUt," 11 Raduor Plaoe, 
Plymouth. '• ' 

AS General Assistant ; unqualified ; good references ; moderate salary ; 
total abstainer; medium age. "Ziugib3tiu," 1 Pickering Street, 
Holme, Manchester. 

Scotchman ; aged 26 ; first-class 
'* Chemist," 



SENIOR or Manager : qualified ; Scotchman ; aged 
experience and references ; at liberty 23rd Inst. 
53 Edgware Road, W. ■ 



ASSISTANT ; Loudon ; aged 20 ; time for study ; good Dispenser ; 
highest references ; non-smoker ; abstainer. " Pepsalia," Tne 
Lilacs, Watlington, Oxon. 

ASSISTANT ; outdoors ; Prescribe, Extract ; 9 years' experience ; 
3 years' reference ; heights feet 9 inches. Terms, Ac, to " Tincture," 
2 Corporation Street, Barnsley. 



YOUNG Man requires situation as Junior Assistant: gool Counterman ; 
4 years' experience in good country trade (20) ; time for study. 
Palmer, Priddy, Wells, Somerset. 

DISPENSER, 14 years' hospital experience, seeks re engagement to 
Hospital or Doctor ; good references. G. Cunning, Kllenmore, 
Littledown Road, Bournemouth. 

AS Assistant in good London Dispensing house, with 3 hours a day 
for study ; small salary ; Minor qualification ; excellent references ; 
aged 30. " Dens," 8 Queen Street, Edgware Road. 

lUI ANAGER or Senior ; town or country ; married, one child ; aged 
111 40; quarter-century's experience; exoellent testimonial}; dis- 
engaged. " Rosmorin," 128 Fore Street, Edmonton, N. 

BRANCH Manager ; married ; thoroughly experienced ; good Pre- 
soriber and Tooth Extractor; highest references. '• Cheshire," 
Office of The Chemist and Druggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.C. 

COMMERCIAL Traveller, having good connection in Lancashire and 
Yorkshire wiih Chemists, &o., wants to represent good house ; tall, 
and of good address; references, <Jtc. Apply, M. J., 78 Albion Street, 
Leeds. 

TRAVELLER; open to engagement with Wholesale Drug Finn; 
ground covered, Southern Counties and Bristol to Oxford ; well 
known to buyers. " Taraxacum," Office of Tub Chemist and Dbuggist, 
42 Cannon Street, E.G. 

WANTED, by experienced medical gentleman, aged 30, qualified 
6 years, going to Upper India next October, plaoe as Manager or 
Pre.oriber ; understands Retail ; or would represent wholesale house on 
salary and commission. Address, " Physic," care of Mr. John Cooke, 
18 Markhouse Avenue, Walthamstow. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Special charges are made for Advertisements under this heading 
which can be obtained on application. 



SHARES for Sale ; 60 6 per cent. Preference, 60 Ordinary, in Barclay 
Si Sons, Limited. Offers requested to Bexhill Chronicle Office, Bex- 
hill, Sussex. 

EVERLASTING PERFUMES. 

PRICE LIST sent ou application; large discount for cash; un- 
doubtedly the most economical and non-deteriorating perfumes (or 
exportation. S. A. Freeman, Victoria Orove, Stoke Kewington, London, N. 

SPECIALITY/.] WAFERS [ BP J3 JIALIT Z. 

FOR Bakers and Druggists, from P. G. Bauriedel in Nuremberg 
(Germany), Flour Mills and largest Steam Factory of the finest and 
guaranteed purest, cheapest, and best Wafer Papers ; write for samples 
and prices. Agents wanted everywhere. 

PRELIMI NARY AND MINOR. 

TOLLY'S method of preparation is without equal ; send for particulars. 
Knotty Points in Latin Grammar, U. 6d. ; Ceesar Simplified, U. i 
Metric System Simplified, U. ; How to Write an Essay, 3d. ; Equations 
Simplified, li. ; Student's Herbarium, 100 specimens, 7i- 6</., post free. 
Mr. J. Tully (Hill's Prizeman), Chemist, Hastings. 

PRELIMINARY AND MINOR. 

STUDENTS ! If you wish to prepare for Examination easily and 
thoroughly, without leaving business or expendiug time and 
money on " correspondence systems " (?), write to Mr. Filtucss, Chemist, 
Crowboro' Cross, Tunbridgc Wells, for " How to Prepare for Exam.," gratis 
and post free. Success guaranteed. No Fee. 

STIRLING'S " MINOR AIDS." 

Organic Materia Medica. Concisely tabulated, thus saving much time and 
laborious reading. In stiff boards, cloth Kilt, poat free, Is. 7d. 

Kotee on Dispensing- 3rd Edition. Po*t free, Is. Id. - 

Botanical Companion : How to Describe a Plant, &c. Tost free. Id. 

Doses, Sp. Gravities, and Percentages or B.P. 188S and 1880. Vest- 
pocket edition. Post free, 6d. 

Sola by 11. Kimptoh, 82 High Holhorn. A 11 orders by post should be addressed 
to the Publisher— 

G0WER, 4 Lancing Road, Ealing, London (late of Hackney.) 

Middlesex College, 40 Charlotte St, Portland Place, W. 

(Established 1885) 

The next Course commences April 28tb. Fees till June Examination, 
£4 4s. ; till July Examination, £6 6j. 

The teaching is of the soundest and most practical character, and eooh 
student receives careful individual attoution. 

The Minor Evening Class meets as usual on Mondays and Thursdays, 
hours 7 to 10. Fees— Six months, £4 4j. ; Three months, £2 12*. 6d. 

N.B.— Special attention is invited to the Major Evening Class held on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays ; hours and Fees as for Minor. 

. F. HUBERT PAINTER, Principal. 



EXCHANGE COLUMN. 



See page 8. 



Limited to the Advertisement of Surplus Stock, Formutse, Addresses Wanted, and Articles Wanted. 



CO 
S3 



03 



-t-> <D 
« p, 

<t is 



o 



CJ 



o 

O QJ 

03 

-Q o 

o 



. Printed by Spottibwoods «V Co., Now-street Square ; and Published at the Offioe,42 Oaquon Street, in the City of London.— April 11,1891. 
63 



April 18, 1891. THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT, 



BUSINESSES TOR DISPOSAL— Continued. 



CHEMISTS and Druggists' Business, with Post Offloe attaohed, 
N W. district of London ; mach negleoted : takings £11 weekly ; 
populous neighbourhood. Apply, K., Messrs. Hodgklnson, Prestons & King, 
81 Blshopsgate Street Without. 



LANCASHIRE.— A thoroughly geoulne Retail and Prasoriblng Busi- 
ness, with plenty of scope for increase ; returns £530 ; net profits 
£2:0: price about £275; fullest investigation invited. "Alpha," care of 
Messrs. Woolley, Sons <fc Co., Market Street, Manchester. 



X* O 70 S.E.— Retail, Dispensing and Presoribing Business; under 
£m I \J a management ; well stocked ; returning £378 ; capable of 
great inorease ; rent £40 : good house, garden, back entrance ; will accept 
£270. Apply, " Alpha," 4 Douglas Street, New Gross, S.B. 

SOUTH COAST. — Dispensing, Presoribing, and Retail; Post Office 
attached ; also small Branch with Post Office ; price low to imme- 
diate purchaser ; rent and taxes low ; no tea,, tobacco, or stationery kept ; 
good openiDg for Dentistry. Address, " Statim," Mount Pleasant Pharmacy, 
Hasting*. 

LOND DN Suburb. — Light Retail and Dispensing Business in a rapidly 
increasing neighbourhood ; established 12 years ; returns £320 ; 
owner retiring on account of advanced age ; every investigation allowed ; 
price £?30. X. T., care of Messrs. Meggeson & Co., Miles Lane, Thames 
Street, London. 

IN the hest business town in the West Riding, an old-established Drug 
Business, at present under marager ; good opening for a business man. 
Nicely fitted shop, and well stocked ; to an immediate purchaser £260 ; 
rent £37; six rooms in house; good reasons for disposal. "Bromide," 
Bleasdale 4; Co., Druggists, York. 

HIGH-CLASS small Dispensing and Retail ; best market town ; same 
hands 30 years ; net profits over 60 per cent. ; rent and taxes £30 ; 
best position ; patents nil ; exceptional private house, garden, &c. ; a 
secure and easy living ; lowest price £650. " Shropshire, ' Offloe of The 
Chemist and Dhuggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.C. 

DEATH VACANCY, seaside, North of England.— To be sold, in 
consequence of the death of the proprietor, a first-class Retail, Pre- 
scribing, and Dispensing Business ; returns £1,000 per annum ; valuable 
Proprietaries; every investigation to purchaser; .references; moderate 
price. Apply, " Wilfrid," o/o Evans, Sons <St Co , Liverpool. 

MIDLANDS. — In consequence of ill-health, a Light Retail Business, 
returning £650 per annum, cash, and showing good profits; first- 
class position in small town; low rent ; numerous specialities for which 
there is an established sale ; excellent opening for Dentistry ; price £450. 
Address " Caryoph," care of Messrs. Wyleys & Co., Coventry. 



LANCASHIRE.— On sale, small Light Retail, Dispensing, and Pro- 
s' ribing Business; handsomely- fitted shop, in good position in main 
street ; convenient house attached ; steadily increasing trade ; easy terms 
are offered ; splendid opportunity fcr Assistant who has small capital, and 
is desirous of getting into Business. Address, ' Chemist," 50 Ohurch 
Street, Preston. 

LONDON, S.E.— Old established Prescribing, Betail, and own prepara- 
tions ; very profitable, and all ready money ; busy main road ; 
thickly populated neighbourhood ; large, well-fitted shop ; good house wioh 
private entrance ; long lease ; two-thirds of rent let off; returns, under 
assistant, £255, easily increased ; price £200, or good offer would be 
entettainod. H,, Office of Tub Chemist and DnuQQiST, 42 Cannon 
Street, B.C. 

BY PBIVATE TREA.TY. 

FIRST-CLASS Dispensing and Retail Busine;s in suburb of Liver- 
pool, doing a genuine and increasing business at good prioes ; good 
shop and house (lo.v rental), stock, and fixtures; returns £850 under 
manager ; every inveatiga ion allowed ; sole reason for disposal death of 
proprietor. For further particulars apply to Mr. J, P. McKenna, Solicitor, 
7 Cook Street, Liverpool. 

NOTTINGHAM (New Radford).— Messrs. Boidoe & Co. are in- 
structed to sell by Tender the o'.d-established corner Retail and 
Prescribing Business at 39 Deuman Street, New Radford; returns are £S 
weekly at good profits, with scope for increase ; good opening for den- 
tistry ; shop is well fitted and stooked; 8-roorned house; rent only £25. 
This is a good opportunity for anyone with small capital, Tenders may 
be made either by valuation or lump Bum, and received up to Saturday, 
2nd May. Full particulars and tender formi of Messrs. Berdoe & Co., 30 
Jewry Street, Aldgate, London, E.C. 

BRIXTON, S.W., 77 Atlantlo Road (Death Vacancy).— Messrs. 
Berdoe & Co. are Instructed to Sell by Tender the Lease, Goodwill, 
B^ook, and Fixtures of tho Light Retail, Dispensing and Prescribing 
Busluess, which has been unler management the last 18 months ; return- 
ing £8 to £9 weekly at good pro3t>, as scirosly any patents are sold ; shop 
it well situated in the main marketing thoroughfare; double fronted; 
hindsomjly fitted In mahogany; well stocked; nlno-roomcd house; sldo 
entrance ; moderate rentil, on lease. To an energetic man with small 
capital this olers a fine opening, as the pojition commands a trale of at 
least £800 a year. The reserve fixed is very low, and we recommend It as 
a desirable Investment. Tenders will be received up to Saturday, the 2nd 
May. Full particulars and tender forms of Me <n. Berdoe & Co., 30 
Jewry Street, Aldgate, 



I ONDON. -Genuine Light Retail, Dispensing, and Prescribing Dual. 

ness, in n populous and rapidly increasing neighbourhood - hai,d- 
somoly-fittod and well stoAod shop; large uad convenient house £60 
SoS' book8 thorough order; returns last four years, £319, £557, £721 ' 
£856; prioo £800. Addrois, " Opium," Messrs, Erans, Lisohor <fc Webb' 
Bartholomew Close. 



BUSINESSES WANTED. 



3s. Qd. for fifty words; 6d. for every 10 words beyond. 



B 



USINESS wanted doing £700 to ££00 or more, or one that could be 
increased ; reply. Crown Farm, Stagsden, Bedford. 



WANTED, genuine Retail, Dispensing, and Prescribing Busicess ; 
returns about £600, with scope forincrease. Sen! full particular-! 
to " Barracks," Ossett, Yorkshire. 

WANTED, First-class Dispensing and Retail Business, showing from 
£600 to £800 net profit ; cash ready. Apply, X. Y. /,., Office of 
The Chemist and Dbugcist, 42 Cannon Street, E.C. 



WANTED, to purchase, for cash, a genuine Provincial Dispensing. 
Retail, and Prescribing Drug Busineis, making not less than £400 
yearly net profit; all replies considered confidential. Write "Chemicus," 
3 St. James's Villas, Lower Clapton, London, N.E. 



ADVERTISER is desirous of purchasing a good genuine Retail and 
Dispensing Business in or near a good provincial town, and not 
more than 100 miles from London, returning from £700 to £1,000. A 
Partnership in a larger concern would be entertained, if with a prospect 
of ultimate succession. Send full particulars in confidence to " Minor," 
c/o Mr. Bishop, 80 Aub ert Park, Highbury, London, N. 



PARTNERSHIP. 



3s. Qd.for fifty words; 6d. for every 10 words beyond. 

A MANUFACTURING Chemist, with an established luorative 
Business, requires a gentleman with a taste for Travelling, able to 
invest £100 and assist in extending the business. AddresB, " Manufacturer," 
Office of The Chemist akd Dbuggist, 42 Cannon Street, E.G. 



TO LET. 



3s. Gd.for fifty words ; 6d. for every 10 words beyotid. 



TO be Let, in a thriving town in North Wale3, with immediate 
possession, a commodious House and Shop, now occupied by a 
Chemist ; an exceptionally good situation and a splendid opening for nu 
energetic man. Address, T. Jones, 145 High Street, Bangor. 



TUNBRIDGE WELLS. — Exoellent business premis3s ; grand 
thoroughfare ; two shops with house combined ; 30 years in occupa- 
tion of Chemist, but suitable for grjoer or any other basines; ; moderate 
rent ; lease ; small ingoing at valuation. B. Pomtret, Valuer, Tunbridge 
Wells. ■ 

CAPITAL Shops to be let, In an important molern blook of buildings 
at the corner of two main thoroughfares, opposite Walham Green 
Churoh- good opening for Dispensary, Bootmaker's, Butoher's, or any 
retail business, Apply to John Jackson Wlioeler, Auctioneer, 5 Sloane 
Square, and 189 Fulham Road, S.W. 



APPRENTICESHIPS. 



3*. 6d. for fifty words ; Qd. for everu 10 words beyond. 

WANTED, to Apprentice (Indoors) a well e lucated Youth, who has 
passed the Preliminary, to a good class F.mily and Dispensing 
Chemist. Addreis, with full partlouluri and premium, to S., 40 Park 
Street, Wombwoll, Bamsley. 



TO Parents and Guardlans.-Thonus Sellorr. Chemist. Coventry, has a 
vacancy for a respectable and well educated youth as Apprentice : 
Indoors; comfortable home; good opportunity for learning general 
routine of the business, with good Dispensing experience ; must have 
passed Preliminary ; premium required ; Churchman preferred. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST SUPPLEMENT. Ai-ril 18, 1891. 



MTQP1TTT AlOinUS 


CHARES for Sale ; 50 6 per cent. Preference, 50 Ordinary, in Barclay 
O Si Sons, Limited. Offers requested to ISe.rhill Chronicle Office, Bex- 
hill, Sussex. 


Special charges are made for Advertisemsnts under this heading 
which can be obtained on application. 


PRELIMINARY A Tin MTHTflP 

"¥"ULLY'S method of preparation is without equal ; send for particulars. 
I Knotty Points In Latin Grammar, 1*. 6d. ; Caesar Simplified, 1*. ; 
Metrlo System Simplified, 1*\ ; How to Write an Essay, 3d. j Equations 
Simplified, 1*.; Student's Herbarium, 100 specimens, 7i. 6<f., post free. 

Mr. J. Tully (Hill's Prizeman), Chemist, Hastings. 


T™0 STUDENTS— Thorough and rapid preparation for the Pharma- 
1 ceutioal and Medical Prelims. ; very moderate terms ; board (if 
desired). " Virgil," 52 Ivanhoe Road, Denmark Park, S.B. 


PRELIMINARY AND MINOB. 

OTUDENTS! If you wish to prepare for Examination easily and 
O thoroughly, withont leaving business or expending time and 
money on " correspondence systems " (?), write to Mr. Filtness, Chemist, 
Crowboro' Cross, Tunbridgc Wells, for " How to Prepare for Exam.," gratis 
and post free. Sucoess guaranteed. No Fee. 


OLIVE OIL, SALAD, and other ITALIAN PRODUCTS. 

IUIE3SRS J. FAU & CO., Leghorn (Italy), desire to engage Agents 
III for the above in Loudon, Bristol, Edinburgh, and other towns of 
Great Britain ; offers, with references, requested. 


ROUSE'S STANDARD CARMINE 

One ounce Tins, 1/8; post free for P.O., or through any Wholfsalt House. 
TMPRflVFTi ANT) ORIflTrJAT FORMIIT JF flTVFN 

with each tin for the preparation of Face Powders, Bloom of Rones, 
Liquid Cochineal (labels for these supplied gratis), and practical sugges- 
tions and formula: for its economical use in Tooth Pastes, Tooth Powders, 
Rose-leaf Powder, <Sto. 

ROUSE & CO., WIGMORE STREET, LONDON, W. 


A FIRST-CLASS and well-known 
M MOSCOW AGENCY 

wishes to represent in Russia wholesale firms or manufacturers of Drugs 
and Chemicals. Apply to J. Hirschfeld, Mosoow. 


f> ENTLEMAN, with good all-rouud experience, but engaged during 
VJI the last few years in high-class work only, of active business habits 
and successful management, desires to meet with genuine investment for 
about £4E0 ; partnership, purchase, or arrangement ; first-class references ; 
preliminaries in strictest confidence. " Vigour," 88 Princess Road, Edg- 
baeton, Birmingham. 

" A VALUABLE AGENCY III" 

(Vide "VETERINARY COUNTER PRACTICE.") 

KI D —IT is particularly requested that all Chemists desirous of 
I » ■ D ■ availing themselves of the offer made under the above 
heading on page xiv in this new publication will Immetliately communicate 
with the advertisers with a view to having their names included in new 
lists of agents, - 


Middlesex College, 40 Charlotte St., Portland Place, W. 

(Established 158S) 

The next Course commen:ei April 28th. Fees till June Examatlon,in 
£4 4j. ; till July Examination, £6 6>. 

The teaching is of the soundest and most practical character, and each 
student reoelves careful Individual attention. 

The Minor Evening Clan meets as usual on Mondays and Thursdays, 
hours 7 to 10. Fees— Six months, £4 4j. ; Three months, £2 12». 6d. 

N.B. — Special attention Is Invited to the Major Evening Class held on 
Tuesdavs and Thursdays ; hours and Fees as for Minor. 

F. HUBERT PAINTER, Principal, 



Phis Supplement will be given free to any Chemist and Druggist or Assistant who will call for 
It at 42 Cannon Street on Friday afternoon, or will be posted on Fridays to any one who sends 

an addressed postal wrapper. 



EXCHANGE COLUMN. 



See page 16 

(bottom folio). 



Limited to the Advertisement of Surplus Stock, Formulae, Addresses Wanted, and Articles Wanted. 





1 


















— — ] 

















































— , 1 






















■ - 






































1 



-1-3 
03 



Q 
00 

l " 
CD 

< 5 



. M 
o 
o 



0 

• — I 
P, 

m 

o 
« 

> 

& 

0 
o 



a 

a 

o 
►*« 

09 
& 

t 



Printed by Si-onmwooiJic 4 oo., Now-at met Square j aud PUtfrishad at the Qffloe.42 Oannon Street, lu the City of London.-^"'" l'» 189 1 - 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



and history of the- Society, and we have illustrated our 
notice with authentic portraits of almost all its chosen 
chiefs during the half-century of its existence. We have 
endeavoured especially to pay the rightful tribute of respect 
to the one man (Jacob Bell) who, with such rare tact, patience 
and devotion, spent himself on behalf of his less fortunate 
brothers in the same vocation. 

William Allen, whose association with the Society at its 
foundation did so much to ensure its prestige, was an old 
man in 1841, and was then occupied with numerous philan- 
thropic enterprises, which could have left him little spare 
time. He retained the Presidency of the Pharmaceutical 
Sbciety till his death, two and a half years later, but it is 
evident that in that period the lion's share of the work was, 
undertaken by Mr. Bell ; while the Vice-President, Mr. Payne 
physically delicate but intellectually robust, contributed also 
valuable service. 

Mr. Redwood, now the honoured Emeritus Professor, was 
another of the men of fifty years ago to whom the Pharma- 
ceutical Society and chemists generally are hopelessly in- 
debted. Through the remaining eighteen years of his too 
brief life, during which Mr. Jacob Bell virtually directed 
the policy of the Pharmaceutical Society, Mr. Redwood was 
his loyal right hand. He was more than this. To his insight 
and pharmaceutical knowledge British pharmacy owed very 
largely the higher reputation which it won for itself in 
medical and scientific circles both in this country and 
abroad. The services of John Savory, Thomas Morson 
Peter Squire, William Ince, and of several prominent London 
wholesale druggists, which were given so cordially in the 
first decade of the Society's existence, cannot be disregarded 
as we trace its early records. But with a full [recognition 
of the value of the co-operation of so many influential men, 
it is pretty certain that the permanence of the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society and its jubilee this year are due to Jacob Bell. 
It is this conviction which induces us to give him so large a 
proportion of our historic appreciation. 
. Has the Society been a benefit to the trade ? and What 
would have happened if it had not been formed ? are ques- 
tions which occur in reflecting on its fifty years' history. 
We have no hesitation in answering the first question affirma- 
tively, and we should come to this conclusion the more cer- 
tainly from a consideration of the second problem suggested. 
No one conversant with the history of medical legislation 
during the present century will doubt that Parliament would 
have insisted on some regulation of the sale of poisons long 
before this on its own initiative, if necessary. And if there 
had been no Pharmaceutical Society it is fairly certain that 
the control of the vendors of poison would have been com- 
mitted to the Medical Council. How this might have affected 
chemists and druggists pecuniarily cannot be estimated : 
sentimentally the rule of the Medical Counoil would have 
proved intolerable. Pharmacists may sometimes claim to 
be an integral part of the medical profession ; but whatever 
the expression may mean at public dinners or on full-dress 
occasions, it certainly has never meant a willingness to sub- 
mit complacently to the authority which, it must be added, 
onr allies have always been ready to assume. 

The generation which furnished the men who founded the 
Pharmaceutical Society has, to a large extent, passed away, 
The names of less than a score of the founders appear as 
stewards of the forthcoming jubilee dinner. As representatives 
predecessors who associated themselves at some personal 
sacrifice in the hope of benefiting their successors, these 
men are worthy of our hearty respect. As far as we know 
them, the chemists and druggists of fifty years ago were a 
fine body of men. Not loDg ago Mr. Carteighe, in a public 
speech, rightly refused to assume that the pharmacists of 



the present day were as superior to their forerunners as 
with their advantages, they ought to be. It might be he' 
said, that the body had advanced, but, thinking of such men 
as those we know of— the men who founded the Pharmaceu- 
tical Society — he, for one, was not prepared to say that we 
produced better samples now. This opinion we endorse. 
Our chemists and druggists are now compelled by law to 
attain a certain standard, and this perhaps ensures our 
aggregate improvement ; but it is very doubtful whether our 
compulsory system has developed a larger proportion of 
high-minded, conscientious pharmacists than is told of in 
the days when anyone might, if he liked, assume the title 
and functions of a chemist and druggist. To put the 
matter pertinently, we may ask : Are there as many " his- 
toric pharmacies " being founded now as in the earlier years 
of the century ? 



DR. STEVENSON'S REPORT. 

De. Thomas Stevenson, the Government visitor to the 
Board of Examiners for England and Wales, wastes little 
time in sending in his reports. That for the year ending 
March 31 was deposited with the Privy Council a day or 
two thereafter and forwarded to the President of the Phar- 
maceutical Society on April 6 — only a' day or two later than 
last year. Instead of placing it before the Council the 
President has on this occasion chosen the Pharmaceutical 
Journal as his medium for publicity. 

In spite of all we hear about the drug trade going to the 
dogs, the number of persons entering it suffers no serious- 
diminution. There were 1,355 candidates for the Prelimi- 
nary examination last year, showing a trifling decrease ; but 
594 of these^ succeeded in getting over the stile, and that, we 
take it, is more than enough to meet the wear and tear of the 
trade. The number of failures, 761, is large, and on the face 
of it does not appear at all encouraging, especially when we 
look into details and find that 655 of the 761 who failed 
could not take 40 per cent, of marks in arithmetic, or, as Dr. 
Stevenson puts it, six out of seven of the rejected candidates 
failed in this subject. This does not mean that there were 
only 106 failures in Latin and English, for we take it that 
although Dr. Stevenson does not give us figures this year, 
the failures in these two subjects have been about their 
normal — in each case three-fifths of the arithmetic failures. 
Dr. Stevenson speaks about " elementary arithmetic." We 
should like to know what he means by that. It cannot be 
the arithmetic of the Preliminary examination of the Phar- 
maceutical Society of Great Britain, which is one of the 
most difficult papers set in the subject in this country. In 
the first place, the paper contains seven questions, for which- 
ninety minutes are allowed. The working of the answers to 
the questions has to be written out in full, which takes up 
much of the time. Then the questions take in a wide area 
of knowledge — viz., the simple and compound rules, gener- 
ally two questions; vulgar and decimal fractions, three 
questions ; the metric system, one question which does not 
deal with values alone ; and always there is one of those 
tricky questions which try the mental powers of the candi- 
date to the utmost. Here is an example as set in July 
last : — 

"A stationer sold quills at 11*. per thousand, by which he 
cleared j|- of his purchase money, but raised them to 13.?. 6d. 
per thousand on their growing scarce ; what did he clear 
per cent, by the latter price i " 

Questions such as this are not uncommon, they are far 
from being elementary and their presence in the examina- 
tion paper simply means so much deducted off the candidates' 
chance of passing. It is perhaps to be regretted that the 



554 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



f April 18, 1S9L 



Boards of Examiners have surrendered the entire control of 
the examination to the College of Preceptors. As far as our 
information goes the Boards simply receive the results ; the 
questions set never come before them for approval, although 
•the responsibility rests with them. It would be a decided 
advantage if the Boards exercised some control over the 
papers, especially in the direction of giving less work for the 
ninety minutes. This is very much wanted, for it is not mere 
ignorance which determines failure. Natural slowness 
accounts for something and is a factor which should be pro- 
vided against. 

The figures for the Minor examination are more cheering 
than those of the Preliminary. There were 919 candidates, 
■ of whom 381 passed and 538, or 58 5 per cent., failed, as 
•compared with 61 5 per cent, of failures in 1889. Year by 
year the improvement in the curriculum subjects increases, 
as the following figures show : — 





1888 


1889 


1890 




468 


492 


585 


„ in chemistry 


90 


79 


69 


„ „ botany 


29 


25 


20 


„ „ materia mcdica 


t>7 


50 


67 


„ „ pharmacy 


59 


76 


93 


„ „ pre eriptions .. 


44 


51 


67 


„ „ dispensing 


114 


154 


196 



We called attention three years ago to the fact that in the 
very subjects upon which the Pharmaceutical Council are 
urging a compulsory course of study candidates are strongest, 
and are steadily improving. That statement is as applicable 
to-day as it was in 1888. Up to then there had been im- 
provement, and it has continued since. In spite of this fact, 
•of which he is perhaps not fully cognisant, Dr. Stevenson 
says in his report : — 

" In chemistry the lack of systematic training and manipu- 
lative experience are patent. Indeed, too often it is manifest 
that the candidates have had neither proper teaching in the 
theory of the science nor laboratory instruction. 

" So long as no course of instruction is obligatory this state 
of things may be expected to continue. I trust, however, 
that at no distant date pharmacists will recognise that the 
interests of their business will not be in conflict with public 

• opinion, that the accurate study of the sciences bearing on 
pharmacy is indispensable. 

" I desire to express my sense of the thorough and careful 
manner in which the examiners carry out the responsible 
•duties entrusted to them. If my criticisms seem severe, 
they are directed rather to the defects in the training of 
candidates than to the examinations themselves." 

Obviously, Dr. Stevenson warmly supports the compulsory 
curriculumists, thus reversing the policy of his predecessor, 
the late Dr. Greenhow ; who, after much longer experience 

• of pharmaceutical candidates and the public requirements 
of pharmacy, was decidedly of opinion that the Minor 
•examination alone was an adequate and safe test of fitness 
for exercising the functions of the chemist and druggist. 
The failures in chemistry now do not warrant any change of 
view, and the pharmacists whom Dr. Stevenson so directly 
•addresses, as well as the Privy Council representing the 
public, have aright to ask him if any of the 850 candidates 
who passed the examination in chemistry were unsafe men. 
It must not be forgotten that the State does not require 
Minor candidates to be as proficient in the science of che- 
mistry, as, say, bachelors of science : enough to make the 
•custodians and sellers of poisons fit for that position is all 

that is wanted. Looking at the results in chemistry, as well 
as in botany and materia medica, the advocates of higher edu- 
cation have every reason to be satisfied, and if legislators do 
not meet their views in regard to compulsion, they may look 



to the new examination schedule as a means of producing 
that thoroughness which they desire. 

The most serious part of Dr. Stevenson's report is that 
in which he comments on the failures in shop subjects. He 
says : — 

"The large number of failures in prescriptions and in dis- 
pensing is significant, these being the two branches of 
examination which are most practical and most important 
in the interests of the public. The ability to read and pro- 
perly interpret prescriptions, and accuracy and care in the 
dispensing of medicines, are rightly deemed all-important. 
I have observed that a considerable number of failures are 
brought about by mistakes as to quantities of potent drugs 
and poisons. Such errors are inexcusable, and rightly lead 
to rejection." 

The fluctuations in dispensing within recent years are 
alarming, undoubtedly. We drew attention to the matter 
in 1886, when failures in dispensing comprised more than 
one-third of the total number of rejections. In 1887 
the failures in this subject fell from 38 to 31 per cent., 
in 1888 to 24 per cent., then in 1889 there was an increase 
to 31 per cent., and last year to 36 per cent, of the total 
number of failures. The immediate result, therefore, of the 
improvement in the manner of conducting the dispensing, 
introduced in 1889, has been an increase in the failures. 
Candidates now get a larger selection of work, and more 
time to do it in, thus giving them better opportunity of 
showing their skill. Apparently it has also enabled the 
examiners to more abundantly detect want of skill. The 
shop subjects come out altogether badly, the failures indi- 
cating that apprentices do not receive proper training. It 
may be that the want of a reasonable interval between the 
Preliminary and the Minor is to blame, and it may be that 
the three years, which the Pharmacy Bill proposes, will 
counteract the evil ; it is, at least, a sound principle to go 
upon to recognise the Preliminary examination as the °n- 
trance to the calling, and to make the three years' engage- 
ment in dispensing medical prescriptions date from that. 
But the gravity of the matter, as it stands, is no less 
lightened by the prospect of reform, for at present a large 
majority of those who pass the Preliminary examination are 
schoolboys, or have recently left school, and but a small 
percentage is made up of those who are out of their teens. 
Moreover, every Minor candidate has at present to produce 
a certificate of having dispensed for three years. The ideal 
conditions, therefore, practically obtain now. What more, 
then, can an Act of Parliament do for us ? Is there not 
something to be done amongst ourselves / Better training 
of apprentices, better regard for the conditions of their ser- 
vice, and a little more of the old-fashioned respect for the 
honour which attaches to turning out well-trained lads 1 The 
weakness in the shop subjects is really the serious part of 
Dr. Stevenson's report, and, if this is not the result of in- 
creased stringency on the part of the examiners, he is none 
too severe regarding it. Pharmaceutical Councils, Boards 
of Examiners, and Houses of Parliament can do little to 
remedy it : masters themselves must look to the matter. 



THE AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL- 
ASSOCIATION. 

Fbom Volume 38 of the " Proceedings of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association," which we have recently re- 
ceived, we observe that American pharmacists are more 
particular than their confreres on this side of the Atlantic 
in recording all that takes place at their annual gathering. 
It is not easy to ascertain exactly what the membership of 
the British Pharmaceutical Conferenre is. Perhaps the 



Ap.il 18. 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



555 



•executive itself does not know, for the annual roport men- 
tions not the number. We judge from the subscriptions 
.paid that it is 1,406 or thereabout. The American associa- 
tion gives the actual figures of its strength — 1,367 " in good 
standing." That was how it stood when it met at Old Point 
Comfort, Va., last year. In view of the next annual meeting, 
which will be held in a few weeks, some statistics regarding 
the association are not without interest. It will be remem- 
bered that the association is to visit the Sunny South on 
April 27. New Orleans has given the members a hearty 
invitation, and as they have been going to extremes of late 
years they are to give that city a trial before the yellow- jack 
season comes on. The first meeting of the association was 
held in Philadelphia, Pa., on October 6, 1852, and meetings 
have been held without interruption annually ever since, but 
none so early in the year as April. The number of the 
volume before us indicates that the association has published 
*' Proceedings " every year, and bulky though they be nowa- 
days, and have, indeed, always been, funds have gradually 
increased until the investments now amount to £11,794.46. 
The accounts submitted at the last meeting were excellent, 
but they slightly belie the report of the committee on mem- 
bership, a sum of £5,585 having been received in fees for 
0.889 and 1890, an amount which represents 1,117 members. 
Fees for years before and after these only add forty- eight to 
the membership. The total income oE the association for 
the year was £7,452.48, of which £1,224.98 was derived from 
the sale of the National Formulary, a venture which has paid 
-exceedingly well (it is two-thirds profit). Amongst the dis- 
bursements we find Professor John M. Maiscb, the general 
secretary, credited with £750 salary and £205 travelling 
expenses ; Mr. Diehl, the reporter on the Progress of Phar- 
macy — i c, the editor — gets the same salary; and the trea- 
surer's salary is £600 Other salaries bring the total under 
that heading to £2,300 (460Z.) Our own Conference dis- 
bursements of less than 200Z. per annum for salaries appear 
cnode3t in comparison, and it is not surprising that when 
a committee was appointed to consider how the expenses 
of the American association might be controlled so as 
not to exceed the income from annual fees, the first 
"thing proposed was a reduction of salaries all round. 
The members, however, would not hear of such economy, but 
agreed to savings equal to £150. It is not surprising that 
the committee's report was mainly negatived. The associa- 
tion's income at present exceeds its expenditure, this circum- 
stance having been brought about by the sale of the National 
Formulary, and there is no immediate necessity for retrench- 
ment. The most costly item in the accounts is the " Pro- 
ceedings," the printing and binding of which is put down at 
£1,977. This item is in striking contrast with the kindred 
line in the accounts of our Conference. We take it that 
each association prints about an equal number of copies. 
The American work is much bulkier than the " Year Book," 
having 850 pages to the latter's 550, and much of the matter 
in the former is in smaller type. It would be fair to say 
that the American volume contains about twice as much 
matter as the British one, yet an edition of the latter costs 
£1,480 to print. Where British smartness comes in is in 
getting £550 worth of advertisements. Go-ahead as the 
Americans are, they have not got that length yet. There 
seems to be no branch or phase of pharmacy which the 
editor of the American " Proceedings " does not touch — from 
the fitting of a shop or the dressing of a window to improve- 
ments in percolation and the latest knowledge regarding the 
constitution of alkaloids. The volume for 1890 is illustrated 
— we cannot say copiously, the number of cuts being under 
-fifty — and the work put into the editing is such that we 
should say the salary of Mr. Diehl is the last item of 



expenditure which should be reduced. He exercises great 
catholicity in the selection of material, the literature of 
Kuropo furnishing tho greater part of the abstracts, and, we 
may say, the more valuable parts ; for American pharmacy 
is not at its most brilliant epoch at present. There are good 
men in it, but they all appear to have taken to their scientific 
coffins, and there is no evidsnce of living Parrishs, Procters, 
or Bothers in it to continue the record which the founders of 
American pharmacy began. Considering that the majority 
of American pharmacists are college-bred men, it is sur- 
prising that no pharmaceutical research of first importance 
has been published since the last meeting of the association, 
and even the papers read at that meeting were, as a whole, 
of secondary importance. It is hopeless to expect the State 
associations to gather the first order of workers around them ; 
the place for them is the National Association, and it would 
be good for American pharmacy if its votaries would give 
anti-cutting plans a rest for a few months and devote them- 
selves to percolators and retorts. The plans are at present 
getting all the attention, and higher pharmacy little or 
none. 



FLOODING THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 

Not the least interesting among the results of the immense 
expansion which the boundaries of our empire have under- 
gone in Africa and Asia during the last five years, and of the 
extraordinary revival of the feelings of kinship among the 
scattered parts of the Empire are the numerous schemes to 
render the outlying portions of Greater Britain more produc- 
tive and to utilise their latent resources to a greater extent 
than heretofore. To say that, from climatic and economic 
standpoints, there is scarcely a natural product which can- 
not be produced within the limits of the British dominions 
is a truism so trite that we almost apologise for repeating it, 
and general sympathy with all efforts to increase the pro- 
ductivity of any part of the Empire and enhance the well- 
being of its inhabitants, may be similarly assumed. But 
enthusiasm for Colonial development has its dangerous side. 
And to no one should the reverse of the medal be more ap 
parent than to the produce merchant, who with an inteUi- 
gent interest keeps himself informed of the new sources of 
production of the raw materials of industry, and compares 
their probable supply with the demand which may fairly be 
expected for them. The drug importer in particular enjoys 
unusual means of observation on this point. No other mer- 
chant draws his raw materials from so many sources, and 
there is probably no other trade in which the grades of use- 
fulness of any given article, from the almost absolutely 
valueless to the highest excellence, are liable to vary so much 
as in his. 

To the produce importer, who sees the probability and 
often actually experiences the difficulties attending the 
glut of his market by the introduction of new developments 
of enterprise, the proverbial benefactor who enriches the 
world with that often-mentioned additional blade of 
grass, is not always so welcome as he expects 
to be. The authorities of the Boyal gardens at 
Kew, who are doing eminently useful experimental 
work in connection with the acclimatisation of pro- 
duce, are not free from the risk of allowing their zeal to 
outrun their discretion, from the importer's point of view. 
It may be suggested even to them that in selecting their 
new investigations they might at least first ascertain ap- 
proximately the world's requirements and capabilities of 
absorption. A case in point has occurred this week. Before 
tho Royal Colonial Institute, on Tuesday night, Mr. Morris, 
the energetic assistant-director of Kew Gardens, read an 



556 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1881. 



interesting paper on the " Leeward Islands " — that little 
group of western paradises entwining the Caribbean Sea 
with a girdle of fragrant verdure. Mr. Morris has previously 
spent many years in botanical pursuits in the Antilles, and 
has just returned home, filled withjre-awakened memories of 
the unexhausted fertility of the Antilles. He talks of their 
wonderful productiveness, and purges the investment of a 
*' moderate amount " of capital in their development. 
Dominica produces aunually about 8,0007. worth of 
lime-juice ; and in Montserrat a thousand acres are 
covered with lime plantations. The profits, as a 
communicative planter rashly explained to him, as it were 
with a view of inviting others to come and compete, are 
large. An outlay of 1,0007. will establish a 20-acre planta- 
tion in full working order, with works and plants complete, 
and defray the expenses of supervision for seven years. At 
the end of that time the estate would yield at the rate of 
40 hogsheads of concentrated lime-juice, worth 40Z. each, 
or 4807. ; while the yearly cost of cultivation and manufac- 
ture would be about half that amount, leaving 2407. as the 
net annual profit. If the industry is such a profitable one 
at the present time, the happy lime-juicers of Dominica had 
better rest content in their modern Arcadia, instead of 
bragging of their gains to the promiscuous visitor ; but what 
prospect is there, we ask, that this rate of profit would be 
maintained if, say, the acreage under cultivation were 
doubled or trebled ? So with gambier. The Kew authori- 
ties have lately been paying special attention to this valu- 
able tanning material, and numerous attempts at its 
propagation are being made in the West India islands. The 
United States being among the largest consumers of gambier, 
it is certainly reasonable to expect that, if they could obtain 
it as cheaply at their own doors, they would not go to the 
Straits Settlements for it. But while we do not say that 
there is not room far an increased output of gambier, it 
should be borne in mind that its manufacture in 
the Straits Settlements is practically a monopoly of the 
Chinese, who have thus far been the only people who can 
make the cilture pay. What Chinese competition would 
mean, if it is a question of producing cheaply, there is no 
need to particularise. Are our West Indian colonies pre- 
pared, at a time when Australia and the States are com- 
pelled to exclude Chinese from their labour markets, to rush 
in where the European planters of the Straits Settlements 
have hitherto feared to tread ? It is not quite enough that 
the warm moist valleys of Dominica are likely to suit the 
gambier-plant in every way. The question is, whether the 
planters there could face the possibility of a fall in the value 
of the manufactured product to say 107. per ton, instead of 
the 40Z. which it realises now. Again, we are informed that 
"spices, such as nutmeg and mace, vanilla, black pepper ) 
cubeb pepper, long pepper, cloves, ginger, cinnamon, carda- 
moms are already introduced into this part of the world- 
The demand for spices is increasing, and these islands could 
grow every one of those mentioned, if only the people would 
give their attention to them and treat them according 
to their special requirements." But is it not a 
fact that the cultivation of nearly every one of 
these products is already, if not overdone, at least 
so fully provided for that further competition can only prove 
disastrous from a financial point of view ? Pepper, for in- 
stance, is almost exclusively produced and brought into 
commerce by Chinese cheap labour; vanilla is a product 
the cultivation of which requires not only unremitting care 
but a dexterity only to be acquired by practice, and any con- 
siderable addition to the production of Mauritius, the 
Seychelles and Mexico, would send prices down to the lowest 
v erge of remunerativeness. The commercial history of cubebs 



records price-fluctuations from 35s. to 307. per cwt. within a 
few years. The increase in value of the article has led t o an 
enormous extension of cultivation in Java, and the value of 
the drug — which, it should be remembered, is one of com- 
paratively small significance — has fallen 100 per cent, within 
the last few months, while the exports from Java have 
risen from 118 piculs in 1888 to 1,373 piculs in 1890. Essen- 
tial oils scarcely offer greater promise. With those which are 
produced in France and Italy it would require not only a con- 
siderable capital, but also a vast fund of practical experience 
to cope. Our knowledge of the chemistry of essential oils is 
as yet so limited, and adulteration so difficult of detection 
that buyers are compelled to rely very largely upon the 
honour and commercial reputation of the growers with whom 
they deal ; hence custom and prejudice prevail in this trade 
to an almost incredible extent. A slight innovation — often 
of the nature of an undoubted improvement— in the packing 
of an essential oil is usually sufficient to render the sale of 
the new product unremunerative, as anyone knows who is 
acquainted with the wholesale markets. Oils of lavender, 
eucalyptus, peppermint, geranium, clove, rose, petit- 
grain, to mention only a few at random, are already distilled 
in quantities which would render any further competition 
ruinous. 

We have no desire to dissuade Colonial planters or in- 
tending investors of capital in Colonial enterprises from 
carrying out their intentions ; we only ask that they should 
consider the possibility of finding a market for their product 
before they lay out their plantations. Otherwise it is clear 
that within a few years the produce markets of the world 
will be flooded with merchandise from the newly-acquired 
or commercially-revived colonies in all parts of the world, 
for which there will be no outlet, and the disasters of the 
cinchona and shellac markets must inevitably be repeated on 
a larger scale than before. 



UNIFORM IMPERIAL, POSTAGE. 

The Imperial Federation League have published a pamphlet 
written by Mr. Robert J. Beadon, M.A, ably advocating a 
uniform postage for every part of the British Empire. The 
policy of the League is to link by all available considerations 
of interest and sentiment the populations in all parts of the 
British dominions, and in the advocacy of this programme: 
postage rates offer a very important field of operations. It 
is scarcely credible that until this year, 1891, the cost of 
postage of letters from France and Germany to India was half 
that charged from England. This anomaly has been remedied, 
but much more remains to be done, and it is a matter of 
commercial importance to Great Britain that every possible 
facility for communication with all probable customers 
should be provided. Mr. Beadon argues that it is quite 
possible to extend home-rates throughout the Empire. 




with but little, if any, lo3s to the Post Office. To accom* 
plish this he urges that the subsidies to mail steamship 



Ap.il 18 1891 I 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



557 



lines should be charged mainly as they formerly were on 
the Navy Estimates — the Lords of the Treasury having ex- 
pressly declared that this expense is "not justifiable upon 
postal reasons alone." Then he would have the British 
Post Office press for modifications of the unreasonable terms 
charged by France and Italy for the conveyance of mails to 
Brindisi ; and, finally, he proposes that something nearer 
freight-rates should be obtained from the ship companies. 
He shows, by an elaborate set of figures, that double first- 
class cargo rates on the most costly passage would still be 
less than a third of the amount now paid for all sorts of 
mail goods, letters, books, and newspapers put together. 
Mr. Beadon's pamphlet may be obtained for 6d. from 
Messrs. Cassell k Co., who publish it for the Imperial 
Federation League. The engraving preceding represents the 
stamp which the author suggests, not in lieu of any existing 
one, but as an additional one capable of being used in the 
Mother Country and in every British colony and dependency 



COMMENTARY. 



Keddening of Cabbolic Acid. — Kramer and Spelkir 
have found a new body in coal-tar, which they call indene, 
C„H,.C..H. CH 2 . They isolated it from crude benzol as a 
picrate. They say that the red coloration of naphtholin 
when treated with sulphuric acid is due to the formation of 
indene, and it is probable too that the red coloration of 
carbolic acid is allied to this. We do not seem to get to the 
end of the causes for carbolic acid becoming red. The red 
colour does no harm, it does not lessen the efficiency of the 
acid, and few pharmacists or physicians think anything 
about it, yet we are always getting some new explanation. 
No two chemists agree about the cause, and none have yet 
shown how to prevent the coloration. 

Cbystals op Platinum. — Professor Joly, of Trinity 
College, Dublin, announces in Nature that he has succeeded 
in producing small crystals of platinum by stretching 
ribbons of pure metal, sprinkling them with powdered 
topaz, and passing an electric current through the metal 
until it is red hot. In half-an-hour, if the metal is ex- 
amined under the microscope after removal of the topaz, it 
is found to have small and brilliant octahedral crystals 
adhering to the edges. Other forms also occur. Professor 
Joly says that the cause of the formation of the crystals is 
that fluorine is liberated at a high temperature from the 
topaz, which attacks the platinum, forming a fluoride, which 
again breaks up, depositing the crystals. This reaction is 
similar to what M. Moissan has already described. The 
same thing takes place with palladium. 

The Ownebship op Pbescbiptions. — A correspondent 
of the British Medical Journal states that the question of 
the ownership of prescriptions has been settled by law in 
New York, Massachusetts, and a few other States, to pertain 
to the druggist. The following is given as the text of a 
recent judicial pronouncement on the subject, where is not 
stated : — 

The question before the court seemi to be very simple indeed. A patient 
applies to a physician, nnd receives from him certain advice, for which he 
tenders a tee. The physloian bands a piece of paper to the patient, pur- 
porting to be a written order for certain goods called drugs, which order 
is filled by a merchant or apothecary. The payinsnt of the fee and the 
'lellray of the goods or drugs terminates the verbal contract, and the 
druggist keeps the prescription as an evidence that the contract has boon 
fulfilled eo far as he is concerned. The druggist can, if he so pleasj, on his 
own responsibility renew the drugs, for he is but a merchant, and bin a 
perfect right to pell drugs to anyone and In any sUipe. llo need not 
Jteep the pie^criptlon, nor is he bound to gi7C a copy; but should c.Tor 
rcyiz, he has n? prot:ctlou in ca?e of suit. 



It is said that some time ago a decision in the same sense 
was given by the judge of a court in Berlin. Our con- 
temporary, however, properly refuses to recognise such a 
ruling as sound ; the patient receives the prescription in 
return for the fee which he given to the physician, but he is 
under no obligation to give up the prescription to the 
druggist. He is bound to show it to him, or else he cannot 
get the drugs he wants, but the document belongs to the 
patient, who could, if he chose, enforce its return by action. 
A publisher might as well claim to keep an author's manu- 
script as evidence that he had correctly printed it, as a 
druggist to keep the prescription as evidence that he had 
fulfilled his contract to supply the drugs ordered of him. 

The Adultebation op Musk. — Mr. Th. Winimel, o 
Hamburg, writes to the Apotlveker Zeituwj on the subject o 
musk-adulteration as noticed by him. The musk which he 
examined was a bottle of grain musk bearing on its label the 
words " 15 oz. Thibet musk, pure grains." The seals were 
intact. The contents consisted partly of small globules from 
the size of a pea downwards, and partly of a homogeneous 
mass of small grains, mixed with a considerable quantity of 
hard white hairs, some nearly an inch long, others smaller. 
Under the microscope the globules, especially when moistened 
with turpentine, showed the formation of layers character- 
istic of true musk, but they proved to contain a certain 
admixture of starch granules, some free, some surrounded by 
a tender transparent coating. Vegetable cellular tissue was 
also present, indicating the use of a ground amylaceous seed 
as an adulterant. The colour was an even dark brown, and 
the flavour exceedingly penetrating. Dried upon the water- 
bath the musk lost 51 per cent, in weight, and upon incinera- 
tion left behind only 25 per cent, of a grey ash. Mr. 
Winimel's conclusion was that the musk was adulterated 
with vegetable matter (principally starch-flour) to the extent 
of 25 per cent., and moreover weighted with water. Mr. 
Winimel does not state what price he paid for the " musk," 
which surely is a Jpoint of importance. It may here be 
stated that musk of the character referred to by him is 
regularly met with at the London Drug Auctions, and, 
though in grain, is considered worth much less than known 
pure musk in pod. So far as the wholesale market is con- 
cerned there is scarcely any possibility of anyone being 
deceived in the purchase of musk of this character. Mr. 
Winimel also gives some particulars of the loss in weight in 
pod musk by drying, which he had found to vary from 6 to 
35 per cent. The musk obtained from one pod which he 
opened lost 28 per cent, in weight by drying. The German 
Pharmacopccia is silent upon the question of humidity of 
musk, but other Pharmacopccias demand that musk dried 
over sulphuric acid shall not lose more than 12 per cent. The 
ash residue of musk, according to the German Pharma- 
copoeia should not exceed 8 per cent. 

The Alkaloid pbom the Tubebcle Bacillus. — Al- 
though Koch says that his fluid does not contain a ptomaine, 
it does not follow that the tubercle bacillus does not evolve 
one. Indeed the announcement is made that Professor 
Zuelzer has succeeded in obtaining one by treating hydro- 
chloric acid extracts of tubercle cultures with platinic 
chloride, and splitting up the double salt formed. In this 
way an almost white crystalline salt was obtained, which 
was easily soluble in hot water, but with great difficulty in 
cold. Its solution was light yellow in colour. After keeping 
for some time the dry salt assumed a light-brown colour. 
The chloride when injected into rabbits and guinea-pigs 
exhibited a characteristic toxic action ; about one centi- 
gramme injected subcutaneously produced, after from 3 to 
5 nrnu»es, an increase in the frequency of recpiration, tho 



558 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



movements reaching 180 per minute. This continued for 
about a quarter of an hour, when the rate gradually became 
slower. The temperature rose in two out of the ten obser- 
vations from normal to 100 2° F. Another constant symptom 
was well-marked protrusion of the eyes, which also appeared 
bright and shining, with somewhat dilated pupils, which 
appearances disappeared in from 15 to 20 minutes. Toxic 
symptoms only showed themselves in three rabbits, and 
these had received somewhat larger doses, between two and 
three centigrammes having been administered. Death usually 
occurred somewhere between the second and fourth days. 
At the site of injections there was considerable redness, and 
small htemorrhages were found in the muscles immediately 
beneath. It will be noted that the symptoms produced are 
not unlike those of Koch's tuberculin. We may remark 
regarding that fluid that a 1-per-cent solution of it gives 
a turbidity with platinic chloride as well as with auric chloride. 

Titles in Phabmaoy. — They are at present exercised 
about titles in the United States : " boss," " clerk," and 
" boy," suffice to describe the three grades who work in the 
pharmacy; but "boss" is more familiar and general than 
respectful. No one thinks of designating himself as such, 
" pharmacist," the happy title coined in 1865 by Professor 
Parrish (it is said), being the favourite title " in conjunction 
with that of ' proprietor. 1 " Where the difficulty comes in is 
with the clerk and the boy. For the former Mr. A. E. Bbert 
proposes the title " prescriptionist " as being better than 
dispenser, assistant, or clerk; and doubtless the junior clerk 
or boy will feel proud of his new designation, " laborist." 
For " it is believed," says the Western Brut/gist, " that the 
adoption of such a title would tend to elevate the ' junior 
clerk ' to a better appreciation of his duties and responsi- 
bilities — that he would take more pride in his work in order 
that the distinction may really be warranted and promotion 
to the next grade be stimulated." All this is said, we may 
explain, in perfectly good faith and with a due degree of 
solemnity. 

New Soubce of Oxalic Acid.— A Prague chemist has 
devised a process for recovering oxalic acid from the waste 
liquors produced in manufacturing wood fibre by the sul- 
phite process. It is found that 100 parts of waste liquor 
give an average of 12 parts of dry residue on evaporation, 
which contains 9 5 parts of organic and 2'5 parts of mineral 
matter. The filtrate, which contains chiefly lime salts, be- 
sides the organic matters, is mixed with more than sufficient 
sulphuric acid to combine with the lime, the action being 
continued until all free and combined sulphurous acid is 
expelled, which may be condensed and utilised if desired. 
If any excess of sulphuric acid has been added, it is removed 
by carefully neutralising with lime or chalk. After settling, 
the purified liquors are concentrated to about 40° B. some- 
times to dryness. While still warm the mass is mixed with 
double its weight of a mixture of 2 parts of quicklime and 
1 part of caustic soda. This mixture is heated, with con- 
stant stirring, in iron vessels to a temperature of above 
180° C, whereby it is changed into oxalic acid, which 
combines with the bases, and is afterwards purified. 



Flash-light Fibe-alahm. — A Copenhagen gentleman 
proposes to utilise the flash-light as a fire-alarm. His 
arrangement consists of a small cartridge filled with Bengal- 
light composition, and provided with a fuse made from 
potassium chlorate and sugar. On the fuse is a paraffin 
capsule containing sulphuric acid. When the temperature 
of the room ris-s above the melting-point of paraffin, the 
sulphuric acid is liberated and ignites the mixture of chlorate 
and sugar, which in turn sets fire to the Bengal- light. I 



SHOP ETYMOLOGY. 
By Hedeb. 



AN amusing and instructive exercise can always be ob- 
tained for a spare hour by the study of a few words in 
such a book as Skeat's, to which reference was made by one 
of your correspondents last week. I propose to take some 
very " shoppy " words, and trace their origin or their passage 
through stages until we have them in common use. The 
extracts will be condensed as much as possible and the 
following abbreviations used : — 

A.r. Aryan root ; Skt. Sanscrit ; E. English ; M.E. Middle 
do. ; A.S. Anglo-Saxon ; G. German ; C. Celtic ; F. French j 
O.F. Old do.; Ital. Italian ; Span. Spanish; L.Latin; L.L. 
Low do. ; Gk. Greek. 

1. The Shop. — Shop (E.). A.S. sceoppa, a stall, booth. 
Allied to scypen, a pen for cattle. " Shippen " (a cow-shed)- 
is in constant use in the Midlands. Allied forms are : L.G., 
schup, a shed ; G. scliuppen, a shed, covert ; whence O.F. 
esolwppe, a shop. Compare with the Gk. slccpas, a cover. 

Counter (F.), the reckoning place. F. comptoir, from 
compter, later conter. Allied to L. computare, to compute : 
from putare, to think ; originally " to make clean," then " to- 
make clear, to come to a clear result." L. putus, clean 
A.r. pu. 

Shelf (E.). M.E. schelfe, slislfe, A.S. scylfe, plank, shelf ; 
originally a thin piece, a flake ; allied to " shell " and " skill." 
Low G. schelfem, to flake off. " Squill " has been mentioned 
as another derivative. A.r. skal = skab, to cut. 

Drawer (E.). M.E. drawen, to draw ; A.S. drayan ; allied 
to Skt. dhragh, to lengthen, to exert oneself. A.r. DHABGH. 

Connected with the shop are — 

Cellar (F.— L.). M.E. eeler ; O.F. celier; L. ceUarium r 
cella, a small room, a hut. Compare with L. celare, to hide- 
A.r. KAL. 

Warehouse (E.). M.E. ware ; A.S. ware ; pi. warn, wares,, 
probably valuables ; allied to A.S. warn, protection, guard, 
custody. 

House (E.). M.E. hous; A.S. Mis. Compare Skt. hosha,. 
Itoqa, a coop, sheath, abode. 

2. The Shopkeepers. — " Chemist " and " druggist " have- 
been given by Mr. Seaton. 

Assistant (F. — L.). As for ad, to ; sistere, from stare T 
to stand ; to step to, to stand to, to approach, to assist. 

Apprentice (F. — L.). From a dialectal French form, 
such as the Walloon apprenticlie, from Low L. apprenticing, 
a learner ; from ad, to, and prendere, for prebendere, to take 
hold of, to learn. 

Porter (L.), a carrier, from portare. A.r., PAB. "Porter" is 
substituted for M.E. jjortonr, from F. porteur. 

Errand-boy. Some disappointment in this word. One- 
naturally expected to find it derived from L. errare, to*, 
wander, or make a mistake. But it comes from M.E. 
erende, A.S. arendc, a message, business, a going, from A.r.. 
AB, to go. 

Boy (Old Low G.). M.E. boy. Allied to G. bube, a boy ; 
L. 2>ii]nis, a boy, whence " pupil." 

With these may be mentioned— Buy (E.). M.E. biiggen, 
biggin, to purchase. A customer yesterday used a word 
also derived from the same root : " I can't abide the smell 
of your drugs" — "Abide" meaning to suffer, pay for, or 
endure. 

Sell (E.). A.S. sellan, sillan, syllan, to hand over. A 
secondary verb derived from sale (Scand.), a sale or 
bargain. 

3. Money. — " The love of money is the root of all evil." 
Wise or otherwise, the warning is good. Afoncta (from L. 
monere, to warn), the Warning One, was a surname of Juno, 
in whose temple at Kome money was coined. " Money " is - 
F. — L. M.E. moneic, from O.F. moncie (F. monnaie). 
" Mint " is A.S., borrowed from L. moneta. 

Pound (L.). From pondus, a weight. M.E. pund; A.S. 
pund. Probably at first, the weight. 

Sovereign (F. — L.). The royal coin. O.F. souverain, 
from Low L. snperanns, chief, princely. L. super, above. 

Crown (F. — L.). M.E. corone, corounc (whence crouni). 
From O.F. corone (F. couronnc). L. corona, a wreath. 
Allied to Gk. Itoronis, horonos, curved. 

Florin ( F. — Ital — L.). About a. d. 1337. A coin of Florence 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



559 



bearing a lily, a symbol of that town, h.jlo.i. Ital. fivro 
From Flora, goddess of flowers 
Shilling (E). A.fc-. scilling. Thl base issKlL, to divide (a> 



"shelf.)" The suffix I Ing is a doc ^nVlfVVtjni |WsM<Q 
the name uncertain, but judging tfjO'lvM^lJw IvO 

words, means " divided " or " sma I moneys. 1 

Penny (L. with E. suffix). M.E. <cni, pi. pentifa qfWtofi 1 
form pens, whence "pence," Mo em E. A.s!]p^i%/T(-iit 
form penig, whence M.E. pcni. '1 \e oldest fo: 
from a base borrowed, through O .1 High G. from L.paunvs, 
a pledge. The literal sense is " ali ;tlcjiedge " — i c , a token, 
a coin. JVO 

Farthing (E.), literally a fouithmg of a penny. M.E. 
fvrthing. Older A.S. fcorth-a, |with double diminutive 
l-ing = feorthling. * • ' 

4. Weights. — Weight (E ). M.E. weght, wight. A.S. wiht, 
geiviht. " Weight " is from M.E. veghan ; A.S. wcgan, pt. t. 
of meg, to weigh. Allied to L. nchcre, Skt. vale, to carry. 
A.r. WAGH. 

Avoir-du-pois is F. The third word is O.F. from peiser, 
poi$er, later veser, to weigh; not horn jwndus, L. 

Troy- weight. So called from a weight used at the fairs at 
Troyes, a town S.E. of Paris. 

Ounce. (F. — L.). O.F. unce, L. unoia. Originally, a small 
weight. Compare Gk. onhos, weight, bulk. " Inch " is also 
derived from the same. M.E. inche, A.S. ynce. 

Drachm. Dram. — L.— G.). O.F. dramc, drachme. L. 
drachma. Gk. drachme, a handful, a drachma, used as a 
weight and a coin. Compare with dragma, as much as one 
can grasp, from dratsomai, I grasp. 

Scruple (F. — L.). F. scrupulc, a little sharp stone (" in a 
man's shooe," Cotgrave), hence a hindrance, a perplexity, 
doubt ; also a small weight. L. scrupulum, acc. of scrupulus, 
diminutive of scrnpus, a sharp stone. From A.r. SKBU, 
allied to skab, to cut. 

Grain. (F. — L.) M.E. grcin. O.F. grain. L. granum, a 
grain, corn. Cognate with E. corn. A.r. GAR. 

5. Measures. — Measure (F.L.) M.E. mesure; O.F. mesure ; 
L. mensura, from mensus, p.p. of metiri, to measure. A.r. 
MA. 

Gallon (F.). Origin unknown. M.E. galon, galun ; O.F. 
gallon, jalon, a large bowl, a gallon ; augmentative form of 
the word which appears as modern F. jail, a bowl. 

Qnart (F. — L.). A fourth part. Apparently short for 
quarter-tits. L. quatuor, four ; Skt. chatvar ; Aryan type, 
hivatwar. 

Pint (F. — Span. — L ). A spot, mark, painting ; named 
from a marked part of a larger vessel. L. picta, feminine of 
pictus, p.p. oipingere, to paint ; F. pinto; Span, pinta, a spot, 
a pint. 

Minim (F. — L.). From the superlative O.F. minimc, 
literally "very small." The positive form occurs in A.S. 
min, small. A.r. mi. 

Graduated is from L. gradi, to step, walk, go. " Gradu- 
ated " is, therefore, " by steps." A.r. GABDH. 

6. Dispensing.— Dispense (L. — F.). Bis, apart, and 
2>endere, to weigh ; O.F. dispenser, to dispense with. The 
L. dispensarc, to weigh out, is the frequentative form of 
dispendere. 

Prescription (L.). Something written before. Pre, 
before ; and scribere, to write, to scratch, or cut slightly. 
A.r. SKAKBH. 

Water (E.). A.S. mater; Dutch, water ; G. nasscr. Allied 
to Icel. vatu ; Dan. vaud ; Swed. vatten ; Goth, nato ; Buss. 
roda ; Gk. hudor ; L. unda ; Lith. wandu ; Skt. udun ; all 
from A.r. wad, to wet. 

Medicine (E\ — L.). O.F. medecine; L. medicina; from 
mederi, to heal. Base madh, to learn, to heal ; from A.r. 
MA, to think. 

Collyrium (Gk.). Originally a medicine for sore eyes, 
made up in small round cakes, like the buttons for fastening 
the wires of a lyre. Now used for the made-up lotion. 

Confection (L.). Something made up. Con, with ; and 
ficerc, to put together : p.p. confeotus. 

Draught (E ). From same word as " drawer," above. 

Electuary (F.—L.). M.E. letuaric; OF. lectuaire, dec- 
tuaire. L. elcctuarium, a medicine which dissolves in the 
mouth. Perhaps for clinctarium, from clingcre, to lick away ; 
or from Gk. ehleichcin, the same. " Linctus," from L. lingerc, 
to suck away. 

Elixir (Arabic) ■ el i/.tir, the philosopher'* stone. It has 



medicine made bv strong 

IIELtEBMf'lK 




been used to signify the liquor by which alchemists hope to 
hBmaata W — r — — -<• 



ii mtnl 



the quintessence of a drug, and a 
infusion, thicker than a tincture. 
L. — Gk.).— O.F. embrocation, from 
nent. Gk. cmbrccheiu, to soak in. 
iscript, noticed some short time ago 
name to an affusion. 
i/i/usn; from L. in- fund ere, to pour. 



A sixteenth-century man 
iiL ^Utaui peape, gave this 
nfWoiiYF.— L.). F. 

is*Tlie root of m my other words constantly used in 



pharmacy, as " diffuse," lo spread abroad; " refuse " (sub.), 
what is poured back. 

Injection (L.). Jn-ic 
water) is from the sam i. 
iacerc, to throw. Allied 

biniment (F.—L ), salve, ointment. From 
smear. Compare Skt. U, to melt ; ri, to ooze. 



*6 = iaccre, to throw. " Jet " (of 
Inctare, to fling, frequent, of 
o Gk. iaptcin, to^ throw. 

L. lincre, to 
A.r. bi. 

Lotion (L.), a washing ; from lauarc, to wash. ("Laven- 
der" is also derived from this word. It is the herb used for 
freshly-washed linen. The final letter is an E. addition to 
the F. lavandc.) 

Mixture (L.). From p.p. of minccre, to mix. This word 
" mix " is an E. form of mish, A.S. miscan, not borrowed 
from the L., but allied to it. Compare Skt. micra, mixed. 
Base mikbh, from A.r. mik, as in Gk. mignumi. 

Menstruum (L.), a solvent. A word in alchemy, irom 
some fancied connection with the phases of the moon ;. 
mentis, a month ; menstruum being Low L. 

Ointment (F. — L.). L. ungcrc, to anoint; Skt. avj, to 
smear; A.r. AG, ANG. In "ointment" the former t is due 
to confusion with anoint. The M.E. form is oinemcnt ; O.F. 
oignement. 

Physic (F. — L. — Gk.). Originally the healing art : hence, 
medicine. O.F. phisique, science of medicine ; L. pJiysica, 
natural science ; Gk. 2>hiisike, natural ; from phu ein, to pro- 
duce. Skt. bhu, to be ; L. fore ; E. be. A.r. bhu. 

Pill (F. — L.), a little ball, short for pilule. L. pilula, a 
little ball, a globule, diminutive of pila, a ball. 

Potion (F. — L.). Yxompotare, to drink. Skt.^a, to drink 
(tosh pot-aim, I drink). A.r. PA. 

Powder (F. — L.). M.E. poudre ; F. poudrc ; O.F. poldre, 
puldre. Formed with excrescent d from puluercm ; acc. of 
puluis, dust. Probably allied to pulsus, p.p. of pcllcrc, to 
drive about. 

Pessary (F. — L.). F. pessaire ; L. j?cssus (pessarium ?). 

Salt (E.). M.E. salt. A.S. sealt. L. sal. Gk. als. Skt. tara, 
which also means the coagulum of curds or milk, from sri, 
to go, to flow. A.r. SAB. "Salt" was originally an adj., 
answering to L. sahus, salted : sealt water = salted water. 

Solution (F. — L.). F. solution, from L. solutus, p.p. of 
solvere, to loose, solve. From so (for sc) apart, and lucre, to- 
loosen ; allied to Gk. lucin, to set free ; and to E. lose. 

Suppository (L.). Formed from sup (sub.), near, and 
ponere, to place. 

Syrup (F. — Span. — Arab.). F. syrop ; Span, xarope ; Arabic 
sharab, shurab. Arab root, shariba, he drank (whence 
" sherbet "), wine, beverage, syrup. 

Tincture (L.). Tincius, p.p. of tingerc, to dye. Gk. 
tengcin, to wet, to dye. 

The following adjectives are thus derived — 

Cool (E.). A.S. col, cool. From the strong verb appear- 
ing in Iceland, halo, to freeze ; pt. t. h6l. 

Cold (E ). M.E. cold, hold, adj. A.S. ccald, adj. Com- 
pare gelidus. 

Lukewarm (E.). M.E. luhc, liuk. Lukewarm is redundant 
= warm-warm; an extension of M.E. leir, tepid. Allied to- 
A.S. Ii/co, hlcorv, a shelter, Modern E. lee. 

Tepid (L.). 2'cjiidi/s, warm ; from teperc. Skt. tap, to bo 
warm. A.r. TAr. 

Hot (E.). M.E. hoot. A.S. hat. A.S. verb, htrtan, to 
heat. 

Boiling (F.—L.) O.F. boiltir; L. bullirc, to bubble up, 

boil. s 
7. Implements and Apparatus. — Implement (Low L.— L.). 

From im (in) and plere, to fill in, execute. Allied to Gk. 

plcox, full. A.r. pab. 

Apparatus (L.), gear ; L. apparatus, preparation, from ap- 

(ad) and jxirarc, to get ready. 

Book (E.). M.E. booh ; A.S. bor, of which the original 

sense was beech-tree. Books were originally writings 

scratched on a becchen board. Allied to L. fagus, Gk.. 

phegos. A.r. biiag. 



550 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18 1891. 



Bottle (F.— Low L. — Gk.). A hollow thing. M.E. hotel 5 
F. bouteille. Low L. buticula dimin. oE butica ; Greek butts* 
boutis. Perhaps allied to " butt " and " boot." 

Box (L.). M.E. box ; A.S. box ; L. buxum, anything made 
of boxwood. From L. buxus, the box- tree. 

Cork (Span. — L). Spanish corcho ; L. codicem, acc. of 
cortex, bark. 

Flame (F. — L.). O.F. flame, Jlamtne, h\bo flambe. 1i.flam.ma 
( = flagma), from flag rare, to burn ; allied to Gk. phlcgein, 
to burn. A.r. bhabg. 

Gallipot (Dutch). Corruption of 0. Dutch gleypot, a 
glazed pot ; allied to G. glatt, smooth, and to E. glad 
(shining face). 

Pot (Celtic). M.E. pat ; Irish pota ; Gaelic poit ; Welsh 
2>ot ; Bret, pod ; whence also F. and Du. pot, &c. A drink- 
ing-vessel. Compare L. potare, to drink. 

Gas ( Dutch). The Belgian chemist. Van Helmont (died 
a.d. 1644) invented two words, " gas " and " bias " ; the 
latter did not come into use. Gas seems to have been sug- 
gested by Dutch gheest, spirit, volatile fluid (E. gJiost). 

Glass (E.). A.S. glees ; G. glas. Original sense, 
" shining." A.r. ghab. 

Ink (F— L— Gk.). M.E. ente ; O.F. enque (F. encre). 
L. cncauitum, the purple ink used by the later Roman Em- 
perors, neuter of encauslus, burnt in; Gk. en, in ; haio, I burn. 

Jar (F. — Persian). O.F. jave, " a jarre " (Cotgrave); Per- 
sian, jarrah. Compare Persian jurrah, a little cruse, a jar. 

Jug (Hebrew). Drinking vessels were formerly called 
Jacks, Jills, and Jugs, all of which represent Christian 
names. "Jug" and "Judge" were usual as pet female 
names ; and Skeat supposes they stand for Judith. 

Knife (E.). M.E. Jmif, pi. hu-ues (with«= r). A.S. euif, 
literally " an instrument for nipping or cutting off." Base 
knib or knip, whence also E. nip. 

Mortar, Morter (L.). M.E. mortcr ; A.S. mortere. L. mor- 
tarium. Compare L. martulits, a hammer. A.r. mar, to pound. 

Pan (L.). lA.'E.,pauns ; A.S. panne. Low "L.panna. Cor- 
rupted from L. 2>atina, a shallow bowl, pan, basin. 

Pen (F. — L.). O.F. pc/ine ; li.pcnna, a feather ; O.li.pcsna. 
From A.r. PAT, to fly. 

Slab (Scand.), a thin slip of timber or stone ; or, sawn 
timber. M.E. slab. Put for dap, allied to prov. E. slape, 
slippery. " Sleeper," timber for rails, is explained thus. 

Spatula (L. — Gk ). L. spatula, diminutive of spalha (Gk. 
spatke), a broad blade. 

Board (E ). M.E. bord ; A.S. bord, board, side of a ship, 
a plank. Hence the modern use for a piece of wood, &c. 

Card (F. — Gk.). Corruption of F. carte ; Low L. carta ; 
L. charta (Gk. charte), a leaf of paper. 

Chip (E.). Diminutive form of " chap " or " chop " = to 
cut a little at a time. " Chap " and " chop" (M.E. chappen, 
■choppen, not found in A.S.), from A.r. skab. 

String (E.). A.S. strcnge, cord; from its being tightly 
twisted. Compare Gk. straggalc, a halter, from straggos, 
tightly twisted. 

Paper (L— Gk. — Egyptian ?). M.E. paper, directly from 
L. papyrus ; Gk. papuros, a rush or flag. Probably of 
Egyptian origin. 

Wood (E.). M.E. mode; A.S. wndu, original form being 
widu. Perhaps allied to " withy " (from wi, to twine). 

Distill (F.— L.). O.F. distiller ; L. distillarc, destillare, to 
drop down. From de, down, and stillare, to drop, from stilla, 
a drop. " Still," the apparatus, is short for M.E. stillatorie. 

Evaporate (L.). From p.p. of euaporare ; e, out of, and 
uapor, vapour. A.r. KWAP. 

Macerate (L.), to soften by steeping. From p.p. of mace- 
rare, frequentative of a base, mac. Gk. masscin, to knead ; 
Skt. mach, to pound ; A.r. mak. 

Empty (E.), void. M.E. cmpti; AS. irmtig, literally "full 
of leisure." From A S. avita, oemetta, leisure. 

Fall (E.), complete. A.S. ful. Skt. purna ; Gk. pleres; 
L. plcnus ; A.r. pab. « Fill " (k.S. fyllan) is formed from ful 
by vowel-change. 

This list of words in constant use in our business may be 
extended almost indeSnitely. For a complete list of eog- 
nate, related, and illustrative words in other languages, 
reference must be made to Skeat's dictionaries and other 
works. I have not attempted to classify words derived from 
the various main sources ; but in reading through the above, 
■one obtains a good idea of the approximate dates of the 
•introduction of ideas and uses into our profession. 



THE TEETH IN RELATION TO HEALTH. 



MR. W. RUSHTON, L.D.S., gave the Chemists' Assistants' 
Association a lecture on this subject last week. In 
the course of it he said that the teeth in the human subject 
consist of thirty-two ivory-like masses, all differing in size 
and shape, and inserted in the bone of the upper and lower 
jaws in the form of elliptical arches, the upper arch being 
the larger. When the mouth is closed, the cusps of the 
teeth are interlocked, and every tooth antagonises more or 
less two teeth of the opposite jaw. The bulk of each tooth 
is composed of a dense, ivory-like substance called dentine, 
which is covered on the root of the tooth by a substance 
identical with hard bone, called cementum, and covered on 
the crown by enamel. Enamel is the hardest tissue of the 
human body, containing only from 3 to 1 per cent, of 
animal matter, being chiefly composed of carbonate and 
phosphate of calcium and magnesium, and calcium fluoride. 
It is sufficiently hard to strike a spark from steel, like a flint. 
It was primarily derived from the epithelium, or scarf-skin ; 
thus it becomes a modified skin, whilst the dentine, of which 
the bulk of the tooth is composed, is derived from the 
mucous layer below the epithelium. Lime salts are slowly 
deposited, and the tooth-pulp or " nerve " is the last remains 
of what was once a pulpy mass of the shape of the future 
tooth. 

The thirty-two permanent teeth are preceded by twenty 
temporary or deciduous teeth. These are fully erupted at 
about two years of age, and at about six years of age a won- 
derful process of absorption sets in by which the roots of the 
temporary teeth are removed to make room for the advancing 
permanent ones, and the crowns of the former, having no 
support, become loose and fall away. The phenomena of 
the eruption and succession of teeth are little understood. 
One would naturally suppose that the advancing perma- 
nent tooth was a powerful factor in the absorption of its 
temporary predecessor, but there were many facts to prove 
that it had no influence whatever. A child of six who has 
not lost any temporary teeth has in its jaws, either erupted 
or non-erupted, no fewer than 52 teeth more or less 
formed, and the compact manner in which they would 
remain in the jaw ready to come down to take their places 
in turn was as interesting as it was beautiful. 

In carnivorous animals the teeth are of a cutting or in- 
cisive form, the lower closing inside the upper. In herbivo- 
rous animals they are broad and flat, like small grindstones. 
In man we have a combination of the two, which leads us 
to believe, in spite of the vegetarians, that man is intended 
to be an omnivorous animal. 

There is no disease of the teeth so prevalent as dental 
ciries. Although enamel is so seemingly indestructible, there 
is no tissue of the body which so easily falls a prey to dis- 
ease. Sir John Tomes says : " Caries is an effect of ex- 
ternal causes, in which ' vital ' forces play no part. That it 
is due to the solvent action of acids which have been 
generated by fermentation going on the the mouth, organisms 
having no small share in the matter ; and when once the 
disintegrating process is established at some congenitally 
defective point, the accumulations of food and secretions in 
the cavity will intensify the mischief by furnishing fresh 
supplies of acid." 

Acid is therefore the great enemy of the teeth, and when 
the enamel is dissolved the bacilli and micrococci always 
present in the mouth appear upon the scene, and feed upon 
the gelatinous matrix of the dentine. Mr. Rushton pro- 
ceeded to discuss the question, " How is it that dental 
caries is so prevalent?" On examining the skulls of our 
forefathers the dentist is struck with three interesting 
peculiarities : (1) the total absence of caries : (2) the great 
wearing away of the teeth ; and (3) the large and finely 
developed jaw. 

Bret Harte in one of his poems asks "Is civilisation a 
failure ? " and Mr. Rushton admitted that as regards teeth 
it is. Our jaws are smaller than those of our ancestors, and 
our teeth, worn away by disease instead of use, are over- 
crowded and irregular. One reason of this is our artificial 
diet, and another may be traced to natural selection. Fur- 
ther, the jaws being composed of softer tissue than that of 
the teeth whioh they contain, changes take place more 



April is, 1891.1 THE CHEMIST 



quickly in them than in the teeth, therefore the jaws are 
getting smaller and teeth remaining more the same size, the 
consequence being overcrowding, whioh is a most active 
agent in producing caries. Added to these are our artificial 
mode of life, improper food containing too little teeth- 
forming material, and dyspepsia, in which we have sufficient 
explanation of the cause of tooth deterioration. 

Two of the most common diseases of the present day are 
neuralgia and indigestion, and although specialists are 
inclined to think that every malady is closely connected with 
the disease of which they make a specialty, yet a very large 
proportion of the two diseases named arises from tooth 
trouble. Dr. MacNaughton Jones, in a very interesting and 
able paper on " Dental Reflexes," points out that neuralgia 
and lesions of the eye, ear, and other parts of the head and 
face are directly attributable to carious teeth, and that in 
many cases relief and cure followed only after extraction. 

The British public show too much apathy about the care 
of their teeth. We must not look upon a tooth as an 
isolated member, but as a part of a beautiful and symmetrical 
organisation. When a troublesome grinder comes out not 
one in a thousand reflects that he has deprived himself of 
the use of its antagonists also. Frequently the teeth 
contiguous to the one extracted tilt over, and thus form a 
poor grinding surface. When a tooth has lost its antagonist 
the tendency is for it to elongate, loosen, and come out. 
Then when the back tetth are lost food is improperly 
masticated by nibbling with the front teeth, which are un- 
equal to the strain, and indigestion is the inevitable result. 
The sufferer too often seeks to cure the disease without 
remedying the cause, and, of course, fails. All the pepsin 
and bismuth in the world will not make up the loss of 
masticatiDg teeth. 

The remedies for this state of things are:— (1) Strict 
personal attention to the teeth. They should be cleaned at 
night. (2) A conservative treatment, having them pre- 
served when necessary by the process of stopping or filling, 
which when efficiently performed is one of the mosb success- 
ful operations in any branch of surgery ; and (3) State 
control. 

The amount of tooth disease amongst the poorer classes is 
truly astonishing. Mr. Rushton, as dental assistant at the 
Evelina Hospital, Southwark. has had every opportunity for 
observing this, and the condition of the mouths of the chil- 
dren of the poor he could only describe as "shocking." 
He strongly recommended that dentists should be attracted 
to all the services under Government, and that the State 
should provide trained dentists to look after the children in 
our board schools. In reference to our soldiers and sailors, 
after spending enormous sums in making the m good fighting 
machines, we grudge them the attention to a disease which 
at the present day causes more direct and indirect suffering 
than any other in our country, and a man wno could not 
feed well could not march well nor fight well. 



PARLIAMENTARY. 



The Pharmacy Bill. 

The second reading of this Bill was to have been taken on 
Wednesday, but on Tuesday it was deferred until Wednes- 
day, May 4. Notice was given on the same day by Mr. 
James Hozier, member for the southern division of Lanark- 
shire, to move on the second reading of the Bill " that it be 
read a second time this day six months." 



The Supply of Dbugs to the Abmy. 

In the House of Commons on Tuesday, Mr. Arthur 
O'Connor asked the Secretary of State for War whether any 
steps had yet been taken, in accordance with his promise of 
last year, to secure for the public the advantages of open 
competition or limited competition for the supply of drugs, 
and medical comforts and appliances, and surgical instru- 
ments to the army. 

Mr. St. John Brodrick: The supply of drugs and medical 
appliances has been put up to limited competition, and the 
contract has fallen to Messrs. Herring. No change has been 



AND DRUGGIST. 



made in regard to surgical instruments, experience will show 
whether the public will gain by the change of system. 

Mr. A. O'Connor: May I ask the bon. gentleman who 
decided on the list of contractors who should be invited to 
competition. 

Mr. Brodrick : It was decided by the Secretary of State 
after Committee inquiry. 

Mr. A. O'Connor : Why was the name of Messrs. Lescher 
& Evans, one of the largest firms in the trade, omitted? 

Mr. Brodrick : I am unable to give a detailed answer off 
hand. 



Ether-drinking in Ireland, and the Ageing of 
Spirits. 

Evidence on this subject was given on Tuesday before the. 
Select Committee of the House of Commons on British and 
foreign spirits, Sir Lyon Playfair presiding. 

Dr. Pavy said he had read the evidence on the subject, 
and had taken steps to ascertain from medical men in the 
districts where this practice was alleged to prevail whether 
the statements which had been made were true or not. He 
had addressed letters to forty-five medical men in these 
districts, and had received twenty replies so far. One said : 
" Ether is sold by grocers and druggists, and consumed on 
market-days — mostly by Roman Catholics who do not drink 
whisky. I knew a man who could drink half a pint without 
any apparent result." Another remarked : " Some years ago 
it was sold across the counter by chemists and druggists in 
drachm doses for Id,, chiefly to people from the mountains. 
It renders those addicted to drinking it liable to gastric 
ulcer " One had heard of one or two deaths resulting from 
the habit, severe gastric inflammation being set up very 
rapidly. "The people," this correspondent says, ' like it 
because they can get drunk upon it quickly, and because 
they recover in a very short time." Others say that the 
habit is dying out, and that chemists who sold large quan- 
tities of ether a year or so ago now had scarcely any demand 
for it. One or two others referred also to the habit of 
methylated-spirit drinking as being indulged in almost as 
commonly as that of ether-tippling. The general result of the 
evidence contained in these letters was to the effect that 
the practice of ether-drinking certainly did exist in parts of 
the country, but that it did not prevail to such an alarming 
extent as some of the statements made by former witnesses 
had seemed to indicate. 

The Chairman : You are aware, I expect, that ether has 
lately been scheduled as a poison under the provisions of 
the Food and Drugs Act {sic), and that its sale must conse- 
quently now be attended with considerably greater diffi- 
culties than formerly 1 — Yes ; I am aware that that step has 
been taken, and consider that it is decidedly a right and 
proper course to take. 

Dr. Lauder Brunton was then examined as to the ageing 
of spirits. He said that the evidence now available regard- 
ing the nature of the impurities of spirit, and the action of 
these substances on the human body, aod the power of 
ageing to modify that action, was at present too small to 
render advisable at the present time any measure which 
would interfere with commerce to such an extent as com- 
pulsory bonding for a year would. 

The Chairman : Do you know in what way a man drunk 
with ethylic alcohol would fall ?— He might fall in any 
position, depending upon the nature of the road on which 
he was walking. 

The Chairman : Is it not the experience of mankind, as 
recorded in the Bible and elsewhere, that old wine is better 
than new ?— It is noted in the Acts of the Apostles that men 
were said to have had too much new wine, indicating 
that the new wine seemed to have a more exciting action 
than the old. 

The Chairman : So that the experience of ages is that old 
and mellowed drinks are better than new ones ? — Yes. 

Inspector Clarke, of the Board of Inland Revenue, also 
gave evidence upon ether-drinking. He had recently spent 
three months in Ireland, making investigations, under in- 
structions from the Inland Revenue authorities, in regard to 
the consumption of ether in the form of a beverage. His 
inquiries had been made at Cookstown, at Draperstown, and 
in the neighbourhood of other towns where the practice was 



562 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



alleged to prevail. He had interviewed clergymen of all 
denominations, poor-law clerks, members of the Royal Irish 
Constabulary, grocers, chemists, and others likely to possess 
information on the matter. As the result of these inquiries 
he and his colleagues came to the conclusion that ether- 
drinking had decidedly increased in the districts named 
during the last two jears, but that since ether had been 
scheduled as a poison, in the early part of the present year, 
the practice hard largely diminished. All did not agree 
with this view of the question, however, the Rector of 
Cookstown, among others, holding that little effect had been 
produced by this step. The practice was not a new one in 
any way. Twenty or thirty years ago it was a common thing 
to see the ether-bottle, the whisky-bottle, and the brandy- 
bottle standing on the counter together. Most of the persons 
whom he had interviewed had seemed to think that the 
scheduling of ether as a poison would be effectual in 
diminishing its consumption as a beverage. As to the alleged 
-consumption of methylated spirits in the same way, he had 
found no cases of the kind in the ether-drinking districts, 
though in other parts of the country — in what was known as 
the Braids district, for instance — he found that the practice 
was very prevalent. The register kept by the Inland Revenue 
officer at Ballymena for last year showed that no less than 
714 gallons of this spirit had been received during last year 
by the local chemist. Of that quantity it would be impos- 
sible to say how much was used for what might be called 
legitimate purposes ; but there were no manufactures in the 
town where it could be used, and the number of private 
houses in the town in which it would be likely to be used 
for lighting purposes was very limited. Small farmers and 
their servants and members of the artisan classes seemed 
to be those chiefly addicted to the practice. Methylated 
spirit was extremely nauseous, even when liberally diluted 
with water. It was preferred to whisky by those who took 
it mainly because it produced intoxication more rapidly, and 
also because the effects passed off more quickly. The Board 
of Inland Revenue was now considering what steps should 
be taken in order to secure that those who defrauded the 
revenue by selling methylated spirits for potable purposes 
should be punished, and to prevent, as far as possible, its 
use in this manner altogether. In the district where 
methylated spirit was consumed in this way ether-drinking 
was unknown. 

The chairman announced that the Committee's report 
would be presented in a few days. 



Inflammable Liquids Bill. 
The fate of this Bill was decided in the House of Com- 
mons on Tuesday. When the order for its second reading 
was reached the Home Secretary withdrew the measure un- 
conditionally. Simultaneously a blue-book on the Bill has 
been_ published, in which are detailed the history of the 
existing Acts, and the effect which they have upon trade. 
The part of the '• memorandum " which is of most interest at 
present is that which deals with the reasons for and data 
upon which the Bill withdrawn on Tuesday was based. It 
appears from this that since 1875 inquiries have been in 
progress, both at home and abroad, the object being to 
obtain such data as would furnish sound principles for 
legislation. Apart from these inquiries, representations by 
the trades concerned, a number of serious accidents, and an 
independent examination of the defects of the existing 
law have all had a determining influence. The inquiries 
were made by Colonel Majendie, Chief Inspector of Ex- 
plosives, and Mr. Boverton Redwood, of the Petroleum 
Association, who made 192 visits of inspection to towns and 
cities at home, and 50 to 81 oE the principal continental 
ports and cities. At home they visited various paraffin 
factories, such works as Price's Patent Candle Company 
(Limited) ; oilman's shops ; varnish factories, such as Colt- 
hurst & Hardings ; wholesale and retail druggists, amongst 
those being Myers i: Saunders, Hull ; J. Brooks, Shude Hill, 
Manchester ; J. and J. Haslett and Dobbin & Co. (Limited"). 
Belfast; Mc Master, Hodgson Sc Co.; H. Moore & Co., and 
others in Dublin ; W. and IT. Goulding & Co., of Cork, &c. 
By 1884 a draft Bill was in preparation, and two years 
later Colonel Majendie and Mr. Redwood extended their 
inquiry to Canada and the United States. In the course of 
the inquiry in foreign parts it was found that the regulations 



in various countries are far more rigorous than in the United 
Kingdom. Thus under the Bill now withdrawn 100 gallons 
was the maximum allowed to be stored in barrels in premises 
under registration, or 250 gallons in metal tank depots. 
Belgium alone approaches at all near this, allowing 
80 gallons in barrel, and in the United States only 1 barrel 
(= 40 gallons) is allowed in the chief cities. In no Con- 
tinental country is a quantity exceeding 60 gallons allowed 
to be kept in barrel, and generally the regulations are 
stringent as to storage in metallic vessels. There was con- 
siderable difference of opinion as to storage quantity in the 
committee which was called into existence at the 
end of 1887 mainly on the representation of the 
Petroleum Association, and before which an abstract 
draft of the Bill by Mr. Albert Gray was submitted. 
A conference was subsequen ly held with represen- 
tatives of a variety of the trades who use or produce 
naphtha or other mineral spirit. Some of their objections 
were met, but the fate of the Bill of this year shows that all 
opposition was not smothered. The whole history of 
petroleum legislation indicates that we shall yet hear more 
of the Bill ; and, in view of its reappearance, those directly 
interested would do well to study " Colonel Majendie's Memo- 
randum," which can be obtained from the Government pub- 
lishers for a shilling. 



personalities. 



Mr. J. R. Philpotts, chemist, Newnham-on-Severn, ha 8 
been returned at the head of the poll for the Local Board of 
that district. 

Mr. Insull, chemist and druggist, of Hanley, has been 
re-elected (for the eighth time) churchwarden of St. Luke's 
Church. 

Mr. Major Hill, late managing assistant with Mr. 
Thomas Sellais, Coventry, has commenced busines at 52 Nor- 
folk Street East, Wisbech. 

Sir Douglas Maclagan, M.D., visitor to the Scotch 
Board of Examiners, is to receive the honorary degree LL.D. 
from the Glasgow University next week. 

Mr. J. T. Smith, chemist and druggist, of Radcliffe, 
Lancashire, has been elected for the third time on the Local 
Board of that town. This time Mr. Smith was at the head 
of the poll. 

Mr. Wilson, chemist, Oxford, was on Easter Tuesday 
elected people's churchwarden (for the third successive 
year) of the parish of St. Thomas ye Martyr, the oldest 
parish church in that city. 

Mr. Robert J. Blackham, L.P.S.I., apothecary to the 
Rotunda Hospitals, Dublin, passed the Second Professional 
Examination of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons and Physi 
cians held last week in Edinburgh. 

Messrs. Vogt & Co., of 27 and 28 Jewry Street, E.C., an- 
nounce that Mr. G. Herbst, of Calcutta, has joined their 
firm, which will be carried on in future under the style of 
Vogt, Herbst & Co., London, and G. Herbst, Calcutta. Mr. 
A. Wiedemann will sign by procuration. 

Mr. Alf. P. Barnard, chemist and dentist, Columbia Road, 
Hackney Road, and Bishop's Road, and at Stamford Hill, 
has been elected, for the tenth time, a Guardian for St. 
Matthews, Bethnal Green. During this long period he has 
either stood top of the poll or second for his ward. 

Mr. Andrew Pears, of the firm of A. k F. Pears, and 
Mr. R. C. Treatt, of Dunster House, E.C., left London on 
Wednesday morning upon a trip to the shores of the Mediter- 
ranean. After a short slay in Paris they will proceed to 
Grasse, thence to various places in Algeria and Tunis, and 
return by way of Malta, Sicily, and the Italian mainland. 
Mr. Pears makes the journey principally to reoruit his health, 
while Mr. Treatt, who knows the south of Europe well, and 
possesses considerable linguistic accomplishments, will com- 
bine pleasure with basiness, and pay visits to the principal 
essential- oil centres on his route. The trip is expected to 
occupy about four weeks. 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



663 



Chemists should note the offer of free samples of Caffyn's 
liquor carnis and preparations for themselves or medical men, 
made this week by the company. 

A pbbtty transparency, produced at the London Sand- 
blast Works, advertising Sainsbury's lavender water, is 
offered by the maker, 176 and 177 Strand, to any chemist 
who will exhibit it. 

In one of Messrs. Armbrecht, Nelson & Co.'s pages this 
week there is a new illustration of their premises, which is a 
set off to a brief conversation between two sweeps who figure 
in the scene, one of whom has tender recollections of 
Armbrecht's " Happy Medium." 

Mr. Martindale is offering dried moss compressed into 
sheets. This substance is now much used as an absorbent 
material in hospitals. It absorbs eight times its weight of 
water and is very light, so that it makes an excellent dressing, 
while there are other purposes to which it can be put in the 
sick-room. 

Messrs. Jewsbtjry Sc Brown, of Manchester, have had 
their aerated beverages exhaustively analysed by Mr. Watson 
Smith, F.I.C., &c, late lecturer on Chemical Technology in 
Owens College, and his report, which is of the most satis- 
factory character, is now printed in a circular, for distribu- 
tion by retailers along with a price-list. 

Cork extractor. — The latest useful invention, for which 
Messrs. Fordham & Sons (Limited) have taken the agency, 
is an instrument patented by Mr. T. A, McKee, B A., of 




We3ley College, Dublin, " for removing corks and portions 
of cork from the interior of bottles and other necked vessels." 
The instrument is in the form of a long corkscrew, but con- 
sists of a bundle of wires held together by a brass ring, but 
which, when inserted into a bottle, expand and grip the cork, 
and draw it out quite easily. 

Clinical Thermometers. — As showing how accurate 
clinical thermometers are made nowadays, we have before 
us a dozen Kew certificates for clinical maximum ther- 
mometers made by Messrs. Perken, Son, & Rayment, and 
tested at the Observatory. Seven of them have the correc- 
tion marked at 0 0° for all temperatures, two have three of 
the temperatures 0 0°, and one has 95°+ 01°, the other being 
+ 0'1° at 105° ; the tenth thermometer requires a correction 
of + 01° at 105° and 110°, the eleventh a similar correction 
at three divisions, and the twelfth, + 0 2°. at all divisions. 
It mu.-t be a great comfort to physicians to have instruments 
of this accuracy and with such a guarantee. 



SOME FACTS REGARDING DIABETES. 



DR. A. E. WRIGHT recently delivered, in the theatre of 
the London University, a lecture on " Some Points con- 
nected with the Pathology and Treatment of Diabetes." 
Dr. Wright was formerly a Grocers' Research Scholar, and 
while he held the scholarship made a special study of 
diabetes. This malady is one which continues to receive 
great attention from physicians, yet it is apparently not on 
the decline. There is a correspondingly greater interest 
manifested by many persons unconnected with medicine, 
as many of our subscribers are doubtless aware, so that 
a few of the principal points of Dr. Wright's lecture will 
D e of interest to chemists and druggists. One of the chief 
c haracteristics of diabetes is the loss of power to assimilate 
saccharides, and the consequent danger of poisoning by the 



accumulation of these bodies in the system. This applies 
particularly to dextrose, as levulose is assimilated by dia- 
betic patients. It is not always wise to rigidly exclude 
sugars from their diet — Indeed, the ideal diet would be one of 
proteids and fats, to which the innocuous lajvo-rotatory 
carbohydrates had been added in such quantities as were 
available, or in default of these the "assimilable quantum " 
of dextro-rotatory carbohydrates, at least, whenever the bad 
results of a proteid diet weTe manifesting themselves. Of 
the assimilable carbohydrates inulin is the most important. 
Inulin is a homologue of starch, with the important differ- 
ence that, instead of yielding dextro-rotatory simple sugars, 
as starch does, it yields only hevo- rotatory simple sugars. 
It occurs abundantly in dahlia tubers, in dandelion, chicory, 
and other roots, and, as Kiilz pointed out years ago, it can 
be baked into a good bread. Against it there is chiefly its 
price, some 15s. per lb. ; but there is no reason why it 
should not be produced at a comparatively moderate price. 
When the fact becomes widely known that there would be a 
large demand for it if it were cheaper, the first step will 
have been taken towards its being produced for the market. 
At present an innocuous — that is, entirely assimilable — 
sugar for dietetic purposes remains as yet an unrealised 
desideratum. 

We may, however, possibly have an approach to such a 
food-stuff in the Jerusalem artichoke, the carbohydrates of 
which, according to Tollens, are levulin and inulin during 
the spring and summer, while dextro-rotatory carbohydrates 
make their appearance in the tubers only in the autumn. 
Now, as artichokes are stated to come into season in June, 
it is possible that during a few months of the year Jeru- 
salem artichokes may contain only assimilable carbo- 
hydrates. Various considerations also point to the fact 
that we may allow fruit, more freely than starch food, in 
the diabetic diet, as fruit contains a proportionately larger 
amount of assimilable matter. 

As to the assimilation of milk-sugar experience has not 
yet shown that it is innocuous ; hence, milk is often pro- 
scribed for diabetics. It is a great pity, considering its 
value, that this should be so merely because of the presence 
of the milk-sugar, and by putting together a few facts that 
have been loDg known about milk, Dr. Miller has been able 
to separate the proteid and fat of the milk from the sugar — 
in a word to precipitate the casein and fat of the milk, to- 
filter them off, allowing all the sugar to run away from them, 
and then to redissolve the washed precipitate in a solution 
of the normal salts of milk, to which a little alkali had been 
added. The process is a very simple one. Take a quantity 
of milk, dilute it with three or four volumes of water, to 
which 1 to 2 parts per 1,000 of acetic acid have been added 
(51SS. to 5iij. of acid. acet. fort, of the B.P. to Oj. of water). 
Tnis produces a precipitation of all the casein and fat of the 
milk. The precipitate is allowed to settle for a few minutes, 
and is then strained through a piece of calico. The precipi- 
tate is then washed, and redissolved in a 1-per-cent. solution 
of the following mixture of salts : — 

Parts. 

Sodium chloride H'5 

Potassium ohloride 9'9 

Monopotassium phosphate 13 8 

Dipotasflum phosphate 10 0 

Citrate of potassium 5'9 

Dimagnesium phosphate 4"0 

Magnesium citrate 4"4 

Dlcalcium phosphate 8~Q 

Tricnlcium phosphate .. .. .. 9 6 

Calcium citrate 25'5 

Calcium oxide 5 - 5 

Sodium carbonate 40 0 

A trace of saccharin may be used to sweeten the milk. 
The salt solution is best used at about blood temperature, 
and the casein and fat precipitate is to be mixed up with it, 
as in making cocoa, to the desired thickness. We obtain 
by this easy method a very fairly palatable and entirely 
sugarless milk. The precipitated casein and fat can also be 
dried without undergoing alteration, and then used for the 
preparation of the milk. 

The indications in the occurrence of which it may be 
desirable to allow sugar in diabetes are the appearance in 
large quantities in tho urine of the morbid products of pro- 
teid metabolism. Among such products are acetone, acetic 



564 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



[April 18, 1891. 



acid and oxybutyric acid. Simultaneously with them there 
is a large increase in the amount of eioreted nitrogen, as a 
long series of analyses shows. Where this happens we are 
bound to decrease the amount of nitrogenous diet, using 
instead more fat and carbohydrates. 

The administration of alkalies in diabetes is undoubtedly 
incorrect, but there are cases occasionally in which they do 
good. In a case cited by the lecturer, where the patient was 
simply treated by a certain restriction of diet, and by the 
administration of citrate of potash, there was a large 
amount of pre-formed ammonia in the urine. The amount in 
the twenty-hour hours was more than six times as great as the 
normal average daily quantity, which ranges somewhere 
about 0 75 gramme. The urine was only slightly acid, this 
being no index to the real acidity, as there is also " latent 
acidity " — that is to say, the surplus of acid over fixed bases 
in the urine is, as the beautiful investigations of Hallervor- 
den have shown, always neutralised in the human or carni- 
vorous organism by ammonia before it is excreted. Thus, 
the amount of pre-formed ammonia comes to be the index 
of the latent acidity of the urne. In this patient's case 
the amount was 4 58 grains per diem, and under the treat- 
ment mentioned it decreased in a fortnight to normal. This 
case shows as well as anything could how important it is 
for the physician to make a precise chemical study of the 
condition of his patient, and to adapt his treatment thereto. 
Obviously in this the pharmacist can be of great assistance 
to him, hence the importance of practice in urine-analysis, 
which we have so frequently advised. In the course of his 
lecture Dr. Miller also referred to the discovery of the 
phenomena of phloridzin or, more correctly speaking, of 
phloretin diabetes, which is due to Professor von Mering, 
of Strasburg. He was investigating the effects of 
certain glucosides on the storage of glycogen in the liver, 
when, in the course of his experiments with the glucoside 
phloridzin, which is obtained from the bark of many of our 
common fruit-tree 3 , he came upon the remarkable fact that the 
phloridzin had made his animals glycosuric. The glycosuria 
is not due to a mere splitting off of the sugar contained in 
the phloridzin, because it can be obtained equally well when 
phloretin — that is, the residue of the phloridzin, after the 
sugar has been split off — is administered. The glycosuria 
from phloridzin can be produced in dogs and cats and 
rabbits, and also in man. In connection with this fact, it is 
interesting to note that in some of our popular handbooks 
of materia medica phloridzin is described as " a good bitter 
aromatic tonic," and is directed to be prescribed in doses of 
from 5 to 15 grains. With this last dose, twice daily, Von 
Mering obtained as much as 6 lbs. of sugar in the course of 
a month from "a patient." With phloretin the diabetes 
occurs in dogs and cats, but Dr. Miller has failed to produce 
it in rabbits. In regard to the quantity of sugar excreted, 
he obtained as much as 42 grammes — that is, more than 
1 cz. and a third— in a dog's urine for a single day. The 
animals get apparently perfectly well when the administra- 
tion of the drug comes to an end, and even while the sugar 
excretion is taking place the animals cannot be distinguished 
from normal ones. The whole study of this "artificial" 
diabetes is of great interest, and those who wish to follow 
it up more closely should refer to the British Medical 
Journal of April 11, from which we take these notes. 



MARRIAGES. 
[Notices of Marriages and Deaths are inserted free if sent 
with proper. authentication.'] 
Sgent — Cummin gs. — On March 26, at St. James' 
frch, Bermondsey, William Thomas Sergent, pharmaceu- 
1 chemist, Croydon, to Alice, youngest daughter of J. 
timings, Esq., of Bermondsey. 

Pood— Mallett.— On April 18, by the Rev. William 
nrchell, at Wing, John Wood, chemist, Aylesbury, to Eliza- 
eth Ann Mallett, of Wing. 



Lanoline. — In an Italian official report the curious 
nistake is made that one of the tests for lanoline is that it 
Ishonld not lose more than 80 per cent, when heattd to 
f 100° C. ; 20 per cent, is more like the thing. 



DEEDS OF ARRANGEMENT. 



Th« following deed of arrangement w 1th creditor! has beea filed at the 
Bills of Bale Office, under the provisions of the Deeda of Arraagemeut 
Aot, 1887. Borne of these deeds are for the purpose of carrying out 
compositions with creditors (and such are specified below), bat the 
great majority of them are "assignments" in the ordinary form, to a 
trustee or trustees, for the benefit of creditors. The Aot referred to 
expressly provides that registration shall not give validity to any deed 
w aloh is aa aot of bankruptcy, and there is no provision, in the Act, 
making any of these arraagements bladlig upon dissenting creditors. 



Hart, H. B.& E.L., 9 Mincing Lwe.E.C., colonial brokers and commission 
merchants (partner*, Henry Barnett Hart and Ernest Lacon Hart, 
bsth of " Woodburn, Fairholt Road, Stamford Hill, trading as). 
Date, April 4 ; filed, April 11. Unsecured Uabilltlea, 11,249/. 15>. lid. 
Composition of 5j. Id. in the £, payable— 4». with seven days of regis- 
tration hereof, and Is. Id. on or before May 1. The following are 
scheduled as creditors : — 

Anderson, Weber & Bmlth, London 

Brown & limslie „ 

Bachler, H. „ 

Figgis, 8. & Co. „ 
Gray, E. D. <fc t!o. ) 

Gray, Nephew 4: Co. j " 

Johnson, Rolls &Co. „ 

Marshall & French „ 

May, Malcolm Si Co. ., 

Petrocochlno Bros. „ 

Titt, Squire J. „ 

Ralll Bros. „ 

Seton, Laing & Co. „ 
Thew & Btiebel, Manchester 
Vale, King & Co., London 



£ 8. 


<f. 


32 13 


10 


27 17 


0 


108 13 


0 


900 0 


0 


249 0 


0 


3,663 0 


0 


690 0 


0 


2,613 0 


0 


ioO 0 


0 


71 12 


1 


1,700 0 


0 


591 0 


0 


250 0 


0 


103 0 


0 



NEW COMPANIES. 



Johnson, Matthey & Co. (Limited).— Capital, 900,000/., 
in 151. shares. Objecs : to acquire and carry on as a going 
concern the business now carried on under the style of 
Johnson, Matthey & Co., and to carry on the business of 
assayers, refiners and metallurgical chemists, and dealers in 
gold, platinum, silver, and chemicals, &c. The first sub- 
scribers (who take an ordinary share each) are :— George 
Matthey, Hatton Garden ; G. S. Sellon, Edward Matthey, 
R. S. Matthey, J. S. Pybus-Sellon, C. G. R. Matthey. 
P. St. Clair Matthey, R. S. SelloD, all of Hatton Garden. 
The above-named gentlemen, with the exception of the last- 
named, also act as directors. Qualification, 15,000/. ; 
Registered office, 78 Hatton. Garden, London. 

London Phosphate Syndicate (Limited), with a 
capital of 60.0C0Z , in 100/. shares, to work guano-phosphates, 
&c, from the Island of Redonda, and to carry on the trades 
of chemical manufacturers, chemical refiners, &c. The first 
subscribers (who take one share each) are : — W. T. Deeley, 
Chester, manufacturer ; John Abbott, Leicester Gate, chemi- 
cal manufacturer ; J. Forbes, Fenchurch Street, chemical 
manufacturer; F. Lennard, Fenchurch Street, chemical 
manufacturer ; F. Ince, Fenchurch Street, solicitor ; G. C. 
Parnaby, Lewisham, cashier; F. A. Deeley, Leadenhall 
Street, agent for the Dee Oil Company (Limited). The first 
directors are Messrs. W. C. Deeley, J. Thompson, W. S. 
Barrett, J. Forbes, J. Abbott, and F. Lennard. Registered 
office, 165 Fenchurch Street, London. 

The Palatine Colour Company (Limited), with a 
capital of 10,000/., in 10/. shares, to acquire licences to work 
and use the inventions of C. A. Burghardt, Manchester, 
analytical chemist, for improvements in the production of 
nitrate of ammonia, and carry into effect an agreement, 
dated April 7, 1891, between C. A. Burghardt of the one 
part, and R. Marriott of the other part. The first subscri- 
bers, who take one share each, .are: — T, J. Hutchinson, 
Bury, analytical, &c , chemist ; S. Pearn, West Gorton, 
engineer; F. Pender, Manchester, corn-miller; W. Davison, 
Manchester, colour manufacturer; G.Milne, 4 Chapel Walks, 
Manchester, chartered accountant; G. Forsyth, Salford, 
corn-miller; G. B. Norton, Corporation Street, Manchester, 
merchant. The first directors are Messrs. T. J. Hutchinson, 
J. Newsome, and J. Leigh, qualified without holding shares. 
The future qualification is 100/. Remuneration to be voted 
at the general meeting. 



April 18, 1891.] ' 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



565 



^radical fUt.es anb &axmrxh% 



Perfume for Pomade. 

The perfume required for the la3t-mentioned formula is 
composed of the following : — 

English essence o( raspberry 20 minims 

OH of cinnamon 7 „ 

Oil of cltronella 8 „ 

Oil of rose-geranium 5 „ 

Oil of bergamot 6 „ 

Peruvian balsam 5 » 

ttttX. 

Gum foam Mixture for Soda-water Syrups. 

The following, according to Mr. E. V. Zoeller, of Tabora, 
Nor. Car., will keep indefinitely. Two to four fluid ounces 
to a gallon of syrup serves the purpose. 

Place 1 lb. of gum acacia in a 4-pint wide-month bottle ; rinse the 
gum two or three times by shaking with about 32 oz. of water each time 
and pouring away ; then add 32 oz. of water. 

Stir with a sufficiently long handled wooden paddle until dissolved, then 
add— 

Benzoic acid 40 grains 

Dissolved in 

Rectified spuit 2 fl. drachms 

Mixed with 

Tincture of qnillaia 6 fl. oz. 

Finally mix and strain. 

White Finish for Shoes. 

Best white glue lib. 

Sulphate of zinc 1J ., 

Sulphate of copper .. .. .. .. 2 ,, 

Boltei pipeclay 1 ,, 

Sulphate of magnesia 1 ,, 

Light yellow oenre 2 oz. 

Water 4 gal'. 

Mix and let stand until all is dissolved, then bripg to the boiling point 
and add 2 lb*, oxalic acid and tragaoauth q.s. Iron or gum brush in tbe 
usual way, and w~x. If this is properly used, tbe red colour will not 
work through. 

Sc. American. 

Menthol Solution for Pains. 

A correspondent of the Eclectic MedicalJi'ur nal recom- 
mends the following as a very effective remedy for toothache, 
frontal headache, and any violent pain due to irritation of 
nerve-centres, or branches of the same. In severe frontal pain 
of a catarrhal orityin, the open bottle of this solution held 
close to the nostrils, so that the fumes can be inhaled, will 
rarely fail to give relief : — 

Menthol crystals 1 drachm 

• — ,, cinnamon 20 minims 

Oil of cloves _ 20 „ 

Rectified spirit 4 drachms 

Dissolve. 

How to Make a Gutta-percha Stopping. 

Dr. Merit Wells, an Indianapolis dentist, states that 
the first thing to do is to see that the cavity has been 
properly prepared, protected and dried. Then take a piece 
T>f gutta-percha a little larger than will be required to fill the 
cavity. Warm gradually and shape it into a pellet or bean 
shape, being careful not to burn the gum. Use dry heat 
^on a heated slab or by passing rapidly back and forward 
through the flame of a lamp). When tho gutta-percha is 
pliable, take a smooth spatula or blunt instrument and 
press the mass into the cavity till it is full. If the 
gutta-percha seems to be unyielding before the cavity is 
toll, heat the instrument s'ightly and apply till the gutta- 
percha becomes pliable. When the cavity is full allow the 
rilling to cool, then heat the instrument and press near the 
centre of the filling. Press the instrument away from the 
centre down to the surface of the opening and off, carrying 
away the surplus. Then allow the gutta-percha to cool, 
and again heat the instrument and press in the opposite 
side of the cavity similarly. Cool again, and thus treat the 
whole surface of the filling. Avoid pressing backward and 



forward, as thus you get the filling to playing or rocking 
in the cavity. In case the nerve is exposed or nearly bo, 
shape enough material to fill the whole cavity in such a' 
way that a rounded, smooth point may be brought in con- 
tact with the exposed nerve or sensitive point. The cavity 
being all ready (dry, &c), heat the point of gutta-percha 
which is intended to touch the nerve or sensitive point till" 
it is pliable, then press the surface against a smooth 
instrument, making the gutta-percha smooth and cool at 
the same time. Press the gutta-percha to place quickly and 
gently till the bottom is reached, leaving no apace ; rest till 
the material has cooled, then proceed to fill as described 
before, being careful to keep the gutta-percha as cool as 
possible to work, as the heat is liable to cause pain and 
inflammation in the pulp. When the patient winces at the 
first touch of the gutta-percha at the bottom of the cavity, 
you may know you have touched the nerve, and no more 
pressure should then be applied until the mass cools. 

Artificial Sea-water. 

For. aquaria there is nothing better than this (except the 
natural thing): — 

Chloride of sodium El grammes 

Sulphate of mogue-ium 7 „ 

Ctiloride of magnesium 10 „ 

< 1 iloride of potassium 2 ,, 

Water 3 to 4 litres 

Glycerine Jellies for the Hands. 
(1) 

Tragacanth 60 gr. 

Glycerine 2 oz. 

Water .. .. 4 „ 

Ex ract ol rose . . 6 drop3 

(2) 

Gelatine 2 dr. 

Glucose 1 oz. 

Glyceriue 6 ,, 

Wat r 3 ., 

Oil of rose 5 drops 

Clarifying Liquids. 

Writing on the various means for clarifying the liquids 
most handled by pharmacists, the Pacific JDrvg Beview 
states that one of the best clarifjiDg agents is albumen, 
which, on heating in the liquid, is formed into flakes that 
carry down any solid matter which may be in the liquid. 
"Vegetable extracts frequently contain, especially if they are 
extracted cold, enough albumen to effect clarification when 
gently heated. Egg-albumen dissolved in a small quantity 
of cold water may be used in the proportion of 1 oz. 
to 2 gallops of liquid extract. The two are mixed 
together and heated until coagulation occurs, then it is 
filtered. The process is facilitated, and the effect of the 
albumen increased, by adding a small quantity of pure 
kaolin liquor. Pulp made of filter-paper may be used instead 
of the kaolin, and for clarifying syrups there is scarcely any 
other substance that acts as well. Some extracts which are 
made from skins, &c. of fruits are liable to contain traces 
of albumen, pectin, &c. These can be removed by adding a 
small quantity of alcohol, just enough to precipitate these 
matters and no more. A small quantity of tannin added to 
extracts prepared from juicy fruits, and which contain 
albumen, gelatine, gum, or pectin, will precipitate these, 
especially if the extracts be gently heated before adding the 
alcohol. The addition of a little washed barytes or China 
clay will much facilitate the clarif jing process by carrying 
down floating particles. For clarif jing alcoholic liquors the 
following mixture will be found satisfactory : — 

Tarts 

Album"'!), dry 4 

Milk Uigur, dry 4 

Stirch 2 

These are mixed and ground to a fine powder. Seventy- 
five grains of this are sufficient to clear a quaitof liquid. 
It is added, nnd the mixture thoroughly shaken together, 
and then allowed to stand for a day or two, when the mixture 
will be found to have settled to the bottom, carrying with it 
all floating matter. 



566 



THE CHEMIST 



AND 'DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



®rab« JUport. 



JfOttce to Retail Buyers: — It should be renumbered that the quotation! in thU 
section are invariably the lowest net cash prices actually paid/or large 
quantities in bulk. In many cases allowances have to be added be/ore 
ordinary prices can be ascertained. Frequently goods must be picked and 
torltd to suit the demands of the retail trade, causing much labour and 
the accumulation of rejections, not all of which are suitable, even for 
manufacturing purposes. 

It should also be recollected that for many articles the range of quality i s 
very wiile, 

42 Cannon Street, April 16. 

THE drug and chemical trades have been rather quiet this 
week, and prices generally rule in buyers' favour. At 
to-day's drug auctions, which were exceedingly lengthy, a 
decline was established in the following articles : — Ipecacu- 
anha, vanilla, Cape aloes, Chinese cantharides, honey, and 
Sumatra gum benzoin. Cod-liver oil is also lower, and the 
market for rhubarb is decidedly weak. Buchu, gamboge, 
dragon's-blood, and ergot of rye are very steady. Kaw camphor 
is firmly held on the spot, but rather easier for delivery. 
Areca nuts, cardamoms, green strophanthus, nux vomica, and 
beeswax have advanced in price. In chemicals, cream of 
tartar and soda salts are lower, and quinine has again 
broken the record of decline. Refined camphor is very 
firm; citric acid and hypophosphites are dearer. The 
following are the principal changes in outside articles : — 
Higher : sticklac and Kurpah indigo ; steady : tea, soy, and 
cutch ; lower: gambier, indiarubber, Bengal indigo, shellac, 
pimento, and Jamaica ginger. 



A new Musk Substitute. — Another claimant for 
favour as a cheap substitute for musk made its appearance 
in trade some weeks ago. It is manufactured in Germany, 
and appears in the form of a white crystalline powder in 
needle-shaped crystals, a few millimetres in length. It 
is called Tonquinol. It is said to be suited both 
for soap and perfume manufacture, to remain impervious 
to the^nfluence of light foraprolongedperiod, and to be easily 
soluble. An alcoholic solution of 1 in 50 may be diluted 
with water to any extent, and herein it differs from Muse 
Baur. Tonquinol is said to be soluble in most of the usual 
solvents, including fats, oils, ether, and chloroform. Its 
odour is not affected by boiling caustic potash. The price is 
about 25 per cent, lower than that of Muse Baur. 



Gebman Colonial Pboduce.— German explorers and 
publications of the "forward" school are fond of boom- 
ing the German possessions in Africa, and hankering after 
the time, which they believe to be in the near future, 
when the German colonies shall be able to supply the home 
market with tropical produce independently from other 
countries. Most people with any knowledge of colonial 
affairs have always been sceptical about the progress of 
the German colonies, and a letter from Mr. H. F. Kothe, 
formerly administrator of the German " Ost-Afrikanische 
Plantagen Gesellschaft," will go far, if unchallenged, to 
intensify distrust. Mr. Kothe states that in 1887 he was 
sent to German East Africa to report upon the suitability 
of the country for tobacco cultivation. His report was de- 
cidedly unfavourable, and he urged the directors to with- 
draw from East Africa and go to Borneo instead. But he 
was told that this was impossible, as Dr. Peters and others 
had prophesied a splendid future for the country, and it 
would not do to reveal to the people at home that these 
prophecies were based upon ignorance of the true conditions 
of the country. With great difficulty Mr. Kothe finally 
succeeded in producing 300 lbs. of tobacco, which he for- 
warded to the German headquarters at Zanzibar, with the 
special declaration that the tobacco was of the most inferior 
quality. Although this tobacco was harvested by Mr. 
Kothe at Mbuzini, the company's shareholders were led to 
believe that it was grown upon the Lewa plantation, of 
which the brother of one of the directors was the adminis- 
trator. The whole of it was shipped to Berlin, and the 
cigars made of it were much admired as being the produce 
of a " colony of the Fatherland." Mr. Kothe further accuses 



the German East African Company of deliberately misleading 
the Gerjnan people about the value of its possessions in 
Usagara, Usambura, Usegua, ic. As a proof of this, he 
states that Dr. Peters at one Of his meetings stated that he 
had brought to Germany the first batch of 42 lbs. of vanilla 
grown in " our new German colonies." The father superior 
of a French mission on the east coast told Mr. Kothe that 
Dr. Peters had personally purchased this vanilla from him ; 
while Mr. Kothe, who has visited most of the German 
stations in East Africa, declares that he has seen no vanilla 
anywhere. 



The Fbbnch Tabiff on Chemicals. — Tbe Paris 
Chamber of Commerce has submitted to the French Legis- 
lature its report on the modifications which it considers 
desirable in the new customs tariff. So far as chemicals are 
concerned, the chamber is generally in favour of a reduction 
of tbe present duties. It is pointed out that whereas fifteen 
years ago France imported 12,000 tons of soda a year, 
while now her industry has grown so la'ge that she 
actually exports over 20,000 tons annually. The chamber, 
therefore, suggests that the following duties will be suffici- 
ently high : Caustic soda, 4f. per 100 kilos., or 10 per cent. 
ad val. ; carbonate of soda, 2f. per 100 kilos., or 10 per cent. 
ad val. ; chloride of lime, 30f. or 12 per cent, ad val. 
With respect to fine chemicals the chamber supports the 
continuation of the present tariff for all but the following: 
Bromine to be placed on the free list (present duty If. per 
kilo.); all bromides to be taxed 5 per cent, ad val., or 25f . 
per 100 kilos. The tax on iodine, now 4f. per kilo., or about 
20 per cent, ad val., to be maintained in tbe interests of the 
kelp industry, but that on all iodides (now about 5 per cent. 
ad val.) to be raised to 4f. per kilo, or about 20 per cent., 
thus placing the manufactured product on a level with the 
raw. The late commercial war with Italy led to the placing 
of a heavy duty on concentrated lemon and bergamot juices, 
which the report wishes to abolish entirely. It would also 
free citrate of lime, and reduce the duty on crystallised 
citric acid from 50f. to 25f., or about 5 per cent. The report 
further asks that citrates may be made dutiable at 50f. per 
100 kilos., instead of ad valorem as at present. The oxalic 
acid manufacture is so strong and well organised in France 
that it is considered safe to place it on the free list or at 
any rate to reduce the duty to 5 per cent. 



The Pboposed Fbench Customs Tabiff. — In the bil) 
now before the French Legislature the average increase of 
the customs duties on imports is equal to 24 per cent. The 
steady decline of French trade since 1881, when the Protec- 
tionist regime began to prevail, is shown in the following 
table : — 



Tear. 


Millions of Francs. 


Total trade. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


I860 


4,147 






1882 


8.396 . 


4,822 


3.574 


1884 


7.576 


7,'44 


3,233 


1886 


7.456 


4.201 


3,249 


1F>8 


7.373 


4.107 


3.247 


mo 


8,143 


4,143 


3,720 



British imports into France have fallen from 28,104,000/. in 
1881 to 21,532,0002. in 1890, while the French exports to the 
United Kingdom have risen during the same period from 
35,912,0002. to 39,976,0002. 



The Commercial Pbogbess of [Pebsia.— During the 
last three or four years our produce markets have more than 
once afforded evidence of the increasing development of 
tbe economic resources of Persia, especially of the rich 
western and north-western provinces of that country. 
Since the conditional opening of the Karun river to European 
trade several varieties of produce have been consigned direct 
from the Persian Gulf to London, which formerly were either 
not met with at all or reached us by a roundabout way and 
in a more advanced condition of sophistication than we now 



April 18. 1891.] 



5G7 



receive them. 80 far as the dm ; trade is I 1 
instances of the growing importance of the Pers 
are found in the consignments of u lusually fine asafcetida, 



which have been received here from 1 
sian Gulf and in the small shipment 
shells to which we referred recently. 

of commercial progress in Eastern oinPtrieaj we may expect 
ere long to receive on our markets a mucn IBT7BI slime 



undei^Abbas on the Per- 
of • kernels in 

Ho wing for the slowness 



TafglH sliaie ul' 

the gums, fruits, minerals, and other products in whioh the 
dominions of the Shah are known to abound than has hitherto 
reached us. 



The Direct Consignments of Java Cinchona.— The 
contracts existing between at least one firm of German 
quinine makers and certain Java planters for the direct 
supply of bark have been often alluded to as one of the 
causes of the depression in quinine. In connection with 
these contracts, it is of some interest that the output of the 
two estates, "Soekawana" and "Djajagiri," of which it is 
known that they consign their output in the manner 
described, is believed to be diminishing considerably. The 
Soekawana estate, which produced about 100 tons in 1889 
and 1890, has sent no returns this year ; while the " Djajagiri " 
plantation is estimated to produce only 30 tons this season. 
Both estates yield a bark of considerable average alkaloidal 
richness — viz., from 5| to 6 per cent. The Djajagiri planta- 
tions occupy 167 bouws, the Soekawana, 400 bouws. 



Developing the Zambesi Region. — The British South 
African Company have engaged a practical botanist, who has 
had over twenty years' experience in the cultivation of pro- 
duce in Ceylon, to proceed to their territories in Zambesia 
and superintend the development of their vegetable re- 
sources. The gentleman in question, with whom we had an 
interview a few days ago, leaves early in May for Zanzibar, 
whence he will proceed by way of the Zambesi to his desti- 
nation in the neighbourhood of the Shire Highlands. His 
attentions will be directed not only to the collection and 
export of such native products as are likely to find a market 
in Europe, such as rubber, gums and gum resins, oleaginous 
plants, and so forth, but he will also try the acclimatisation 
of tropical and subtropical products. Coffee is already cul- 
tivated with success in Zambesia ; tea is going to be tried, 
but the company are alive to the danger of over-production 
in this article. Cocoa and tobacco are thought to hold out 
greater hopes of success. As regards drugs, needless to say, 
cinchona will noc be tried. Opium-culture has been ex- 
perimented in before in Mozambique, the result being a 
signal failure. Cardamoms and vanilla are among the first 
drugs to be tried, and the authorities have promised to lend 
every possible assistance in procuring plants and giving 
advice as to cultivation. Now that a trained botanist is 
about to proceed to the country of the strophanthus, we may 
expect the speedy elucidation of the mystery still surround- 
ing the botanical classification of the drug. The first season 
or two, however, are likely to be taken up with preliminary 
investigations of the climatic conditions of the country, 
meteorological observations, Sec. Native labour will be em- 
ployed in the first instance, under the supervision of 
overseers from Zanzibar, Ceylon, and British India. 



The New Russian Customs Tariff. — It is confidently 
stated in Continental commercial circles that a general 
advance of 20 per cent, in the duty on all the chief articles 
of import into Russia will be announced towards the end of 
April, and that the enhanced tariff will come into force on 
May 1, old style. 



The Fobthcoming German Exhibition.— The German 
Exhibition will be opened at Earl's Court in May, and is hoped 
by its promoters to eclipse the American, the Italian, Spanish, 
and French exhibitions which preceded it. That in itself will 
not be a particularly difficult task There will be a Fine Art 
section comprising about 700 paintings, a display of hunting 
trophies, a colossal figure of Germania, a model of the 
Wartburg, the historic castle where Luther was confined, a 
model of the far-famed Heidelberg Tun, and a large variety 
of scenic representations of German cities and landscapes. 



i erl 



ildings of 
.enjjerg will be d 
exquisite view will be pr 
attractions of the western 
Schleswig-llolstein farmhouse 
emperors. 



in, of Potsdam, of Nuremberg, 
pioted on a large scale, and an 
sented of Munich. The chief 
central gardens will be the 
and the gallery of German 



; ml 



Acid (Citric). —A considerable improvement has occurred 
in our market during the last few days, and prices close at 
an advance of about id. per lb. upon our last, report. It is 
doubtful whether anything less than Is. 3d. per lb. would be 
accepted to-day, and Is. 7]d. has been paid on the 6pot. 
For delivery Is. 3d. per lb. is asked. Juice is quoted at 251. 
f.o.b. now. From Sicily we hear that after a period of 
calmness a fresh advance has occurred in the article, and is 
expected to assume larger proportions when the anticipated 
demand for consumption sets in. 

Acid (Taetaric). — The market remains quiet at Is. Z\d. 
to Is. 3d. per lb., according to brand. 

Aconite. — Twenty bags Japanese root of fair quality were 
again shown at to-day's auctions, and are held at 2,5s. per 
cwt., but there were no bids. 

Aloes. — There has been a very active demand for Cape 
aloes privately since our last report, and prices rose consider- 
ably, business having been done early this week at 24s. 6d. 
to 25s. per cwt. for good bright quality. At to-day's 
auctions, however, 80 cases recently imported were shown 
and of these 64 (partly reshipped for New York) sold with a 
reduction of about 2s. Qd. per cwt. upon the highest prices 
privately paid. Good hard bright fetched 22s Qd. to 23s. ; 
fair to good seconds, from 19s. 6d. to 22s. ; and several lots 
of ordinary drossy very common and sticky aloes, from 
14s. 6d. down to 6s. per cwt. Of Curacua aloes the imported 
supply of 195 cases met with good demand, 134 packages 
selling at rather better prices, good bright red liver, at 61s. 
to 68s. ; brown ditto, at from 50s. down to 43s. ; good fair to 
bright in gourds, from 35s. to 41s. ; and ordinary drossy to 
very common, from 14s. down to 3s. per cwt. For 9 cases 
good hard orange Soeotrine aloes an offer of 64s. was refused, 
while a parcel of Zanzibars in tins was fairly well competed 
for and realised 51s. for good hardish red, down to 40s. for 
darker quality. 

Ambergris. — Nothing of first-class quality was offered 
to-day. Three tins bold pieces, rather heavy and un- 
developed, fair flavour, were bought in at 110s. per oz. We 
hear it said that for small lots of very fine quality 180s. per oz. 
has been paid. 

Anise. — No Japanese Star-anise was offered to-day. Of 
Italian anise 4 bags sold without reserve at 20s. per cwt. 
to day. 

Annatto. — The demand for seed which recently showed 
itself seems to have subsided, 104 packages good bright 
Ceylon being bought in to-day at 2\d. per lb. 

Aharoba. — Twenty-four cases of the parcel recently im- 
ported were again shown at auction and bought in at 2s. 3d. ; 
there was no demand on the part of the trade, however. 

AbeoaNut.— For 5 bags good quality the very high price 
of 30s. per cwt. was paid to-day. This drug is exceedingly 
scarce. 

Balsam Copaiba.— Seven casks of the thick dark grey 
West African copaiba, to which we have alluded before, 
were bought in at to-day's auctions. The broker suggested 
3s. per lb. as the price. Two casks very thick cloudy yellow 
Maranham copaiba were bought in at 2s. 6d. per lb. New 
York reports that an arrival of about 200 cases during the 
last week of March has to some extent relieved the press- 
ing requirements of the market. Good Maracaibo balsam 
is quoted at 2s. 4rf. per lb. c.i.f. terms. Maranham at 2s. 3\d. 
c.i.f. 

Balsam Peru. — All the parcels shown at auction to-day 
were imported rid Hamburg, and for this grade of balsam, 
unworked, 5s. 3d. to 5s. 6d. per lb. is asked. 

Balsam Tolu.— For six cases good softish from Savanilla 
no bids were made to-day, and they were bought in at 
Is 5d. por lb. Under date of April 1 Now Vork reports a 
quiet market, while the last arrivals have as yet found no 



568 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, llfel. 



purchasers. The quotations are from 1*. 3&d. ,to Is. 3§d. 
per lb. o.i.f., according to quality. 

Buohu.— The demand is very well maintained, and prices 
keep up fully to the level of last week's private transactions. 
Fourteen bales good green round leaves sold with competi- 
tion at 5d. to 5^1. per lb., one fine lot at 5Jrf. per lb. For 
one bale good long leaves 8\d. per lb. was paid. 

Calumba remains dull of sale, 60 Hags small to bold root 
rather greyish, being bought in at 25*. ; another lot at 22*. 
per cwt., while for anotherparcel of about 50 packages, partly 
very small mixed, with some fair yellow colour, an offer of 
10*. per cwt. was refused. 

Camfitok (Cbtjde). — The market has been rather less 
active this week. In March- April shipment there has been 
some little business (so it is reported) at 137*. 6d. per cwt., 
c.i.f. ; but for April-May it would be possible to buy at 
127s. 6d., c.i.f. On the spot the holders are firm at 170*. per 
cwt., which price checks business; and it is stated that for 
March shipment there are buyers at 150*. c i.f. terms. 

Camphob (Refined). — The English makers have not 
made any alteration in their quotations yet. German is 
exceedingly scarce on the spot, Is. lOd. being the quotation 
in that position ; but for May delivery there are plenty of 
sellers at 1*. 9^d. per lb. net, delivered London. 

F* Cannabis Indica. — Fine quality is wanting in the mar- 
ket, which is well supplied with medium and ordinary 
parcels. For a parcel of 25 packages lair greyish tops, 
rather dusty, Qd. per lb. was refused (the price being 4^. 
per lb ); but another consignment of forty robbiDs, nearly 
all dust, with some seedy greyish tops, sold at 2\d. to 3d. 
per lb. 

Canthabides. — Three casks Russian cantbarides which 
were declared for sale were not offered. Twenty cases 
Chinese flies, on the other hand, were offered without re- 
serve, this affording a good indication to test the actual 
state of the market for this article, prices havirg been quite 
nominal for several weeks, with quotations ranging trom 
1*. 6d. to 3*. per lb. The 20 cases offered to-day sold at 
1*. Id. to 1*. 2d. per lb , and the article has thus fallen back 
almost to the level at which it stood before the recent 
" boom." Twenty cases were imported from Hongkong this 
week. 

Cardamoms. — The supply offered at to day's auctions 
was very small, consisting of barely 40 cases, less than one- 
half of which was sold, with fair competition, at an advance 
of about Id. per lb. for the better grades. Cej Ion- Malabar : 
Fair yellowish round heavy sold at 2s. 2d., small to medium 
brownish at Is. lOd. to Is. lid., medium palish lean long at 
Is. 6d., small brown round Is. 3d., ditto badly clipped and 
partly split at Is., ordinary shelly ditto 9d. per lb. Mysore : 
Medium to bold round yellow 2s. 2d. to 2s. Qd., small size 
Is. 3d. to Is. 9d., medium <to bold brown and speck y Is. 4rf. 
to Is. 6d. per lb. Pale seed realised Is. Id , ordinary wild 
Ceylon pods 9d. per lb. The shipments of cardamoms from 
Ceylon from January 1 to March 16 have been as follows : — 
1891. 71,437 lbs.; 1890, 96,333 lbs. ; 1889, 48,572 lbs.; 1888, 
83,083 lbs. 

Cascaba Sagbada.— The New York maiket has fallen to 
33s. 6d. per cwt. c.i.f. in consequence of the greater pressure 
to sell by holders on the Pacific coast. The Californian 
agent of a prominent New York drug house reports as 
follows, under date, March 16, 1891 :— "If bark is selling in 
Europe at 26s. per cwt. as reported by some papers, it may 
as well lie in warehouse here, at present at least. In regard 
to gathering bark the coming season, I do not think that at 
present prices there will be any cut. First, those who have 
it on their land will charge at least Id. per lb., except when 
they may be clearing the land, and even then they will exact 
a price. Next, it costs l$d. per lb. to peel and cure it well. 
All convenient access has been cut, and it will cost to get it 
out and ship to the seaport at least \d. per lb. This makes 
it stand in 3d. per lb. f.o.b. here, without any profit to the 
dealer, &c. How is it possible that anyone can afford to sell 
at 26s. per cwt. in the European markets without losing 
money on it ? Yakima Bay and Coas Bay County are well 
cut out ; last season (1890) they cut less than one-half of 
the amount gathered during the prior season (1889). The 
same may be said of Humboldt County ; last season's 



cut was but small, and probably not over ten tons. There 
can be no more bark cut upon Government land, as has been 
done heretofore. A large propoition of the bark cut hereto- 
fore has been peeled out of season, that is, after the sap has 
soured. About the Orst of July the sap begins to sour and 
dry up, and the barkj presents a mottled and slimy appear- 
ance. In San Francisco there are tons of such bark which 
is about as tasteless as a maple chip. One party shipped 
recently about twenty-five tons, and the receivers will 
wonder what is the matter with the bark. The proper season 
for peeling is May and June, but not later than the early 
part of July." 

Cascabilla. — In good supply ; about 160 bales being 
offered, of which 50 sold at 31*. to 32s. per cwt. for good 
silvery quill, and from 25s. to 28*. for fair, rather dusty, 
brownish quill. 

Cinchona. — In South American barks there is nothing 
new to report. Of Guayaquil bark, which has been so 
freely pressed upon the market lately, 7 serons only were 
offered to day — fair grey quill, for which <\d. was refused. 
Of 84 packages flat Calisaya baik 9 sold at Is. Qd. to 1*. 5d. 
for good sound bright orange, and from 9d. down to 2d. 
per lb. for damaged. Ten cases good bold cultivated 
Bolivian Calisaya in quills were bought in at lid. per lb. 
The following figures relate to the exports of cinchona from 
Ceylon during the period between January 1 and March 16 : — 
1891, 1,203,257 lbs. ^1890, 1,589,776 lbs. ; 1889, 1,936,512 lbs.; 
1888, 1,733,002 lbs. 

Civet. — Eleven horns bought in at 6s. 6d. per oz. 

Coca leaves. — Seven packages of Ceylon and Java leave?, 
both equally badly harvested, dark mould and dull, offered 
without reserve, no higher bid than \d per lb. being ob- 
tained; this was refused, as it was stated to be insufficient; 
to cover the charges. In New York holders of Huanoco leaves 
(of which an arrival of 5,000 lbs. took place towards the end 
of March) are very firm, and quote 1*. 6%d. per lb. c.i.f. for 
fine dark green. Light green Truxillo (taarano7i) leaves may 
be had at lid per lb. c.i.f. 

Colocvnth. — Thirty- six packages fa ; r grey Turkey apple 
were bought in at Is. to Is 2d. per lb. to-day, and of an - 
other parcel of 25 cases, seedy ana brown fragments, part 
sold at 6d. per lb. 

CONDURANGO. — Twenty-nine bales damaged bark from 
Hamburgh, pale and rather woody, were bought in to-day at 
Id. per lb. 

Cowhage — For 1 case, rather seedy and stony, l\d. 
per oz. was offered, and this bid is to be submitted to the 
owner. 

Cbeam of Tabtab. — Still falling slowly, 95s. being 
to-day's nearest quotation for good white French crystals. 

Cubebs. — The market is still very well supplied, and 
about 85 packages were offeied at to-day "s auctions. Holdeis 
would be prepared to make further concessions, but buyers 
are very chary of laying in stock. For a parcel of 15 bales 
small berries, slightly stalky, of black colour and mace 
odour, from Singapore, 91. 12s. 6d. is offered, but the limit is 
91. 15s. ; for another lot of bolder but more stalky berries, 
91. 15s. was refused. A parcel of very dusty, stalky, bold brown 
berries is held for 102. ; and 2 bags imported rid Amsterdam, 
genuine, but small and partly shrivelled dusty berries, 
rather stalky, sold at 111. per cwt , which must be thought a 
very good price. 

Cumin Seed.— Seventeen bales rather dusty and dark 
Malta, sold at 19*. to 20s. per cwt. 

Cuscus. — Forty bales of this -grass, of fair quality, are 
limited at 20s. per cwt. 

Cutch.— Firmly held. Privateiy, small sales are reported 
of Bull and Eagle brands at 30s. and A C.L. at 28s. At the 
auction on Tuesday 115 boxes were mostly sold at 23s. 9d. to 
28s. 3d. for C.S. flag in block, and from 9*. 6d. down to 
4s. 3d. for common spurious cutch. 

Cottle fish. — Fifteen cases rather yellow small to 
medium, from Australia, realised 2d. to :'.U. per lb., and for 
5 bales fair white, rather broken, from the Canary Isles, 2\<i. 
was also paid. 



April 18. 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



569 



Dragon's-blood. — In rather small supply and firmly held. 
Eight cases fine fiery seedy lump were bought in at 117. per 
cwt., an offer of 10/. 5s. being refused. 

Ergot op Rye. — Good Spanish is reported to be selling 
privately at 1*. 2d. per lb. ; that figure would have beon 
accepted, had there been any bid, f jr 8 case3 offered at 
auction to-day. 

Galls.— China galls are dull at 58*. to 59*. per owt. 
nominally, and Japan galls are quoted at 59*. to 60*. per cwt. 
There is not muoh business doing. For good to fine blue 
Bus3orah galls from 56**. to 59*. per cwt. is quoted. Prices 
for white and green galls are more or less nominal, owing to 
scarcity of supply. 

Gambieb. — The market is lower for delivery, wi»h sales 
this week of April- June and May- June at 22*. 6d. and 
22*. l\d., c i.f. terms respectively. 

Gamboge. — -Twelve cases were offered for sale at to-day's 
auctions. Holders are firm, and very little business was 
done. Fine bright orange pipe, partly blocky, is held for 
13/. ; rather damp mixed and blocky at 121. per cwt. Four 
cases sold at 111. 15s. to 12/. for fair colour, partly ricey and 
lumpy pipe. 

Gentian Root. — Two bales rather lean, chumpy and dry 
root sold to-day at 15*. per cwt. 

Glycerine. — Some of the German manufacturers have 
reduced their prices recently. The B 8 brand, for 
instance, is now quoted at 56*. per cwt. for double-distilled 
s g. 1260, by the makers. It is, nevertheless, stated that 
the consumption remains good. We believe that the con- 
tinued lowering of the prices is, to some extent, accounted 
for by recent improvements in the process of manufacture. 

Gum Ammoniactjm. — This gum has been so scarce for a 
long time, especially in finer qualities, that seven packages 
just imported from Bombay, and showing partly a very fine 
gum, excited a considerable amount of curiosity. For very 
fine pale clean gum, in loose drops, bidding began at 70s., 
and advanced to 102*. 6d. ; but that lot was bought in at 
120* , which is said to be the limit, while for a somewhat 
less clein parcel 110*. is asked; yellow drop, mixed with 
blocky siftings, is held for 80*., but there was no bid for this 
lot, the limits being considered rather too high. 

Gum Ababic. — Business in East Indian gums is dull, and 
very few transactions of any importance have transpired 
although some Ghatti gum has changed hands, we hear, at full 
prices. For fine pale glassy Kurrachee gum, 92* 6d. per cwt. 
was refused to-day. A parcel of fine white but somewhat 
•dusty Mogadore was bought in at 11/. per cwt. to-day, and 
it was stated that the price was being paid privately. Some 
small orange mixed siftings of a Gehzirah character from 
Saakin were bought in at 29*. per cwt. to day, and ordinary, 
reddish glassy Cape gum, rather blocky, realised from l?.v. 
to 16*. 6d. per cwt. The imports of gums of all varieties 
into Trieste in 1889 amounted to 1 491 tons, worth 335,459/. ; 
the exports, to 1,316 tons, of the value of 338,510/. 

Gdm Asafostida. — Twenty-eight cases from Bombay, 
stony and ordinary, were bought in at from 40*. to 45s. 
per cwt. nominally. 

Gcm Benzoin. — A fair assortment was offered to-day in- 
cluding several lots catalogued without reserve. Of 45 cases 
triarn two sold at 11/. 5*. to 11/. 10*. for small to bold 
almonds ; good bright in block, old fashioned red almondy 
block was bought in at 16'. ; another parcel of 43 cases was 
mostly disposed of at 12/. 15*. (one lot 12/. 5*. and one 
12/. 17*. 6d ) for medium block good almonds, partly loose 
siftings, nice clean bright clean and blocky, which are rather 
scarce, realised 11. 15* to 8*. ; ordinary dull bold woody 
block, 5/. 2s. 6d. to 5/. Is. 6d. ; and ordinary grey woody 
siftings in block sold cheaply at 77*. 6d. to 80*. per cwt. 
About 124 cases of Palcmhanj gum were shown, and nearlj 
all bought in ; the quality of most of these lots was inferior. 
Of about 55 cases Sumatra the greater part was disposed of 
without reserve at a decline of from 5*. to 10*. per cwt. ; 
seconds fine white almondy centres, rather false packed 
sides, good flavour, at 8/. 2s. 6d. to 8/. 10*. ; good almondy 
■centres, false packed sides and corners, at 6/. Is. 6d. to 
11. 2s. 6d. ; dull brown thirds, old fracture, some good bold 



almonds at 90*. ; and ordinary red false packed thirds at 
70*. per cwt. Ten cases fair almondy glassy Pcnang with 
false packed corners sold at 70*. to 77*. 6d. per owt. 

Gum Galbanum. — One case of sticky mass, resembling 
galbanum in appearance, but having a strong odour ot 
asafootida (imported via Holland), was bought in at 3*. 
per lb. A few weeks ago, when true galbanam was exceed- 
ingly scarce, much of this gum is said to have sold at 2*. 9//. 
to 3*. 3d. per lb. Another paroel from Liverpool, soft brown 
woody mass, was also bought in at 2s. 6d. per lb. 

Gum Guaiacum. — Rather firmly held. For 20 cases 
heavy slatey block an offer of 1*. 2d. per lb. was refused, as 
being Id. below the limit. Some good bright almondy block 
realised from Is. 5d. to 1*. 6d. per lb. 

Gum Mastic. — From Smyrna we hear, under date of 
April 4, that about 700 kilos, mastic in drop had been sold 
there at a price equivalent to 2s. per lb. f.o.b. The market 
was very firm. 

Gum Mtbrh.— In fair supply, though the demand is very 
slack. The price for fair Aden picked is 87*. Gd., and for 
good sorts 72*. 6d. to 75*. 

Gum Tbagaoanth. — Large auctions will be held to- 
morrow, at which some 1,500 packages are declared for sale. 
The demand privately remains good, fine qualities especially 
being somewhat scarce. 

Honey. — Decidedly cheaper to-day, and selling freely at 
reduced rates. Seventy-nine packages Jamaica, of new im- 
port, sold at 32*. to 33s. for brownish to pale candied ; and 
31s. to 35* 6d. for dark to good liquid brown. Good liquid 
clean amber California, in tins, was bought in at 46*. per 
cwt.; and 48 cases Italian, fine white to yellow candied, 
were also bought in at 47*. to 60s. psr cwt. 

Hypophosphites. — Lay manufacturers, who have been 
underselling each other for a considerable time, have now 
agreed to maintain the uniform quotation, and have raised 
their prices to 2s. Qd. to 2s 9d. per lb. (according to 
quantity) for hypophosphites of lime, soda, and potash. 

IndiABUBBEB. — Fine Pan! on the spot may be had now 
at 3s. 8d. ; but for May there are sellers at 3s. l^d. per lb., 
at which price business is reported. 

Indigo. — The April auctions, which were held this week, 
resulted in an average decline of 2d. to 3d. per lb. on 
Bengal; |but Kurpahs were from 3d. to 4<2., and Bimli- 
patams from 2d. to 3d. per lb. dearer; while dry-leaf Madras 
fully maintained its price. Of 7,650 cases declared, about 
3,100 sold at or after the sales. Reports from Calcutta, 
dated March 25, do not speak very cheerfully of the crop 
prospects, rains having fallen in all the producing districts, 
whereby re-sowing on an extended scale has become neces- 
sary. It is thought that there may be more rains in all dis- 
tricts but one. 

Insect Flowers. — Open Dalmatian flowers are slightly 
easier, at 68*. to 69s. per cwt., c.i.f. Trieste. Other grades 
keep steady at 75s. to 76*., c.i.f., for half-closed, and 82*. to 
83s. per cwt. for closed flowers. Trieste-ground powder. 
Lid. per lb., London terms. At the drug-sales 10 barrels 
grey powder from Venice were bought in at Is. 6//. per lb. 

Iodine. — Crude iodine remains unaltered at 9d. per oz. 
Iodides are also unchanged. 

Ipecacuanha. — Several arrivals, amounting altogether to 
232 packages, having taken place, it was tnougnt that 
prices would show a considerable decline at to-day's auc- 
tions, when 70 packages were offered. Holders, however, 
kept the article well in hand, and the value only gave way 
from 3d. to <\d. per lb. -26 serons selling at 7*. 9rf. per lb. 
for rather lean to 8*. 3d. p-r lb. for good stout sound root; 
damaged at 7*. 8d. to Is. lid. per lb. 

Jaborandi. — The new crop continues to arrive freely in 
New York, and lower rates are looked lor. Present quota- 
tion, 9$d. per lb., c.i.f. 

Jalap.— We hear that several parcels of jalap, recently 
brought to New York, were refused admission into the port 
by the Custom's officers, on the ground of the inferior 
quality of the tubers. These lots have been shipped to 
" other ports." The New York quotation for good jalap is 



570 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 



lower— viz. Is. to It. Id. per lb., c.i.f., for sound dry quality; 
the inferior parcels in question being offered at 10$d. 
per lb., c.i.f. Five bales fine heavy Vera Cruz root shown to-day 
were held for Is. 5d. per lb. From New York there was a 
quotation this week at lOd. per lb., c.i.f., but the quality 
of the root offered at that price is not stated. 

KAMALA ie dull of sale, and for 1 case shown at auction, 
which has hitherto been held at lOd. per lb., fair quality, 
9d. was to-day solicited without response. 

Kola — Of about 35 packages, only 2 bags mouldy grey 
dried West Indian sold at the high price of 6d. per lb. 

Musk. — This article was in very poor supply to day. Of 
Tonquin musk, first pile in pods, 10 tins small to medium 
old- fashioned, fairly-dry, well-trimmed pods were bought in 
without mention of price. For 3 caddies third pile, partly 
adulterated, small to bold good pods, well-trimmed thin 
brown skin and underskin, 35s. was refused, the lot being 
bought in at 55s. For 3 other caddies ordinary dull un- 
trimmed, with thick skin and underskin, 26s. per oz. would 
be accepted. An offer of 15s. per oz. was refused for 2 tins 
Russian, fair Cabardine pods. Several lots of grain- musk 
were shown and bought in, except 1 bottle of Assam, which 
realised 20s. per oz. 

Nux Vomica. — Fully 2s. dearer for fine quality. Of 135 
packages about 60 sold : good bold bright at 14s. 9^., sub- 
ject to approval; rather dark grey, 10s. 6d. to lis.; and 
ordinary damaged at 5s. per cwt. 

Oil (Castor). — At to-day's auctions 15 cases good pale 
Italian (from Genoa) were shown, and held for 4|<2. per lb. ; 
for 30 cases yellow Coconada 3|i , and for 9 cases yellow 
Madras 3£d. per lb. is asked, The Liverpool spot market is 
slow at 3£d. to 3$d. for good Calcutta seconds, but for arrival 
pricesare well maintained. Reports from Calcutta, dated 25th 
ultimo, are to the effect that the price of castor seed has risen 
in consequence of the reduction in the stock of seed. The 
demand of oil for shipment to Europe and Australia was 
good. The rise in freight, according to Calcutta reports dated 
March 25, has interfered with the shipments to Europe, while 
the demand continues good, and prices both for oil and 
seed ruled in favour of sellers, and quotations show no 
sign of weakness. 

Oil (Cod-livee). — The market has become quiet, and 
prices rule cheaper, low offers being wired daily from Ham- 
burg. Good n on- congealing new oil offers at 72s. 6d. per 
barrel, London terms. 

Oils (Essential). — The following statistical figures 
refer to the exports of citronella and lemongrass oils from 
Ceylon in the period between January 1 and March 16 : — 
1891, 2,198.400 oz. ; 1890, 1,856,000 oz. ; 1889, 3,524,212 oz ; 
1888, 1,282,616 oz. At auction to-day 25 cases Citronella 
were bought in at ]^d. per oz., which is said to be the selling 
price, lQ^d. per lb. being the c.i.f. quotation for tins. Lemon- 
grass oil is firm at lfd. per oz. Twenty-four bottles Ylang- 
Tlang, brand not named, sold at 2s. Id. to 2s. 9d. per oz. with- 
out reserve. Ten cases green Cajujmt were bought in at 3s. 9d., 
2 cases Fisher's Patehouly at is. 3d., and 2 ditto Kutmcg at 
9d. per oz. For 10 cases good crystallised Star-anise 
6s. 6d. per lb. was named as the price, which shows a 
declining market. Cassia oil is worth 3s. 6d. to 3s. 3d. per lb. 
Clove oil is offering as low as 2s. lid. to 3s. per lb. for good 
quality. Italian esfential oils are very firm, and afresh rise 
in Lemon is reported from Messina. 

Opium. — The London market is exceedingly quiet, and 
there is no change to report in the quotations given by us 
last week. Private advices from Smyrna, dated April 4, tell 
us that the beneficial rains that have fallen since the last 
days of March have saved the crops, which were in great 
danger owing to the long-protracted drought, and it is now 
hoped that there will be an abundant harvest this year 
should the weather continue favourable throughout the 
present month ; and, although one-third of the opium crop 
has been destroyed, the spring sowings which are now taking 
place may compensate for the damage caused by the frosts. 
It is as yet too early to give any correct estimate as to the 
extent of the coming crop, but, according to present appear- 
ance, the outturn will probably not be less than 7,000 to 8,000 
cases, and if that figure is attained, prices must decline later 
on. When the rain set in, the Smyrna market immediately 



declined 3d. to 4</. per lb., and about 200 cases of current 
manufacturing have been taken (mostly for the American 
markets) at the equivalent of 8s. per lb. f o.b. ; 25 cases soft 
Karahissar opium for Cuba, 8». 6\d. to 8s. 3d., and 3 or 4 
current Yerli at 8s. 4</., and another 10 cases of selected 
talequale have been sold at 8s. •{,/. The advance in the rate 
of exchange has facilitated the execution of orders at lower. 
The sales have relieved the immediate financial requirements 
of the opium-holders, and hence the market was again a 
trifle firmer at the date of our report. 

Orange-peel. — Rather more doing at low prices — 9d. to 
lOd. per lb. being accepted for fair thin bright Malta strips, 
and 44. per lb. for darker ditto. For good bright thick cut 
an offer of 6)>d. per lb. was refused. 

Pareiea Brava. — Forty-five bales were offered, bold 
root, for which 60s. per cwt. is asked. 

Patchouli-leaves. — Fourteen bales of old import, 
stalky, mouldy and very dusty, were bought in to-day at 
3«. per lb. 

Puree. — Two cases imported in 1887 sold without reserve 
at 2s. 9d. per lb. to-day. 

Quassia still continues to arrive freely, but quotations 
are unchanged, at 61. 10s. for good old, and 51. 5s. to 51. 10s. 
for new wood. At to-day's auctions about 11 tons were all 
bought in at nominal prices. 

Quicksilver. — The market is quiet, the principal im- 
porters quoting 81. 5s., and there is small business being 
transacted in second-hand at 81. 2s. 6d. per bottle. Wo 
notice an arrival this week of 480 bottles from Russia. 

Quillaia. — The Gulf of Trinidad has brought 755 bales 
from Valparaiso. 

Quinine —No business is reported on the spot this week, 
second-hand German bulk being quoted at lOd. sellers, and 
10\d. buyers. At to-day's auctions, however, 4.000 oz. of 
Whiffen's brand, warehoused in March, 1885, sold at ll^d. 
to ll^d. ; and 2,000 oz. of Zimmer's quinine, warehoused in 
1888, realised 9^d. per oz. ; this beating the previous lowest 
quotation on record. Howard's quinine is quoted by the 
makers at Is. 2d. to Is. 3d. in bulk, and Is. 4rf to Is. 5d. for 
bottles. The quotation for New York comes at 20 cents 
per oz. A sale of 10,000 oz. German bulk was reported on 
Tuesday at lQ^d. per oz. The arrivals of quinine in New 
York are falling off somewhat as compared with last year. 
From January 1 to March 31 they were :— In 1891, 870,520 
oz. ; 1890, 1,078,400 oz. 

Rhubarb.— There was a large supply of about 140 cases 
to-day, but holders being anxious to make headway 
93 cases sold at low prices as follows :—Shensi : For 
druggists' small round pale coat, 2s. 3d. to 2s. 4cZ. ; rather 
rough ditto, Is. lOd. to Is. 6d. per lb. ; round small to bold, 
three-fourths pinky, one-fourth dark fracture, slightly 
wormy, Is. 6d. to Is. 8d. ; ditto rather rough flat, Is. Id. ; fair 
pickings, 10^d. Canton: Wormy round, three-fourths 
pinky, one fourth grey, at Is. 2d. ; ditto flat. Is. Id. to Is. 2d. : 
ordinary small and very wormy at from 7\d. to 9d. ; and 
pickings at lOd. per lb. High-dried: Medium to bold good 
bright coat, nearly all pinky fracture, flat, at Is. Id. ; smaller 
at Is. 3d ; slightly wormy, half grey fracture, at 9d. to lOrf. : 
very wormy ditto, 8d. to 9d. per lb. A few lots of 
Rhapontica, rather wormy, sold without reserve at the low 
price of l^d. per lb. 

Sarsaparilla.—- Good Honduras root is worth about 
Is. 6d. per lb., but none was offered. At to-day's auctions, 
3 bales damaged chumpy Guayaquil sold at Id. per lb. 

Senega.— Ten bales chumpy root of good flavour are 
held for Is. 8d. ; two bales damaged selling at Is. Id. 
per lb. 

Senna. — Tinncvelly leaves in small supply. Of about 130 
packages, which were mostly bought in, fair small and 
medium green selling at 2d. to 2\d., ordinary dark and 
damaged at l$d. down to irf. per lb. Thirty-six packages 
Alexandrian all bought in— pods, which are scarce, at 2s. 
per lb. ; good bright medium leaf at Is. 6d. to Is. Id. 

Shellac— The market for delivery is very dull, and at 
the auctions on Tuesday of 1,553 cases catalogued 674 cases 
sold at a decline of 2s per cwt. on second orange, Is. on 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



571 



garnet, and 4s. to 5*. on button lac. The following prloes were 
paid:— Fine AS3L reddish, 73*. to 74*.; seoond orange, 
worked, ordinary reddish broken, 61*. ; one lot, 62*. ; ordi- 
nary livery ditto, 60* to 61*. ; unworked, fair palish, 62*. to 
65*. ; ordinary to fair reddish, 60*. to 62*. ; ordinary livery, 
60*. ; common ditto, cakey, 57*. to 59*. Button, 308 chests 
offered and 103 sold, unworked, ordinary firsts, 71*. ; good 
seconds, 70*. ; ordinary ditto, a few chests, at 63*. ; good 
thirds, 65*. Garnet, 90 chests offered and 35 sold, worked, 
AC good strong, 66*'. ; ditto curly at 65*. ; unworked, fine 
flat, 65*. According to Calcutta advices, dated Maroh 25, 
there was a good demand on the market for button lac, with 
very little available, and prices were advancing daily owing 
to purchases against non-deliveries. 

Simarouba.— The current quotation for this bark from 
New York is 5$d. to 6d. per lb., c.i.f. terms. 

Soy. — China soy is dull of sale: 1*. 2:]<Z. per gallon would 
probably still be the nearest value. A few days ago sales 
were reported at that figure. 

Spermaceti. — New York reports (under date of April 1) 
an improving market. Large orders from England, it is 
said, would be placed if the refiners showed some disposition 
to meet the markets, which is not the case, 1*. 6$d. to 
1*. 7f<2. per lb. c i.f. being their quotation. 

Sticklac — Higher prices have been paid, and 60*. is now 
required for eood Siam, though we have not heard of any 
sales above 55*., which was paid some time ago. 

Strophanthus. — There has been a strong demand for the 
genuine green Kombe seed, of which a parcel is said to have 
been shipwrecked on the way : only a small quantity remains, 
for which from 12*. is now asked, and we hear that 10*. has 
been refused. At the auctions about 190 lbs. West African 
brown seed were bought in at Is. 6d. per lb., an offer of 8d. 
being refused. 

Tamarinds. — There has been rather more inquiry for Bast 
Indian tamarinds lately, the quotation for fair Calcutta 
being now 9*. 6d. per cwfc. 

Tea. — The market has been liberally supplied with all 
kinds this week, but prices have kept up all round, and, in 
some cases, are firmer. A heavy Congou sale on Tuesday 
sold at steady prices for all lower grades, and sittings fetched 
A\d. to 4|<i., while commonest to fair common Newmake sold 
at 6d. to 6^d. A chop of " Crack Chop " Soomoo sold at 9d., 
a price very far below what had been asked earlier in the 
season, but poor tea. The Assam sales for the week have 
been heavy, but a very strong tone has been maintained, 
partly influenced by the knowledge that it will probably be 
the last heavy week of the season, and that Wednesday 
sales are to be discontinued. Very little tea worth touching 
can be bought under 10d., but there are still some good 
l*.-Pekoes to be picked up here and there, and these are 
likely to be wanted later. Ceylons sold on Tuesday at a 
distinct advance on quotations of the previous week for 
lower grades, but, with large quantities coming forward, 
easier prices may be looked for again. 

Tonquin Beans. — Twelve cases were offered to-day, but 
none sold. For foxy Pcra, 2s. 9d. to 3*. per lb. was asked ; 
and for good small frosted, 3*. Id. to 3*. 9d. 

Turpentine. — The collection of turpentine in France has 
been much retarded by the backwardness of the season, and 
prices have advanced in consequence. If quotations for 
spirits of turpentine should experience a further rise such 
articles as turpinhydrate and terpinol, now quoted respec- 
tively at 4*. 6d. and 7*. 3d. per lb., are likely to be affected. 

Vanilla. — V considerable supply sold to-day at a decline 
of about 1*. per lb. all round; very line 7 to 8\ in., 13*. to 
17*. ; 6 to 8$ in., 9*. 6d. to 13*. ; cottony 3| to 5 in , 8*. to 9*. ; 
fair to good chocolate, irregular lengths, from 5*. 9d. to 12*. ; 
ordinary foxy and brown, down to 3*. per lb. 

Wax (Bees'). — A considerable supply was very eagerly 
competed for, especially in Madagascar wax, which advanced 
from 5*. to 7*. 6d per cwt., while Jamaica was about 2*. 6d. 
dearer. The following prices were paid : Jamaica : fine 
orange and yellow, 71. 7s. 6d. to 71. 12*. 6d. ; good red and 
brownish from 71. to 71. 5s. Australian : good mixed colour, 
6/. 10*. to 61. 17*. 6d. Madagascar : fine orange, 140*. ; fair, 
brown and chocolate, partly slightly wormy, 125* to 



137*. 6d. ; dark brown, 115*. French bees' wax in 5 lbs. 
bars, good brown sold at 6/. 17*. 8d. Fair pale bleached 
Calcutta is held for 71. Two cases German bleached from 
Hamburg realised 91., and Moijadorc wax is held at from 61. 
to 61. 10*. for fair to fine orange. 

Wax (Japan). — For fair pale squares 42*. 6d. per cwt. is 
asked, but the market is dull. 



CHEMICALS IN THE NORTH OF ENGLAND. 



THERE has been rather more doing in chemicals during 
the week, but prices have been sliglrly in buyers' 
favour, owing to some second-hands offering under union 
prices. 

Bicarbonate op Soda easier at 61. 15*. to 71. per ton in 
1-cwt. kegs, f.o.b. Liverpool. 

Bleaching-powdeb.— Rather more doing in the Tyne 
market, and prices firm. Softwood casks, 61. 15*. per ton ; 
and hardwood casks, 71. per ton, fo.b. Tyne. Liverpool 
prices, 61. 12*. 6d. on rails for softwoods, and 71. per ton for 
hardwoods, f.o.b. Liverpool. 

Caustic Soda continues steady ; 77-per-cent. has been 
reduced to 12,1. 7s. 6d. per ton, net; 70-per-cent. quoted 
IK 10*. per ton, less 1 per cent., f .o b. Tyne. Liverpool quota- 
tions : 91. 15«. per ton tor 60-per-cent., 111. per ton for 70-per- 
cent., and 121. per ton for 74-per-cent., f.o.b. Liverpool. 

Hyposulphite of Soda. — Very firm at 71. per ton in 
5 to 7-cwt. cask3, and 71. 10*. per ton in 1 cwt. kegs, net 
cash f.o.b. Tyne ; 71. 10*. in casks, and 81. per ton in kegs 
c.i.f. Liverpool ; and 71. 12s. 6d. and 81. 2s. 6d. per ton 
delivered Manchester. 

Soda Crystals. — Slightly easier in Tyne market 
21. 15s. 6d. being quoted f.o.b. Tyne ; Liverpool price 3/. 7*. 6d 
to 31. 10*. per ton f.o.b. Liverpool. 

Soda Ash. — Very steady at 51. 7s. 6d. per ton for 48-per- 
cent. ;5l. 16s. 3d. per ton for 52- per- cent. ; and6Z 10s. per ton 
for 58-per-cent. carbonated ; 5^ 2s. 6d. per ton for 48-per-cent., 
and 51. 11*. 3d. per ton for 52-per-cent. caustic, net cash ; 
Tyne market quiet at l^d. per degree, less 3j per cent, 
for 48-52-per-cent. carbonated. 

Sulphate of Copper —Quoted at 161. 5s. per ton f.o.b. 
Liverpool. 

Sulphate of Soda — Easier at 37s. 6d. to 40*. per ton in 
bulk on rails at Widnes and St. Helens, and 42s. 6d. per ton 
free on rails or f.o.b. Tyne. Packed in casks for export price 
is 53s. per ton, less 3£ per cent, f.o.b. Tyne. 



The reason why druggists have a mortar and pestle for a 
sign is that they have to grind sixteen hours a day during 
seven days a week to make a living. 

Atropamine, the alkaloid recently discovered in bella- 
donna by Hesse, differs from the other belladonna alkaloids, 
atropine, hyoscyamine and hyoscine, in that it has no 
mydriatic action, and it also differs from apoatropine in 
producing a burning sensation and inflammation when 
dropped into the eye, apoatropine being inactive. The 
composition of atropamine is C^H^NO.,, which is the same 
as for belladonine. 

Sheep Dip.— Mr. G. Craig, of Dairy, has obtained a 
patent (No. 889), for the manufacture of a sheep dip. This 
invention relates to combinations of phenoloids. He takes 
crude oil gas of tar and agitates it with an alkaline poly- 
sulphide, heat is then applied, and after settling, the 
compound of phenoloids, alkali, and sulphur is separated 
from the supernatant oil, and may be further purified. 

How to Cure a Headache.— In cases of the ordinary 
nervous headache from whioh women suffer so much, says 
an authority, remove the dress-body, knot the hair high up 
on the head, out of the way, and, while leaning over a 
basin, place a sponge soaked in hot water, as hot as can be 
borne, on the baok of the neck. Repeat this many times, 
also applying the sponge behind the ears, and very frequently 
the pain promptly vanishes. 



572 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18, 1891. 




Memoranda for Correspondents. 

Alaayi tend your proper name and addrcti : we do not publiih them unless 
you with: if you do not.pleate ute a dittinttive nom-de-plume. 

rite on one tide of the paper only; and devote a leparate pieee of pner 
to each query if you ask more than one, or if you are writing about c titer 
mailer i at the tame time, 
a )« tend ut newspapers, please mart what you with ut to read. 
A tt utanylhing of pharmaeeuticalinterett: wethall do our bett to re\ hj. 
Before writing for formula consult the last volume, if you havi it. 
Letters, queriet, tc.,will be attended to in the order received. 



Pharmaceutical Etymology. 

Sib, — I read with much pleasure the letter of Mr. C. C. 
Bell, in your issue of April 11, on the derivation of the word 
" chemist," and I freely concur with him in his recommenda- 
tion of the concise and large dictionary of Professor Skeat, 
with which, and his "Principles of English Etymology," I 
have been Jong familiar. But to all your readers who take 
an interest in the derivation of words and the effects of time 
on the spelling of words, I would recommend the "Historical 
Dictionary," which is now being published by Dr. James 
A. H. Murray, at the Clarendon Press, for the Philological 
Society. 

The following quotation may not alone interest your 
'readers, but will serve to show somewhat of the value of this 
great work, which has for so many years engaged the Philo- 
logical Society : 

" Chemic (ke-mik), a. and sb. forms : a 6 7 chymick(e), 
chimick(e), 7 chymique, ike, 8-9 chymic, 8- chemic. [a F. 
chimique, or mod. L. chim- chymic, us, for med. L. alchimi-c- 
us ; see Al-chemic ] Chymicus began to take place of the 
earlier word, after the Renaissance, under the influence of 
etymological studies and recognition of the Greek words 
(chymos, juice, chymihos, of or concerning juices, cliymeia, 
infusion) considered to be the etymological source, it being 
held that chemistry was really c chymilte (techne), 'the 
infusory art.' The modern spelling ohe- in this word- group 
is based on the fact that clicmia, chemeia is actually found 
in Greek c. 300: see Alchemy." Then follow thirty- four 
quotations, beginning with one from Baker's " Jewel of 
Health," A D. 1576, and ending with one from the Times in 
A.D. 1886. 

The work deserves the support of every lover of the 
English language, and for those who take a pleasure in 
philology it is invaluable. 

7 Cavendish Row, Rutland Sq., Yours truly, 

Dublin, April 14. Geobge Foy, F.R.C.S. 



Sib, — Apropos to Mr. C. C. Ball's interesting letter, there 
is a line in Macbeth (original edition) which shows that the 
word " chyme " in Shakespeare's day signified a "mixture " : — 

" What rhubarb-chyme, or what purgative drug, 
Could scour those Eaglish homa ? " 

In modern editions "senna " has been absurdly substituted. 

Yours respectfully, 
Welwyn, April 13. Edmund Lawbanoe. 



Sin,— Though I do not know Mr. Seaton's authority for 
his derivation of the word " chemist," I would refer Mr. C. 
C. Bell to the English translation of Gren's " Principles of 
Modern Chemistry " (London, 1800), in the introduction to 
which the author says: "No doubt the Egyptians were, 
before other nations of high antiquity, acquainted with a 
great number of such experiments, and practising such 
operations as may be called chemical, their country has 
undoubtedly, in the course of time, given birth to the name 
' Chemia.' " 



Plutarch (" 1Mb et Osiris," page 364) says that Egypt is 
sometimes called " Chemia." Gren also says : " Chemia sig- 
nifies, according to the original sense, the 'black of the eye'; 
but also the ' hidden.' or ' secret,' has been hieroglyphically 
signified by this word, as in the Arabic, according to Bocbart. 
' Chema' signifies ' occultare.' " In later times the word 
" Chemia " was made use of to signify the science of nature, 
or, rather, magic, and especially the art of making gold and 
silver. Julius Maternus Firmicus, who lived in the age of 
Constantino the Great, is the first author making use of the 
word " alchemy," which he describes as a very well-known 
art. 

42 Castle Street East, Yours, isc, 

Oxford Street, W. Edwabd H. Stobey. 



18/61- Mr. J. Burt writes to know the derivation of " potte- 
powder," as applied to stannic oxide. 



" Tinct. Patiros." 

Sib, — With reference to Mr. Bell's query concerning the 
above, may I suggest that it is probably an alliteration of 
patrinios, patrinia jatamansi, or nardostachys jatamansi — 
the Nardus indicus, generally regarded as the ancient SDike- 
nard. C. M., June. (23/54 ) 

Birmingham, April 14. 



Symbols and Insignia. 

Sib, — A friend in the United States writes : — " I am en- 
deavouring to make a complete collection of pictorial illus- 
trations of the various badges and insignia that have been 
used from time to time in all ages to characterise or distin- 
guish the professions of pharmacy, chemistry, medicine, 
surgery, and the allied sciences, including alchemy, and 
pharmaceutical or medical colleges or similar bodies. 
Will you give me what assistance you can in this matter 
by describing such signs as may be known to you. or referring 
me to publications containing these particulars ? " 

Can any readers assist me ? 

Faithfully yours, 

Newcastle-on-Tyne, April 4. Geobge Wedbem,. 



Periodobydromethyloxychinoline. 

Sib, — In your last week's " cimmentary " upon Dr. 
Mortimer Granville's new method of treatment for cancer, 
his improved remedy, a " periodobydromethyloxychinoline" 
is described by you as " an iodo derivative of antipyrin." As 
this is not really the case, we think it right to mention that 
the compound in question — which we prepared at the request 
of Dr. Granville — we believe to be chemically a thallin 
derivative. But, as the medicinal properties were found by 
Dr. Granville so distinct from those possessed by normal 
thallin compounds, he wished it to be prescribed under a 
distinctive name. We therefore suggested that the assumed 
base might be provisionally known by the name at one time 
applied to thallin, as indicating its connection with chinoline, 
from which it is manufactured. 

We are, Sir, yours faithfully, 

April 15. Squibe & Soss. 



What's in a Name?— Sib, — I send you a cutting from 
a communication of J. Mortimer Granville's to The Lancet, 
No. 3,527, p. 798, which, when found, make a note of: — 

"Instead of thallin I u>c a jtcriodhydromcthyloxychinoline 
because that is better bonis, and seems to be more effective 
t/ian the tetrahydrojiaraqui nasol." These two words woulcl 
be a good penn'orth in a telegram. Yours, 

Epiqbammatist. (.1 correspondent of " Punch.") 



Glycerine Cement— Toluidin. 

Sib, — While fully admitting that it is desirable to adopt 
an attitude of scepticism towards many of the formula-! 
which crowd the columns of the technical press, and are 
without inquiry imported into those of " semi-scientific news- 
papers," I have noticed with some amusement the scathing 
criticism of glycerine and litharge as a cemen f , made under 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



573 



the '" Miscellaneons Inquiries " heading [in your lost issue. 
Permit me to point out — firstly, that this mixture was intro- 
duced by Rost as long ago as 1872, and has since then been 
mentioned at least three times in that most accessible of 
works of reference, the " Year Book of Pharmacy," once 
(1880, p. 348) with some detail, and in a citation from no 
less an authority than "Dingler's Journal." Secondly, that 
from personal experience I am able to write of it as a very 
good cement indeed, which does all that has been claimed 
for it. When properly made — which means that the lead 
oxide must be very intimately mixed with the glycerine — it 
sets firmly in a few hours or days as the proportion of 
glycerine is less or greater, and gets harder as it grows 
older. For mending rough earthenware it is invaluable. I 
have no doubt that there are many other applications for 
which it has been, or may be, found equally useful. Thus, 
Sir, it will be seen that it by no means follows that because 
a formula teems unlikely, it should be dismissed as unworthy 
the trouble of an experiment. 

In Mr. R. Wright's marking-ink receipt (C. 4' -°-> March 21) 
ortho-toluidin is mentioned as a solid body, and this view is 
apparently endorsed by yourself in an answer to a correspond- 
ent in your last number. The body intended is evidently para- 
toluidin, which is a solid ; while the ortho, sometimes called, 
curiously enough, pseudo-tohxxAvo, is a liquid. 

Yours faithfully, 

Dublin, April 13. Habby Napieb Deapeb. 



Sib, — Several months ago I noticed, in a photographic 
periodical, the above cement recommended for repairing 
developing-dishes. Having in hand a large mortar which 
had given way at an old and gradually extending crack, I 
rubbed up a little litharge with glycerine to the consistence 
of treacle, smeared over the broken edges, bound the mortar 
with a strong twine, and set aside for several weeks. The 
mortar is now in almost daily use, but, of course, is only used 
for mixing powders. The exuded cement which was scraped 
off was of the consistence of a stiff extract. 

Yours, &c, 

J. G. F. (22/47.) 



Sib, — I remember an engineer some years ago telling me 
that the best cement he knew was a mixture of glycerine 
and litharge. I think the success in making lies in the pro- 
portion of the ingredients and the manner of mixing. He 
mixed a little glycerine with the litharge, and beat it into a 
stiff plastic cake with a hammer. 

I prepared a little to-day by adding sufficiency of glycerine 
to make a damp powder (not paste), then beating it with a 
heavy iron pestle in an iron mortar. It set within an hour. 

Fountainbridge, Edinburgh. Duncan Mc3lashan. 



Liebreich's Discoveries. 

8iB, — Hardly has the world recovered from the shocking 
dMfcovery of Tuberculinum Kochii and the unsatisfactory 
result - which have arisen from it, another great invention 
flfom the Fatherland, apparently of equal value, is making its 
way over the globe. 

f I refer to Dr. Liebreich's hypodermic administration of 
Cantharidinum. Frequently have I heard the question raised, 
Whatever made Liebreich think of Cantharides in connection 
with the treatment of consumption ? Everybody will have 
thought this invention was the result of careful physiological 
experiments, but, as we shall see from the following extract 
of the " Deutsche Tageblatt," Professor Liebreich has only 
followed the same track as Professor Koch, who hastily 
applied Jenner's and Pasteur's ideas in the wrong direction 
with such fatal results. The article says : It will perhaps be 
of interest to receive some genetic explanations on the 
medical discoveries of Professor Liebreich, who, as we know, 
recommended some time ago Cantharidinum as a hypodermic 
injection for tuberculosis of the larynx. Some years ago, 
Professor Liebreich surprised the medioal world by the 
discovery of Lanolinum, which he employed for Bkin 
diseases. He patented this invention, together with Messrs. 
Jaffe and Darmstaedter, who have established an excel- 
lent business in this article. The writer, who is somewhat 
acquainted with the works of Pliny, soon discovered that 



this so called " Lanolinum Liebreich " wa« a preparation very 
well known to the old Romans and t a* it was utronirlv 
reoommended by Pliny the Elder (vide P,iay, Nat. History, 
b. 29, oh, 10) for the same purpose for which Liebreich 
recommends it now. When Professor Liebreich brought 
forward his latest discovery this year, the writer naturally 
again made reference to Pliny the Elder, and was not surprised 
to find, a few pages after the description of Lanolinum in 
Pliny (b. 29, ch. 30) that an Egyptian physician at the time 
of Tiberius employed an extract of Cantharides in the 
same manner as Professor Liebreich recommends it. for the 
cure of a disease similar to Lupus (vide Pliny, b. 26, ch. 2) 
Pliny deals, in oonneotion with the Lanolinum, also on the 
great efficacy of eggs, which he recommends for erysipelas, 
burns, &c. We may therefore to-day perhaps prophetically 
predict that Professor Liebreich will next year discover the 
" Ovinum." in order to harmonically conclude the circle of 
his scientific discoveiies. 

I am, Sir, yours obediently, 

Ben Akiba. 



city of Pharmaceutical Certificates. 

Sib,— It is to be hoped that the letter of the President of 
the Pharmaceutical Society of Queensland in your issue of 
April 4 will be the means of having a reciprocity clause 
introduced into the Pharmacy Act Amendment Bill, now 
before the House of Commons. The subject has been dis- 
cussed and delayed so long that the good services of some 
member interested in the drug trade should be enlisted to 
bring about so desirable a result. Yours obedientlv. 

April 8. Devon. (19|36.) 



Drug Contracts. 

Sib, — I notice your remarks on drug contracts (April 4), 
I think the first object should be quality, to get the best drugs 
and have them examined by a competent man. I recollect 
many years back a list from a public institution to be priced 
and competed for. In it was virgin scammony 3 lbs. The 
gentleman who had the contract supplied an article which 
cost him 34s. per lb. They returned it saying " could not 
use such rubbish." The warehouseman hardly knew what 
to do. It was suggested they did not know the virgin, so sent 
them Aleppo, costing 18s. They sent back to know how 
much more this would be. I saw both articles myself. Thus 
you will see the necessity to have competent examiners. 

One who has left the trade many years, but still feels 
sufficient interest to take The Chemist and Dbugchst. 

Branscombe, April 9. (20 5.) 



Explosion of a Glass Mortar. 

Sib, — As I was dissolving ^j. of plumbi.acet. in 2 oz. aqua 
in a 4-oz. glass mortar, and about to pour into bottle, the 
mortar exploded with a loud noise, and left me with the 
pestle in my hand. On examining: the broken mortar, the 
largest piece weighed a little over 80 grs. 

Largo, Fife, April 4. S. G. (21/68.) 

[ We have at various times recorded a number of similar 
cases : tumblers exploding when a seidlitz powder is being 
mixed, &c. The cause is the stirring. A peculiar touch of 
the pestle on a particular spot of the glass suddenly disturbs 
the molecular cohesion, and the vessel is shattered into frag- 
ments.] 



Out- door Apprentices. 

gin, Will you kindly inform us in your next issue, if yon 

can make it convenient, what are t lie usual conditions of 
out-door (living with parents) apprenticeship at present 
time including length of term, and premium, if anv ? 

Ebson. (23/55.) 

[Three years and no premium we should state as the 
usual conditions in England ; the same period, and 10/. to 
20/. per annum in Scotland. Correspondents, please correct 
in if wrong.] 



574 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[April 18. 1891. 



DISPENSING NOTES. 



The opinions of practical readers are invited on subjects 
discussed under this heading. 



What is Meant ? 

We have a few more letters on this matter. It is only 
necessary to notice the following briefly. The prescription, 
it will be remembered, was : — 

Solut. hydr. perculorid tlr. 

Strength to make each teaspooaful = 1 in 5,000 
Sig. Add two te.upoonfuU t) J gallon of water for bath. 

20/2. F. If , in support oE his solution— 112 grains of 
mercuric chloride to the 4 oz., as opposed to double that 
quantity — says : " The great point is that those who give 
the latter amount say 5j. to £ gall.' of water, but the 
prescription distinctly says ' 5i.i- to £ gall.' of water. Now, 
if we make the solution with 7 grs. to 3j., and then wrote 
the label, what would be the result ? 5ij. are put to £ gall, 
of water, and the mixture would be just double strength — 
viz , 1 in 2,500. I have asked the opinion of three medical 
practitioners, and they also agree with me. I have had a 
few years' hospital dispensing, and this was a very common 
mode of ordering hydrarg. perchlor. The best thing would 
be if the chemist could consult the prescriber, and show the 
reason why he asked, and. then let us know result." 



21/65. Edmund Larvrance says: "Two questions were 
propounded : —(1) What did the prescriber mean ? (2) What 
quantity of perchloride should be used? Kespectiog ques- 
tion 1, after reading the instructive letters elicited, I have 
little doubt that the prescriber meant a bath of 1 grain in 
5,000. But, as to question 2, there can be no doubt that the 
words of the prescription signify a solution 1 grain in 
5.000 = -35 in 4 oz. Would it not, therefore, in view of 
JVIr. Coroner's eccentricities, be the duty of a dispenser to 
make himself or employer secure by following verba ipsa 1 



A Quinine Mixture. 

Sih, — I should feel obliged if you could suggest a remedy 
for the following difficulty : — I put up a tic nervine balsam, 
and, after a day or two (especially in winter), long acicular 
crystals are deposited on the bottom and sides of the bottle. 
What addition or alteration would you make to obviate this 1 
'The following is the formula : — 

Qniuinae sulph .. gr. xij. 

Tr. ferri perchlor 3ij. 

Liq. morph. mur 3iss. 

„ ammon. acet. cone. (B.P.) .. .. 3ss. 

Acid, bydrobrom. dil 3j. 

Aq. ad Ivj. 

M.s.a. 

Tic. (22 2.) 

[The crystals are acetate of quinine, formed by interaction 
of the quinine sulphate and ammonium acetate. The solu- 
tion of the latter is useless, and should be omitted.] 



22/64. Cambria. — Yes. Next time send your name. 



Iodide Mixture. (260/52) 

SiR. — I have made two quantities of this mixture — one as 
written, the other with glycerine instead of ext. glycyrrh.liq. — 
and both seem permanent, there being as yet no sign of free 
iodine. As you say, the reaction producing free iodine does 
not usually take place with scale- preparations. Are they 
always ferric, although made with freshly-precipitated ferric 
°* id e 1 Adelaide. (163/91.) 



9/5. Carbolic Acid in Pill. — A good excipient is to use 
some p. trag. co., and a few drops of water if necessary. 

Adelaide. (163/91.) 



LEGAL QUERIES. 

20/8. Yoikshirc Anyone may draw a tooth and make a 
charge for doing 60, but only a registered dentist can re- 
cover on such a claim in a law court. 



22/20. P.JB - There is no legal objection to your card. 
You must not in any way describe yourself as a dentist, nor 
can you recover in a court of law for dental operations, but 
you are entitled to perform them and get paid for them if 
you can. 



21/66. Itheum. — It is legal for anyone to adopt any name 
he likes for trading purposes so long as he does not by so 
doing infringe on anyone else's trading rights. But it is not 
strictly legal for a registered chemist to sell and label 
poisons under any but his own name. But this illegality is 
committed in such high quarters that it can hardly be dan- 
gerous. 8ee Diary, 1891, page 329. Every member of a 
firm must be registered. Apply to the Secretary of the 
Pharmaceutical Society about associateships. 



19/38. F. S. F. — The widow of a chemist and druggist 
can only carry on the business of her deceased husband if 
she is his executrix or administratrix. She must employ a 
qualified assistant. 



20/6. Yorltshireman. — The model regulations of the 
Board of Trade provide that " any duly stamped weight or 
measure, or any weighing instrument found by the inspector 
to be in use for trade before January 1, 1891, may continue 
to be used, or may be stamped, provided it be found by the 
inspector to be correct, and that it is not constructed in such 
manner as to facilitate the commission of fraud." Local 
authorities may, it appears, make their own requirements. 
You should ascertain what these are. 



22/41. Abbott. — The claim made by your rival is absurd if 
it rests simply on the copyright of his pamphlet. It would 
be impossible, by any sort of registration, to secure a mono- 
poly in such titles as those you mention. It is conceivable 
that one of you may have so imitated the business methods 
of the other as to make it possible for an injunction to be 
applied for, but we do not see sufficient evidence of this in 
the papers you send. 



21/18. Justice. — Chloroform is a poison within the mean- 
ing of the Pharmacy Act, 1868. 



20/71. Climax. — " Seidlitz-powder " is not given in the 
Pharmacopoeia (Additions) as a synonym for pulv. sodre tart, 
effervescens. It is simply stated in a foot-note that " effer- 
vescent tartrated soda -powder is commonly known as 
seidlitz-powder." This would not necessarily justify a prose- 
cution under the Sale of Food and Drugs Act if something 
different were sold under the name " seidlitz-powder " ; but 
it would furnish strong presumptive evidence. See article 
on the subject, page 784 last volume (December 6, 1890). 



22/70. Bridge. — By an Inland Revenue Act of last year 
it was provided that every excise licence (except that of an 
auctioneer, appraiser, or broker) should only authorise the 
person licensed to carry on business in one set of premises. 
Extra licences for patent medicines, methylated spirit, &c, 
must now be taken, therefore, for every shop. 



159/29. Alpha. — The graph-composition patent will be in 
force until November 13, 1892. 



22/65. Alpha.— Jahnoke's patent for making small tin 
boxes is void. 



April 18, 1891.] 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



575 



MISCELLANEOUS INQUIRIES. 

Correspondents who ask replies to be inserted " this week " or 
"next week" are reminded that we do not guarantee 
replies, and that their insertion depends upon the space 
at our disposal for such matters. It is generally impossible 
for us to find room for queries the same week they are 
received. 



244/45. Amylum (Calcutta). — You will find the cream of 
information regarding the Manufacture of Varnishes in 
The Chemists' and Druggists' Diary, 1890. A very 
good book is Cameron's " Oils and Varnishes," published by 
Churchill. The various Enamel paints have an oleo- 
resinous basis, such as this : — Copal (or similar resin), 1 part ; 
boiled linseed oil, 9 parts ; turpentine or light camphor oil, 
2 to 4 parts. The resin has to be heated carefully to about 
140° C, and the linseed oil added to it at about the same 
temperature. It requires experience to know when and how 
to mix the resin and oil properly, so as to obtain a solution. 
The turpentine is merely added to thin the basis, which should 
be done when cold. 



19/8. S. G. B — (1) Directions for making the Many- 
coloured. Show-bottle are given in our issue of August 31, 
1889, page 309. (2) Crystals fit for Exhibition may be 
made by suspending a cord, or wire shaped to the form de- 
sired, in warm saturated solutions of the salts required. A 
linen bag, filled with the powdered salt, should also be sus- 
pended in the solution, so as to replace what is taken out. 
The cord or wire should first get a slight : deposit of the 
crystals on it, by dipping in a boiling solution and allowing 
to dry. 



16/50. Taprobane (Ceylon). — (1) You do not mention the 
number in which the reply was contained, and we cannot 
trace it ; but filtration through paper would doubtless be 
meant. See a similar process for the Estimation of 
Caffeine in our issue of February 21, page 259. Of course, 
on the manufacturing scale processes have to be very con- 
siderably modified. Filtration, for instance, is generally 
done with a filter-press, using closely-woven canvas as the 
filtering medium. Canvas without the press may do in your 
case. (2) We forwarded replies to you recently. (3) The 
absence of quotations for croton seeds shows that none have 
been offering. We shall keep the matter before us. 



13/17. Pharmacist.^ -Griffith's " Manures " (G. Bell & Co., 
lO.-t. 6d ) is a safe book on manures. There is none on the 
analysis of cattle-foods that we know of. Some useful in- 
structions appeared in a report of the Highland Agricultural 
Society about seven years ago. 



17/54. W. T. — Ringworm in Cattle.— The following 
application is recommended : — 

Acid, carbolic 3j< 

8p. v. meth .. 3vj. 

Glycerini !▼]'. 

Aquce 3vj. 

M. 

To be applied with a small brush on three consecutive 
days. 



22/26. C. J. B. — We are sorry to hear that two wholesale 
houses are unable to supply you with Kieselguhr. That 
shows a want of enterprise somewhere. We could give the 
names of merchants who deal in the article largely, but they 
would not supply lots of a few pounds' weight. Tons are 
more in their way. So much Kieselguhr is used in the 
manufacture of dynamite, disinfecting-powder, and the like, 
that it seems incredible that suppliers of retail chemists 
cannot oblige their customers by stocking it. 



16/31. Bens. — In almost every volume of The 
Chemist and Druggist you will find formula for denti- 
frices, which by slight modification can be made to suit your 
purpose. In our issue of May 3, 1890, page 599, there is a 
formula for a Liquid Foaming Dentifrice, which by altera- 
tion of perfume and the addition of carbolic acid would suit 
your purpose. The basis for such dentrifices is quillaia. 
The following, for example, may be taken as an all-round 
basis to which any perfumes, antiseptics, or colouring may 
be added in due proportion : — 

Oz. 



Quillaia, in coarse powder 1 

Reotlflcd Bplrlt 3 

Glycerine 1 

Water 6 



Mix the liquids, and macerate the quillaia in the mixture for seven days- 
agitating daily. Then strain, press the marc thoroughly, and Alter. 

It is unnecessary to make up this extract to a specific 
volume. For a Carbolic Dentitrioe, flavoured with laven- 
der, you might try the following : — 



The above basis .. 4 oz. 

Carbolic acid 10 grs. 

Oil of lavender 20 mins. 

Otto of rose. . 5 ,, 



Colour a pale yellow with tincture of saffron, and then add a mere trace 
of aniline violet. 

It is as well to keep in mind that all the foaming dentifrices 
lose the frothing property in the course of time. For 
Carbolic Tooth-powder you may try the following: — 



Terra alba, fine sifted 8 oz. 

Orris powder li „ 

Powdered white soap J • • 

Carbolic acid 30 gi s. 

Camphor 30 ,. 

Otto of rose 10 drops 

Solution of carmine 10 ,. 



Rub up the otto and carmine solution with the terra alba ounce by- 
ounce for ten minutes, and set aside. Rub the carbolic aflld and camphor 
in a mortar until liquid, then mix the orris with it awl the soap. Mix. 
these with the perfumed terra alba, and sift. 



18/53. W. G. S— Mistura Ferri Aperiens, U.C.H :— 



Sulphate of magnesia 60 grs. 

,, iron 4 ,. 

Diluted sulphuric acid if mins. 

Peppermint-water to 1 oz. 

Dissolve and mix. 



18/48. F. O. G— All the recipes we have for glycerine- 
and cucumber contain the pomade. You should try the 



compound offered by advertisers in this journal, to which 
only water and glycerine have to be added. We have tried 
Rouse & Co.'s, which is excellent. 



18/44. W. L. — We have never heard of sulphuric acid- 
being used in aerated waters in the manner which you men- 
tion. It is sometimes added to soluble essences to neutralise 
alkali. 



18/56. Sapine —You can utilise the isinglass by mace- 
rating it in double its weight of water, and when it is soft 
adding as much glacial acetic acid and dissolving by the 
aid of heat. This will make a good cement. 



22/12. J. Thompson. — You will find a formula for White 
Oils in our issue of April 4. 



19/10. Stuart.— There is a useful volume on " Brewing " 
in Churchill's Technological Series. 



22/66. R. G. M.— Your " Kings College M.D." has cribbed 
the formula verbatim from us. It was publislud in the 
Diary for 1881. 



r>7 6 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST. 



[Ap:tl 18, 1891. 



21/5. Student.— Write to the Secretary, Apothecaries' 
■Company, Blackfriars, LondoD, ICC , in regard to the 
assistants' examination. 



2216. G. B. P. — Books for Counter-prescribing. 
We repeat that there is no book published on counter- 
prescribing exoept our DiABYof 1890; all the medical books 
which take in the treatment of common complaints are 
popular ; none are specially intended for chemists. What 
you must do is to combine the popular and the purely 
medical works. Thus, of the former, there is no better 
cheap work, dealing with common complaints, than Begbie's 
" Medical Information and Advice " (Nelson, 2s. 6d ), and 
along with this you may read Hooper's " Physician's Vade 
Mecura" (10th edition, 1882, 12s. 6d.). Sometimes second- 
hand copies of earlier editions of the latter can be picked 
up. In " Squire " there is a therapeutic index which is 
valuable in prescribing. There is an art in counter-prescrib- 
ing, as there is in everything else, which books cannot teach, 
and the most important feature of the art is to know where 
not to prescribe. 



21/59. Reader Abroad (Natal) asks : " What is the best 
way 10 remember drugs incompatible with one another ?" 
The royal road is a knowledge of pharmaceutical chemistry; 
mnemonics is useless here. There is a very good list of 
incompatibles in " The Art of Dispensing," and a careful 
study of the work as a whole conduces towards a solution of 
the difficulty. This is not a matter of memory, however ; it is 
skill and knowledge. 



22/28. Bowman Smith asks : " Could you kindly tell me 
the tribe of people who file their teeth to points, and their 
reason for so doing ? " There are several who do this in 
Africa ; but perhaps the tribe our correspondent is thinking 
of is the Dyaks of Borneo. Custom is what makes them do 
it ; they think it the proper thing, just as shaving is with 
some of us. 



22/63. W. P. — Sir Morell Mackenzie's " Manual of 
Diseases of the Throat " (10s. 6d.), or his "Hygiene of the 
Vocal Organs " (6s.), would aid you in your study prepara- 
tory to devising a lozenge. < 



Information Supplied. 

Liq. Perrl Pernit.— In regard to " Ferrum's " inquiry, is it 
not the manufacture rather than the B.P. which is at fault ? 
Did your correspondent attend to B.P. instructions about 
moderating the action, and heat, by dilution, if violent ? 
My first experience, many years ago, taught me that lesson. 
I allowed the action to have its own way, when a dark 
liquid precipitating ferric oxide was the result, part of the 
nitric acid being decomposed, and the flask was so hot that 
it could hardly be handled. I, however, tried again, being 
careful this time not only to read, but to understand, the 
B.P , when I got a liquor which was satisfactory in every 
wa y- Adelaide. (163/91.) 



Information Wanted. 

[Replies to the following requests are solicited ly correspon- 
dents of The Chemist and Druggist.] 

155/33. An expert Suffolk rat-killer has been playing 
havoc with rats on Forfarshire farms. He feeds them for a 
day or two with a composition, of which they seem to be 
very fond, and then he introduces some poisonous material 
which kills them speedily. The poison has also the valuable 
property of converting the carcases into a sort of mummies, 
so that no offensive smell results. A correspondent is 
anxious to know what the Suffolk man (Cordle, his name) 
uses. This would be generally interesting, and we should be 
pleased if anyone could give the information. 

13/49. Model head, with articulated jaws, for a dental 
show-case. Where obtainable ? 



VETERINARY COUNTER PRACTICE. 

Now ready. Price 3». 6d. ; post free, 3s, 9d. ; pp 268. 

(Uniform with "The Art of Dispensing.") 

Contents:-— Medical and Surgical Treatment of Domestic 
Animals ; Veterinary Medicines ; Miscellaneous Veterinary 
Formula:; Diseases of the Horse; Lameness in Horses; 
Dentition of the Horse ; Diseases of Cattle ; Diseases of 
Sheep ; Diseases of Pigs ; Diseases of Dogs ; -Treatment 
of Eye Diseases ; Wounds, Sores, &c., in Animals ; Diseases 
of Poultry; Appendix. 

We must remind purchasers that we cannot send copies 
of any of our publications for enclosure. Any of the 
wholesale houses will supply them. The following firms have 
already undertaken to stock 1 Veterinary Counter Practice " 
and our other manuals, and will supply any of them at the 
published price : — 

Ayrton Si Saunders, 149 Duke Street, Liverpool 
Barclay Si Sous (Limited), 95 Farringdon Street, B.C. 
Boileau Si Boyd, 91-93 Bride Street, Dublin 
Olay, Dod & Co , 52 St. Anne Street, Liverpool 
Dnncan, Flbckhart & Co , 10* S. Canon .'ate, Edinburgh 

Edwards, Wm., Si Son., 157 Queen Victoria Street, B.C. 

Evans, Gadd & Co., 97 Fore Street, Exeter 

Evans, Lescher & Webb,60 Bartholomew Close, E.C. 

Evans, Sons Si Co., 55 Hanover 8treet, Liverpool 

Ford, Shapland it Co., 6 Great Turnstile, High Holborn, W.C. 

Glasgow Apothecaries Company, 32 Virginia Street, Glasgow 

Harris, Philip, Si Co. (Limited), Birmingham 

Holmes. W. Si R., 5 Dunlop Street, Glasgow 

Ismay, John, & Sons, Newcastlc-on-Tyne 

Lennon, B. G., & Co., Port Elizabeth 

Lennon & Tcbb, Cape Town 

Lewis, H. K., 133 Gower Street, W.C. 

Lloyd. T. Howard, <t Co., Leicester 

May, Robeits Si Co., 9 Clerkenwell Road, E.C. 

Newsholme, G. T. W., 74 Market Place, Sheffield 

Oldfie d, Pattinson & Co., 17 Todd Street, Manchester 

Pinkerton, Gibson it Co., Edinburgh 

Potter .v Olarke, Raven Row, Artillery Lane, E. 

Rairncs, Clark & Co., Edinburgh 

Raimes Si Co , York 

Sanger, John, & Sons, 489 Oxford Street, W. 
Silverlock, H., 92 Blackiriars Road, S.E. 
Sontball Bros. Si Barolay, Birmingham 
Sutton, W., & Co., 76 Chiswell Street, E.C. 
Woolley, James, Sons & Co., Manchester 

Our other Treatises are : — 
(280 pages.) 



" The Art of Dispensing 
3s. lOd. 

Alpe's " Medicine Stamp Duty." 
post, 2s. 9d. 

Proctor's " Pharmaceutical Testing 
by post, 2s. 9d. 



3s. 6d. ; by post 
(142 pages.) 2s. 6d.; by 
(176 pages.) 2s. 6d; 



AT THE COUNTER. 



of 



' Do you sell Gethsamene root ? " was the question asked 
a Birmingham pharmacist the other day. Gelsemium 



Root was supplied. 



Specimens from Lavender Hill, S.W. — " Id. paregoric 
Id. matrimonial wine for a cough mixture ; Id. perfection of 
senna ; tin of Brand's consecrated beef-tea." 



" To-day," writes a chemist from Haverstock Hill, " we 
were asked for a pennyworth of Ally's Inkermann yellow. 
Basilicon was supplied. The other day we were asked for a 
stiffening powder for the baby. A Stedman's powder was 
sent." 



" Please can you give me something to rub the waxing- 
.iurrjals in the throat" is a document received by a chemist 
at Newcastle- on-Tjne. 



April 18, 1891 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 23 




(25 inches higli.) 

These celebrated Statuettes are supplied free to Retail 
Buyers upon conditions to be obtained on application to 



A. & F. PEARS, 

71-75 New Oxford Street, W.C. 



24 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Apiur. 18, 1891 



HURON, SQUIRE & FRANCIS 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT DRUGGISTS, 
ANALYTICAL AND MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS. 




SOLE CONSIGNEES FOE SAINT MARCO LITHIA WATER. 

N.B.— The only natural Lithia Water ever awarded a Gold Medal. 



LATEST REMEDIES IN PHARMACY AND THERAPEUTICS. 

SPECIALITIES — " HERON " BRAND. 



ESS. PRO MIST. FERRI CO. 

1-7. 

It has the strong odour and bitter aromatic taste of good 
quality myrrh combined with the fragrant smell of volatile 
oil of nutmeg. 

EXT. EUONYmTlIQ. 

A reliable Hepatic and Intestinal Stimulant. 

EXT. KOL/E LIQ. 

A strong Tonic and Stimulant to the Nervous System, a 
most successful remedy in Sea-sickness. 

EXTRACT OF MALT IN VACUO. 

Keeps perfectly, and possesses the characteristic flavour 
of malt. 



EXT. SALICIS NIGR/E LIQ. 

A powerful Sexual Sedative, similar in its action to Potas- 
sium Bromide, but without its depressing qualities. 



EXT. SENN/E LEGUMIN. LIQ. 

A non-irritating, tasteless, and certain Laxative in obstinate 
Constipation. 

LIQ. IPECAC. PRO VINO. 

1-19. 

Contains 1£ per cent, of Emetine, and gives a Vinum Ipecac, 
that is bright, stable, and uniformly active. 

PEPSIN GLYCER. ACID. 

A strong solution of peptic principles of definite strength : a 
stable and digestive fluid of great activity. 



SOL. PEPSIN c. EUONYMIN. 

A Biliary Stimulant and Digestive Agent of pronounced 

efficacy. 

INFANTS' FOOD MALTED. 

Supplied in bulk and in tins with plain labels. 



FLUID EXTRACT OF MALT IN VACUO. 

CONCENTRATED LIQUORS AND LIQUID EXTRACTS. 



MANUFACTURERS OF EVERY GLASS OF PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. 



Telegraphic Address-" FRANCIS LONDON." 

38 SOUTHWARK ST., LONDON. 



52 



A Phil IS, 1S91 



THE CHEMIST AXD DRUGGIST 



•>r. 



THE OLD ORIGINAL HOME OF COCA WINE (ARM BRECHT). 




STORE ROOM 



l J M A H M A C Y 



ARMBREGHT, NELSON & C? 

2,3 & 4, DUKE STREET, GROSVENOR SQUARE. 

LONDON. 



26 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST April 18, 18W 



SKELETON OF A FINE PERUVIAN COCA LEAF 

(Enlarged by Photography), 




BY THE PROPRIETOR OF 

ARMBRECHT'S COCA WINE, 2, 3, i Duke St, Grosvenor Square, LONDON. 



54 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



27 



AN UNSOLICITED CERTIFICATE 

OF THE EFFICACY OF 

ARMBRECHT'S COCA WINE. 



N.B. — The following conversation between two Sweeps was overheard, and we have endeavonred to reproduce, as far as 
possible, the position of the Sweeps and the words, only the Sweep who asks if the Wine was good for Asthma was short, 
fat, and bent, but the artist has made him thin and erect, and we had no time to get it corrected. 




1st Sweep. — What goes out in them there Boxes? 
2nd Sweep.— Why " Coca Wine " ! ! ! 

1st Sweep.— "Coca Wine." What air that? Good for Hashmer? 
2nd Sweep.— " Hashmer." Why, it's good for heverythink. Had a taste of 
it when I swept that old cove's chimbly, and jolly fine stuff it is, too. 

Tahlevx — — — Curtain. 

ARMBRECHT, NELSON & CO., 2, 3, 4 DUKE ST., GROSVENOR SQUARE, LONDON. 

COME AND TASTE OUR HAPPY 3VIEPIXJIVI. 

See page 59 (bottom folio), for Prices and Order Sheet. 



55 



28 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Apkil 18, 1891 



THE CHEIIST AID DRUGGIST, of March 7th, 1891, 





"PROPRIETARY ARTICLES were what our traveller had 
chiefly in view on his rounds last month, his desire espe- 
cially being to learn something of the way in which well- 
known medicines are produced, and to chat with the men at 
the wheels. 



Armbrecht's Coca Wise. 
The external appearance of the Duke Street Pharmacy, 
which is the present headquarters of Messrs. Armbrecht, 
.-• Nelson & Co.'s coca-wine business, 

is indicative of activity rather than 
stately repose. The building is an 
old one, and, so far as outward and 
I visible appearance of progress is 
tSS^sSBk concerned, the " future house of the 
*sBIk££83mP coca wine," depicted in the advertis- 
ing pages of our Diary, will be a far 
more fitting temple for the business, 
which has grown up under Mr. 
Armbrecht's care during the last decade, than its present 
abode. But the new building will not be quite completed, 
Mr. Armbrecht told us, until January or February of next 
year, although he expects to have the use of part of the 
basement before that time. That will be a considerable 
relief to him, for it is in respect of cellarage that he is worst 
off at present. The cellars under Nos. 2 and 4 Duke Street 
are now absolutely choked with casks. 

Under the building now in use five cellars are used for 
the storage of wine and other purposes. At the time of our 
visit these contained 36 hogsheads and 7 pipes of wine in 
course of preparation. A hogshead holds about 5(5 gallons, a 
pipe double that quantity; but an average of the 2,800 
gallons of wine in course of preparation is by no means 
sufficient to keep pace with the demand that has been created 
for Mr. Armbrecht's speciality. The prepared wine is left to 
mature, and the bottled goods are stored away in ten other 
cellars ; and there are, in addition, two cellars devoted to the 
preparation and storage 'of "coca champagne "-—a beverage 
which was added to the list of Mr. Armbrecht's specialities 
ome time since. 



Coca-leaves only are employed in the preparation of the 
coca wine. Mr. Armbrecht told us that he had tried hydro- 
chlorate of cocaine also, but discarded it because it did not 
yield so satisfactory an article as the leaves. ■ The idea or 
starting the manufacture of what has now grown into a con- 
siderable trade occurred to Mr. Armbrecht some ten years 
ago, when on a visit to a friend in Germany — a medical man 
who was enthusiastic in the praises of the remedy then newly 
discovered as a local aniesthetie. Mr. Ambrecht had been 
paying some attention to the production of a new speciality 
for fatigue and insomnia, and he decided to experiment with 
the coca-leaf in this direction. At first his manufacture was 
quite in the nature of an experiment, but some of his 
customers and a few medical men gradually gave him hints 
which he turned to good use, and these, coupled with his 
own researches in the properties of the coca-leaf and its 
principles, gradually enabled him to build up his present 
trade. His first purchase of coca-leaves amounted to 2 lbs., 
while the last order he gave to a firm of brokers two months 
ago was, he told us, for half a ton. Mr. A.mbrecht uses 
the pale-green leaves by preference, as they contain least j 
mucilage. During the first period of manufacture it was 
usual to press the leaves to extract all the valuable con- 
stituents ; but that manipulation is now dispensed with 
for the sake of obtaining a clearer product. For the 
manufacture of extract, however, the leaves are still sub- 
jected to pressure, and we were shown a hand-press, in 
one of the cellars, which is occasionally used, and can be 
worked by two men so as to yield a pressure equal to SO 
tons. 

The question of how to regulate the absorption of the ooca 
alkaloid by the wine so as to ensure constancy is one of Mr. 
Armbrecht's two trade secrets, but he assured us that no 
wine ever left his place which was not carefully tested in this 
respect. There are just half-a-dozen varieties of wine in Mr. 
Armbrecht's list at present— " medium," Burgundy, Malaga, 
port, sherry, and champagne. The composition of the 
"medium " wine, which has by far the largest sale of the six 
varieties, is Mr. Armbrecht's second trade secret. Suffice it to 
say that he introduced this wine at the instance of Dr. 
Spencer Wells, . as a kind of compromise between the Malaga, 
which was generally considered too sweet, and the Burgundy , 
which found some objectors on the score of tartness of taste. 
Next to the " medium " wine, Burgundy is the grade most 
requently asked for; then follow, "in order of importance, 
Malaga, sherry, and port. The demand for the champagne 
fluctuates very considerably. This wine requires a longer 
time to mature than any of the others, nine months being the 
period usually allotted to the manufacture of a batch of 
champagne. It is the only wine on Mr. Armbrecht's list which 
is not entirely prepared at Lake Street, as for obvious reasons 



60 



April lb, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



-3 





the coca preparation must be added on the spot. Hence Mr. 
Atmbrecht supplies his agent at Kheirns with coca extract, 
which is added to the champagne when it is liqueured. The 
extract is added to the brandy and sugar of which the liqueur 
is composed, and the whole injected into the bottle 
by a machine which simultaneously corks the cham- 
pagne. 

Asked whether the recent advance in the price of glass 
bottles had not put him to a sensible loss, Mr. Armbrecht 
replied that, thus far. such had not been the case. He made 
his contracts for bottles for a considerable time in advance, 
buying 1,000 gross at a time. The coca-wine bottles are 
manufactured at Neusattel-Elbogen, in Bohemia, by a brother 
of Mr. Siemens, the celebrated electrician. They are shipped 
from the works down the Elbe, packed loose in vessel in 
Hamburg, and taken to Messrs. Siemens' warehouse at Poplar, 
where they are washed. One thousand gross, Mr. Armbrecht 
told us, last him, at the present rate of sale of his wine, for 
eight or nine months ; and from these data the total annual 
" output " of Armbrecht's coca wine may be readily calculated 
according to Cocker by the aspiring arithmetician. Messrs. 
Siemens undertook not to raise the price for his last contract 
provided he would allow them to execute it in the winter, when 
work is slack and labour less pretentious. Mr. Armbrecht, in 
his present close quarters, is put to a considerable trouble in 
handling the big 115 gallon pipes in which he receives a great 
part of his wine. These unwieldy casks, however, possess 
the advantage, in the first place, of being comparatively 
cheaper than the hogsheads ; and, secondly, of yielding a 



better wine owing to the diminished area of contact of the 
liquid with the wood. A man and a boy, in the course of a 
ten-hours working-day, bottle, cork, and pack into bins 4 
hogsheads, or about 1,300 bottles, of wine between them. In 
ordinary seasons a stock of 50 hogsheads of prepared wine is 
generally kept, but during the spring and autumn months, 
when the sales are largest, it is often found impossible to keep 
so large a reserve. Burgundy and Malaga wine are left to 
mature for a much longer period than the " medium " grade, 
and Mr. Armbrecht showed us one cellar stowed with the 
former varieties, which have been bottled since the month of 
November. 

Asked where his principal trade lay, we were told by Mr. 
Armbrecht that he has some very good customers among 
pharmacists, though most of them buy through the inter- 
mediary of wholesale houses ; but certain inducements are 
offered to chemists who buy straight from him. He does not 
supply the Stores directly. With his export business he is 
well satisfied. The week before our representative called 
some very satisfactory orders had been received from British 
India and Australia, and in Canada and the States the wine 
was beginning to make its way to some extent, partly in con- 
sequence of its introduction on board of the Cunard liners. 
Mr. Armbrecht commenced business as a pharmacist in Ryder 
Street, St. James's, in 18G2, thence he removed to No. 23, 
and afterwards to his present quarters at 2 Duke Street, 
Grosvenor Square. No. 5 Duke Street, now in course of 
erection, is to be the future home of the coca wine and its 
enterprising originator. 



Note bv G. T. A. — To-day, April 15th, the stock mentioned above, as seen by the town traveller, has all been bottled and 
packed, and mostly disposed of. Our stock this day is 15 pipes each 115 gallons and 30 hogsheads each 58 gallons, which 
will be ready for bottling in about three weeks' time, and will furnish a further stook of 3,450 gallons, liacb gallon gives 
us eight pint-bottles of 20 ounces— In all 27,600 bottles— a stock which will carry us over June. 



57 



30 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



RMBR IE CUT 



[This Illustration represents the EXACT SIZE of the 4s. 6d. Bottle.] 



ARMBRECHT 



(MEDIUM.) 



A powerful nerve stimulant. . Eesfores the fond- 
tionB of the digestive organs, strengthens the' mental 
and physical powers, assuages thirst, relieves the dul- 
ness and drowsiness of nervous debility. Given with 
benefit in cases of opium and morphia habit. 

Tho North Am. Mod. CMr. Review, March, 1880, 
has the following : -'" In large quantities it ia said 
that -this- drug produces a general exaltation of the 
oirculatory and nervous systems— imparting inoreaaed 
rigour to the muscles as well as to the intellect, with 
an indescribable feeling of satisfaction." 

In small doses it increases appetite and promotes 
digestion. In cases of sleeplessness from exhaustion 
and fatigue it is invaluable, producing a sound and 
refreshing sleep without the distressing sensations so 
common after OPIATES, BROMIDES, and HYDEATE 
OF CHLORAL. 
One wine-glassful is equal to one dram of the leave* 

DOSE, AS A TO NIC. -One wine-glassful be- 
fore or with each meal- Children, half or quarter of » 

wine-glassful. 

FOR SLEEPLESSNESS FROM NERVOUS 

EXHAUSriON.-Place a wine-glassful at the bed- 
side, and take a sip about every half hour until asleep, 
or take the whole at one dose, and repeat during the 
night if wakeful. _ 



AGENTS, 



ARMBRECHT, NELSON & CO., 

Continental Pharmacy, Established 1868, 
Telegraph Address " ARMBRECHT," LONDON, 
2, DUKE STREET, 

GROSVENOR SQUARE, LONDON, W. 



9 




"Several preparations of Coca Wine have been 
placed before the public, but we unhesitatingly accord 
to the above the first place. Their Coca Wine is more 
suited to the English [palate than some of the conti- 
nental preparations, which are too sweet to be palat- 
able, and which destroy their otherwise tonic and 
invigorating qualities by deranging the digestive 
system or creating nausea. The value of Coca Wine 
in conditions of debility is too weU recognised to re- 
quire comment, and we need do no more than say 
that, after a very careful trial of Messrs. Armbrecht, 
Nelson & Co.'s Wine, we can speak most highly of it 
as a sound and invigorating tonic, and can recommend 
it most unhesitatingly." — Journal of Laryngology and 
Rhinology. 



For Order List, see Page 59 (bottom folio). 



Handbills, Show Cards, dc, Free on Application. 



2, 3, & 4 DUKE STREET, GROSVENOR SQUARE, LONDON. 



68 



Apiul IS, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



31 



RETAIL PRICES. 



& ORDER SHEET. 



jS 



IM Flu* 

FCROTIAH COCA[ 

utm 

(MUTHFOXTLON COCA) j 

A POWERFOL TOJIC 



bout Mill MlMf. I 

UUDEICHT JtLSOIiC. ; 

Cwilmrntal ^mnii(j, j 

« DC CX STREET j 



Doz. 



Wholesale. 

36/ .. 

36/ .. 
36/ 

36/ .. 

36/ ., 

, 46/6 ., 

26/6 .. 

. 31/6 .. 

. 49/6 .. 

. 13/6 .. 

... 22/6 . 

Pamphlets for Distribution — No Charge, 



To 



Coca Medium 
Coca Burgundy 
Coca Malaga 
Coca Port 
Coca Sherry 
Coca Champagne 

Coca Wine Extract 

Coca Lozenges 



Imperial Pints 



Quarts 
Pints 
Bottles 
» 

Box 
Tin 



£ 



8. 



d. 



Address 



SPECIAL PRICE ON GROSS LOTS. 

Messrs. AEMBEEOHT, NELSON $ 00., 

2 Duke Street, Orosvenor Square, London, W. 



If order be sent to us direct and remittance enclosed, we offer a discount of 2£ per cent, single dozen (not 
less) and 5 per cent, on 3 dozen lots ; carriage paid England and Wales, and half Scotland and Ireland. 



69 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Atkil 18, 1891 




COCA \N\tC. 



ARMBRECHT K f 

COCA WINE! 



(MEDIUM.) 



i fwerful nsne stimulant. Rostorss the fces- 
Pf ''^» <J!gt-.tTe organs, strenirlbeui the anal 
!*j Pencil powers, W yi|M thirsty -sli™ Hi W 
Snd drowsiness of nerTaaj dsbilitj. 0i™ »l» 
n? V" ° f opium and morphia habit. 

Jta Nortl^ Aa- Mod. Ghir. B«7l«T,Ma>th. 188C 
K™.l*»wing:-".lB large quu,MtiM.a ~ «* 
™ or"f produces a general exaltation of * 
™™»«J ana nervous- ejslems-irnpatting Inonwd 
WW 10 ibi buhIm-u well as lo tba inulleot, "» 
" "* acn j»M«f«ehor. of satisfaction.' 

«oa» it increasoa np(eliK and prcnow 
FTOu. In cases of sleeplessness from sjhsmUM 
riL? 8511 " '"oltiable, produoing a sound eni 
E5?*. ,U, i * ,lb »"' '»« distreitine aenaa'. ^Ji 
W CHLOBdL UTES ' BE0MIDI:8 ' ui HIW 

°" "M-f Ussful is e qual to one dmm of tie lss» 
h°°$*; *S A TONIC.^Joowine-glssiM* 

*»*-eir«fu** ch n ** 1 ' om ' 6 "' balf 
^SLEEPLESSNESS FROM NERVOUS 
>1 , *^ ST| ON.-Plnoe a wine-glassful at tie bad- 
,, J™ •«'• « sip about eterj half hour until sill* 
toll i ! " h ° l0 " oooaose. and repeat dui»l <" 
■g J wiseful. 

'GEensT 3 == ™ 

*RMBRECHT, NELSON & CO, 

wntinental Pharmacy. Established 1068. 
""piphAddress-ARMBRECHT/'LOfVPON' 
Mn „ 2, DUKE STREET, 
^°SVENOR SQUARE, LONDON. 



4 6a bottle ; 48/- per doz. 

ORDER SHEET, sec page 59 
(bottom folio). 



BURR0U6HS,WELLC0ME & CR 

LIB^ A HT 

No DYSPEPSIA. 



" Daily "E"xPRESS,""DuBtiS, January 



Sib, — In answer to your correspondent "Dyspepsia's" letter in your issue of 
the 31st December, under the heading " A Plea for Luncheon," I would recom- 
mend him and his fellow-sufferers to provide themselves with a bottle of Messrs. 
Armbrecht, Nelson, & Co.'s coca wine, keep it in their desks, and take a half or 
a whole wineglass of it in the middle of the day with their " few slices of bread 
and butter." They will find that a small amount of this very pleasant and 
invaluable preparation will remove the sense of fstlgue, satisfy the craving for 
food, and assuage thirst. For those bank officials and city clerks who are total 
abstainers, and might object to the use of wine, even as a medicine, Messrs. 
Armbrecht prepare coca extract and coca lozenges. They are all prepared from 
the leaves of erythroxylon coca, a small shrub which grows in South America, 
and has been known and appreciated by the natives of that country from the 
earliest times. The Indians will pass the whole day working or travelling, sus- 
tained solely by coca, but eating freely in the evening. The natives working in 
the mines derive such sustenance from chewing these leaves that they frequently 
take no food for four or five days, though constantly working, and with a good 
supply of coca they feel neither hunger, thirst, nor fatigue ; and without incon- 
venience or injury they could remain eight or ten days without sleep. 

Mr. Markham, in his " Peruvian Barks," says : " I chewed coca, not constantly, 
but very frequently, and, besides the agreeable, soothing feeling it produced, I 
found I could endure long abstinence from food with less inconvenience than I 
should otherwise have felt; and it enabled me to ascend precipitous mountain 
sides with a feeling of lightness and elasticity, and without losing breath. ' : 

I will not trespass further on your valuable space, but will content myself by 
saying that the sample bottle Messrs. Armbrecht were kind enough to send me I 
gave to my wife, who was suffering from nervous debility, exhaustion, and 
insomnia, the result of a painful complication of diseases, necessitating her 
remaining in bed over two months. In her case, the only one I have had an 
opportunity of trying it in, it acted as a charm, strengthening, soothing, and 
producing a feeling of complete restf ulness, and inducing sound and refreshing 
sleep. Messrs. Armbrecht, Nelson, & Co.'s address is 2 Duke Street, Grosvenor 
Square, London, W. They supply clergymen and medical men with samples free, 
and pay postage on bottles ordered. The price for a large bottle is 5«. Their 
Agents in Armagh are W. Couser, 4 English Street. — Louth : Lucas and Wal- 
kington. Trusting these remarks may prove of use to " Dyspepsia," et 7wc genus 
ovine, 

I am, Sir, yours faithfully, 

L.R.C.S.I., M.K.Q.C.P.I., &c. 

15 Ness Bank, Inverness, N.B. 
January 3rd, 1890. 



MESSRS. ARMBRECHT, NELSON & CO, 

2, 3, 4 Duke St. , Grosvenor Square, London. 



60 



April 13, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



33 



THE FUTURE HOME OF COCA WINE (ARMBRECHT . 




Nos. 5 & G DUKE STKEET, GHOSVENOK SQUARE (in progress of building l, to which the business 

will bo removed in the early part of 1802. 



81 



3t THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST April 18, 1891 




LABORATORIES AND DRUG MILLS COVENTRY. BIRMINGHAM BRANCH HOUSE. 



WYLEYS & CO. 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS, 

TJGlbolesale ©ruQgtsts, 

AND 

DRUG GRINDERS. 

WAREHOUSES, LABORATORIES, AND DRUG MILLS, 




BRANCH HOUSE, 

52 MOOR STREET, BIRMINGHAM. 

MontMj "PRICES CURRENT" post free on applsalion. 



62 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



35 



|i| V| CVC 9g 1*11 MANUFACTURING 
If I LC I V Qb UUi CHEMISTS. 

Standardized Preparations of the British Pharmacopoeia. 
Extracts — Solid and Liquid, Brit. Pharm. 

Sp. iEther. Nit P.B. (Maximum amount of Citrous Ether.) 

Sp. Ammon. Aromat. P.B. 

Tinctures, Brit. Pharm. 
Plaisters Brit. Pharm., in Rolls. 
Syrups, Brit. Pharm. 

Syr. Ferri Phosph. Co., and other Chemical Syrups. 

Granular Effervescent Preparations— Brit. Pharm. 
Granular and Fruit Citrates. 
Distilled and Concentrated Waters. 
Concentrated Decoctions and Infusions. 
Gelatine Coated Oval Pills. 
Pearl Coated Pills. 
Pessaries, Suppositories, and Bougies. 
Patent Duraplastic Horse Balls. 
Compressed Pellets. 
Disintegrating Pellets. 
Finely Powdered Drugs (own Grinding). 

ALL PREPARATIONS SOLD UNDER GUARANTEE AS TO STRENGTH AND PURITY. 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 189i 




Crescent wL.. Brand 



BICARBONATE OF SODA, 

REFINED AND REGRYSTALLIZED. 

PURE AND CHEAP: 
ANALYSIS. 

Bicarbonate of Soda ... ... ... ... 97*20 

Mono Carbonate of Soda ... i'90 

Sulphate of Soda ... _ _ . • . ... trace 

Chloride of Sodium ., — "035 

Moisture _ ... ... '82 

Insoluble ... ... ... ... ... ... nil 



PURE ALKALI, 

GUARANTEED 68 DEGREES, 
EQUAL TO 98 PER CENT. OF CARBONATE OF SODA. 

Most economical form of Soda for the use of Printer?, 
Bleachers, Dyers ; Glass, Paper, and Soap Makers. 



SODA CRYSTALS 

OF TUB FINEST QUALITY. 



BRUNNER, MOND & CO., LIM, 

Manufacturers of Soda by the Ammonia Process 
(Solvay's <£* Monti's Patents), 

NORTHWICH, CHESHIRE. 

. 64 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



37 





Lloyd's Llice st erc 



for PURITY, 

PERMANENCE, and 
SOLUBILITY 

These Pills CANNOT be Surpassed. 



oiifBLE Pearl Coated Pills 



Special Quotations for Large Quantities. 

RETAIL CHEMISTS OFFERED SPECIAL ADVA NTAGES FOR CASH. 

Private Formula carefully prepared. A Complete list forwarded upon application. 

Mr. T. HOWARD LLOYD (18 years partner in the firm of John 
Richardson & Co., Leicester) begs to inform the Trade that he is now carrying 
on business at the following address. 

Having for many years devoted much attention to the perfecting of the Soluble 
Pearl Coating for Pills, he will personally supervise this branch of the business, 
and, having procured a complete plant of entirely new machinery, with the latest 
improvements, is in a position to produce the same in the highest state of perfection. 



T, HOWARD LLOYD & GO. 

Wholesale Druggists & Manufacturing Chemists, 

HIGH STREET & TOWNHALL LANE, LEICESTER 



38 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 




V 

if* 
I 



Embracing the Therapeutic Properties of the COCA Plant, blended with the best Madeira. 
COCA FOR TROUBLESOME THROATS. 

Testimony is not wanting from specialists in diseases of the. tbroat, and dramatic and 1; ric artists, to show that Coca has 
a wonderfully invigorating effect upon the voice. The preparation in most common use is the Wine of Coca, which, in order 
to yield the characteristic effect, must be made " upon honour." To be of any decided value it must be made from the 
Coca leaves. Very much of the Coca Wine on the market is merely a solution of Cocaine, which cannot be too severely 
condemned. Hence, those with troublesome throats who desire to use this tonic should be exceedingly careful in purchasing, 

patronising dealers only of known reliability. 

The YINACOCA Is carefully prepared from the best Coca Leaf only. (No addition of Cocaine.) 

AifT mm 0NE WINE CHOICE MADEIRA)} 

flNli Y 0NE QUAL,TY A1) THE BEST & CHEAPEST ON THE MARKET. 

Villi 1 ONE PRICE J 

VINA COCA is a direct stimulant of the most active hi nd, supporting life in a manner almost miraculous, without dis- 
turbance of the vital functions. Foi the voice, a wineglassful before any ordeal is sufficient. Its effect upon the vocal 
cords is surprising, and of great value to Public Speakers, Professional and other Singers, and Lecturers. 

Sold in Bottles at 3s. 6d. each, or 40s. per dozen, Retail. Usual Trade Discount. 

Pamphlets for distribution, carriage paid. 
COCA is prepared in various forms : COCA LOZENGES, COCA TABLETS, COCA ELIXIR, COCA 
TEA, COCA CHOCOLATE, STAMIN (Coca and Beef Extract), COCA TOBACCO, &c. 

FULL PARTICULARS FRJM 

THE FRENCH HYGIENIC SOCIETY, 

0 CONDUIT STREET, REGENT STREET, LONDON, W. 



WITHOUT A RIVAL! 



From the time Medicine was first discovered by the Ancients down to 
the present none ever made such progress as 

BEECHAM'S PILLS. 

They stand without a rival, and have by far the largest 
sale of any Patent Medicine in the "World. This is a 
fact which every business man is bound to admit. 

All Foreign Dealers will find BEECHAM'S PILLS the 

most Saleable Medicine in the Market. 
The health- restoring and life-giving properties of these 
Pills are such as to increase their demand every yaer. 

The words "BEECHAM'S PILLS, SAINT HELENS," 

are on the Government Stamp affixed to each box. 

Prepared only and sold by the Proprietor, THOMAS BEECHAJt, 
ST. HELENS, LANCASHIRE, ENGLAND, in boxes at Is. I d. and 2s. 9d. 
each, with full instructions for use. 

66 




April 18, 1891 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



39 



London International and Universal Exhibition, 1884, Gold Medal Awarded for our Pharmaceutical Preparation!. 
Calcutta Exhibition, First-olass Certificate and Two Prize Medals Awarded for our Pharmaceutical Preparations. 

LIQUOR SANTAL FLAV.c. BDCHDetGDBEBA 

THE ORIGINAL PREPARATION. 
Price (in England) 10s. ed. per pound, paoked ( for Dispensing only ) in 10-oz., 22-os., 

40 -oz., and 90-ob. Bottles. 



HEWLETT'S "PERMANENT" LIQUOR FERRI IODIDI. 

LIQUOR EASTONI (HEWLETT'S). 

SYRUP EASTONI (HEWLETT'S). 
PHOSPHORISED COD LIVER OIL EMULSION (HEWLETT'S). 



CT HfiWTETT J& QAM manufacturing chemists, TAirn am n n 
. (J. flLnlilUl 6L OUfl, 40, 41, & 42 CHARLOTTE ST., LUHJJUrlj D.L 

ESTABLISHED 1832. 

Phyttmen* will oblige, when ordering Liq. Santeti Flav. cum Buehu et Cubebd, by writing " Liquor Santal Flax, e. Bueh* 

at Cubebd (Xewlett't)." 

London International and Universal Exhibition, 1884, Gold Medal Awarded for our Pharmaceutical Preparation*. 
Calcutta Exhibition, First-class Certificate and Two Prize Medals Awarded for our Pharmaceutical Preparations , 

HEWLETT'S 

HIST. PEPSINS CO. C. BISMUTHO. 

Highly recommended in various forms of dyspepsia, having a direct action upon the mucous membrane of the stomach and 
intestines as a sedative. It can be administered with marked and almost instantaneous effect in the irritative form of dyspepsia 
more especially when pyrosit is a conspicuous symptom, and pain occurs an hour or more after food. In simple neuralgic gastric 
pain following eating, occurring in feeble subjects, it is especially indicated, and even in carcinoma, it has been used with great 
success in alleviating pain and vomiting. 

In the dyspepsia of patients dependent upon some organic disease, and where there is a decided loss of nerve power, it is 
of singular service. Thus, for instance, a person after a meal complains of a peculiar gnawing and emptiness, with slight pain 
at the epigastrium, evident signs of general relaxation and loss of nerve power, clinical experience haB shown that it is of great 
service as a tonic and stomachic. A portion of its value arises, it may be, from its action upon the spinal motor nerve centres. 
Be these things as they may, experience has abundantly demonstrated the value of the compound as a stomachic, anti-dyspeptic, 
and tonic, in general functional atony and relaxation, and in the various forms of dyspepsia, constipation, or diarrhoea, connected 
with atony of the visceral muscular coat, the Mist. Pepsinae Co. c. Bismutho is a very valuable remedy. In the exkauttimg 
purging of Phthitii, accompanied with night sweats and restlessness, Dr. Mathews, of Nantwich, has used it with marked and 
appreciable effect price (in England) 10s . 6cL POT pound. 

Physiciana will oblige, when ordering Mist. Pepsinas Co. c. Bismutho, by writing Mist. Pepsinas Co. (Hewlett's), 
Faoked (for Dispensing only) in 10-oz., 22-oz., 40-oz., and 90-oz. Bottles. 

LOHSTIDOIISr zmhezdio^il record report. 

MISTUBA PEPSINJB C0MP08ITA CUM BISMUTHO. 
" This combination of Megan. Hiwijitt is one whioh has been extensively tested, and with good results. It Is Justly popular In ths 
profession as a very valuable and effective combination. It serves not only to Improvo apepsia, but to lessen the gastrio pain and >e 
facilitate difficult and painful digestion, without setting up any evils of its own. It Is a very good orutoh for persons of weak stomMA 
to lean on."— January loth, 1881, 

O. J. HEWLETT «Sb SON, 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS, 

40 41 A 42 CHARLOTTE STREET. LONDON, E.C. [Established 1882. 



, 67 



40 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April 18, 1891 



NEW SOUTH WALES 



THE AUSTRALIAN DRUG CD., UNI., 



QQ 




















ft. 








OS 




53 




UJ 




=3 




% 




Q= 








CS 




U. 








0= 


oo 


•> 


oo 
Q 


UJ 


UJ 




Q. 






o 








o 






o 


C3 
Uj 


NT8, 


8P( 








55 




Ul 


oo 
a. 




oo 


:=> 


^ 




oc 
h» 


o 


<UJ 




oo 


K. 




oo 






ND 


% 


\0N\ 








o 


OO 


— 1 


u. 


oo 
Q= 




ICA 




















PGR 




=> 

OS 














a: 
o 

O 

cs 

=0 

a: 



a: 
m 

5 - 



* § 

a*. ~H 

Cs rn 

a: * 

CO =5 



CO 



rn 

=3 



00 



CO =0 

o m 

Si 

CO 

f2 * 

rn 
% 

CO 



Wholesale Druggists, 1 9 & 21 O'Con nell Street, SYDNEY. 

Agencies for Patent Medicines and other Goods solicited. Travellers cover New South Wales and Queensland. 

London Agents : LATJ&HLAO, MACKAY & BAKER, 50 lime Street, B.C. 

NBW SOUTH WAXES. 

W. H. SOUL & Co. 




7 DOOHB FHOM KINO 8TBEET. 
68 



Hos. 168, 160, 162,4268 
PITT STREET, 

SYDNEY, N.S.W. 

Will be pleased to 
fill any lines from their 
large Stock, which the 
Trade may be unable 
"to obtain from their 
usual Jobbers. 

TEMS CASH. 



W. H. 8. A Co. can arrange 
with pushing Houses to receive 
u Goods on Commission for 
prompt Sale in this Colony. 




4 DOOB8 FHOM PABK STREET. 



April 18. 1891 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 4t 




ESTABIjI^HED 1870, 

P OSSER, TAYLOR & CO. 

(LATE BERKLEY, TAYLOB & CO.). 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND IMPORTERS. 

AND 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS 

BRISBANE, QUEENSLAND. 

CONTRACTORS TO THE QUEENSLAND GOVERNMENT. 
Importers of Drugs, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries, Patent Medicines 
and Perfumery; Surgical Instruments, Photographic Sundries, Confectioners' 
and Dyers' Goods, Dental Sundries, Soda Water Machinery, Bottling Racks, 
Egg-shape and Lamont's Soda Water Bottles, Corks, Essences, Labels, and 

all Cordial Makers' Requirements. 

All parts of Queensland visited at regular Intervals by experienced Travellers. 
Agencies solicited from Firms who are prepared to actively introduce their Manufactures into the Colony. 

MESSRS. LAU&HLAND, MaCKAT & BAKER, 50 LIME STREET, E.C. 



69 



42 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST April 18, 1891 

VICTORIA. 

ROCKE, TOfflPSITT & CO., 
WHOLESALE D RUG GIST S, 

MELBOURNE, 

AND 

119 & 120 LONDON WAL L, E.G. 

Samples and Quotations solicited. Agencies undertaken on the most advantageous terms, 

Wholesale Depot for Sander & Son's Pure Volatile Eucalyptus OH (Encaiyptol), and Importers of Oil of Eucalyptus. 

Wholesale Agents— Messrs. Hodgkinson, Frestons & King, 81 Bishopsgate Street Without, E.C. 

JULIUS LEVY, 

Wholesale Druggist & Sundryman, 316 Flinders St., Melbourne, & Charlotte Place, Sydney. 

AGENT FOR 

HEINRICH HAENSEL — Olea aetherea sine terpeno. 
DE. MERCK — Alealoids and Glucosides. 

GUSTAV LOH8E — Lily of the Valley Perfumery and Superior Toilet Soaps. 
ROBERT FRERE S — Triple Extraits and Olive OiJ. 

STEVENSON & HOWELL — Special Belfast Flavour, Gum Foam, &e. &c. 
W. TOOGOOD — W.-Brand of Dispensing Bottles and Chemists' Sundries. 
Correspondence invited and should be addressed to Charlotte Place, Sydney. Special facilities for introducing new lines. 

B. G. LENNON & CO., ^I^SS! 

LENNON & TEBB, CAPE TOWN, 

Wholesale Druggists & Druggists' Sundriesmen 

LONDON OFFICE! B. G. LENNON & CO., 14 BUNHILL ROW, E.C. 

AGENCEES UNDERTAKEN. 

FELTON, GRIMWADE & CO., 

Wholesale Druggists and Manufacturing Chemists,' 
MELBOURNE, VICTORIA. 

LONDON AGENTS:— 

Messrs. &BJMWADJ5, BIDLEY ft CO., Mildmay Chambers, 82 Bishopsgate Street 

Wholesale Affentn for Boslsto's Genuine Oil ©F Eucalyptus. 

70 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



43 



NEW ZEALAND. 



KEMPTHORNE, PROSSER & 00., 
IIW ZEALAND DR06 COMPANY, Imm 

"Wholesale Druggists, 
MANUFACTURES CHEMISTS, AND COMMISSION iERCHANTS, 

Head Office and Factory, DTJNEDXN. 

BRANCH HOUSES: ] 
High Street, CHRISTCHURChJ 
Hunter Street, WELLINGTON, 
Shortland Sti'eet, AUCKLAND, 

Patent and Proprietary Medicines Agency. I HEW ZEALAHD. 




London Agents— 

lessrs. 6EIMWADE, RIDLEY ft Oo., 82 Bishopsgate Street. 



W ~\f Our Extra Steam Refined quality is in firm, hard, dry, and snowy-white crystals, entirely free from oily contamination, and 

M S M ^^^^^ ^_ _ « m „_ therefore of the highest melting point. As the original and largest 

^■b ^MK ^F^^ W ^^W* B ■ jS^Sk. h manufacturers in the world of th« true Japan Menthol, we guarantee 

tr^ La^ I l^r V B v V I our oran ^ t0 be absolutely pure. Beware of substitutes. For full 

Aj A (A M / 1 ^§ M MM ^ W M A particulars, therapeutic uses, etc., see special circulars, to be had on 

\S» m m Am A MA Mai application. 

Our Extra Steam Refined ^ 0 f a t arxv an <j resinous nature whioh are objected to by some consumers are extracted. It is of water- 
Oil is trebly distilled and ^^gr ^ white colour, retaining its 

twice rectified by steam, by ] A M*^| ^^^^ W""^ W *f V H ff f M I VVI full aroma, pungency, and 

an entirely new process and AAT^ E_J * W I W W i * t— ^ |\/B I TV I ' I " strength, aud guaranteed 

in apparatus of our own W*"^ * W*^ fT^ M^ 4 Mm IV 1 1 1 ^1 M absolutely pure and soluble 

invention, by which all -M (f- M\ flLiaffl i 1111 111 A in spirits ol wine, 
these polymeric products 



Yo Cn ma COCKING & CO. Ert sr d 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS, 




AND MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS. mftmlfaetnre of the Solid Camphor of Commerce.. Our brand i. 

OTHER SPECIALITIES : guaranteed to be the natural oil, and not the fictitious mixture of 

refuse Camphor and Turpentine generally sold. Having mada a 
Cod Liver, Fish and Orange Oils, Vegetable Wax and Isinglass, gp^i study of its manufacture, we have succeeded in producing 

Vonmy Mart* Report ana Mai, Circular, on appUca.ion. ' '^^AW^-SlS 

LONDON AGENTS— SPIES BROS. & CO., 106 Fenchurch Street, article for the use of the essential -oil distiller. 



Telegram Address-" COCKING YOKOHAMA.' 










xc 

o x x> 

AND 

SALICYLATE J3 



PHYSI0L08ICALLY PURE] manufaottjbed under kolbe's process bt [PHYSIOLOGICALLY PURE 

J. HAUPP, FEUERBACH - STUTTGART. 

To be obtained from the Sole Agents. N.B.— Stock kept In London. 

CI ICDCT QDHC 17 PHILPOT LANE, LONDON, E.C. 

P | \ | [j f\ \J^y m m Telegrams-" FUKRST LONDON." Telephone No. 1050. 

' 71 



44 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



April is, 1891 



INDIA. 



PEAKE, ALLEN & CO. 



CHEMISTS, DRUGGISTS, 

AND 

GENERAL MERCHANTS, 

LUCKNOW, OUDHp INDIA, 

Possess exceptional facilities for the 
introduction of NEW SPECIALITIES 
Patent Medicines, Druggists' Sundries, 
Perfumery, Ac. 

FREDK. BOEHM, 

Billiter Square Buildings, LONDON. 

BELGIAN CAMOMILE FLOWERS. 
GERMAN BOTANIC DRUGS. 
SAFFRON. CELATINE. 
SUGAR OF MILK. 
ALCOHOL. ETHER. CHLOROFORM. 

CHLOROPHYLL. TALC. 
Medicinal CASTOR OIL, French. 



UNITED STATES. 



B. KEITH & GO, 



MANUFACTURERS Of 



PURE CONCENTRATED 
MEDICINES, 

CONCENTRA TED TINCT URES, ETC. 

We make a full line of EESINOID8, such 
as PODOPHYLLUM, LEPTANDBIN, ETTONY- 
MIN, IRISIN, HYDRASTIS, &c, ALL PURE. 

Bo- called Concentrations are in the market, called by the same name ai 
manufactures, that are made by triturating extracts etc., with sagar 
of milk, powdered root, eto 

WHAT ABE CONCENTRATED TINCTURES ? 

They are not made from the crude material, but by dissolving th* 
active prinoiples in Alcohol in definite proportions, and 
Invariably represent a uniform amount of therapeutic power. 



Seed for printed matter on CON, TINCT. AVENA SATIVA in ihi 
Morphia or Opium Habit, and certificates from different members of ths 
Medical Profession, citing oases under their charge, treated by it; alas 
RHVIBHD AND ENLARGED MANUAL ; also Price Lists, to 

B. KEITH & CO., 

75 WILLIAM STREET NEW YORK. U.8.A. 



HAMBRO SPECKLED 



LEECHES! 

Warranted Healthy, Wholesale 
and for Exportation. Direat 
from Marshes. 

FITCH & MOTTIMHAM, 

TRADE MARX Lkech Breeders, 

registered. * CMONBURY SQUARE, L0ND0I, I, 

4i. uratrs by Post receive immediate attention. 




HOLLOWAY'S PILLS & OINTMENT 

Have the Largest Sale of any Medicine in the World. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY AT 

Professor HOLLOWAY'S Establishment 

78 New Oxford St. (Me 633 Oxford St.), London, 
And sold at 1j. ljd., 2s. 9d., 4<. bX, lit., 22s., and 33i. each Bex er Pet. 

Chemists and Druggists selling " Holloway's Fills and Ointment " ean 
•n application to the above address, or to the Wholesale House with whom 
they deal, be supplied free of charge with Handbills and Pesters with their 
name and address printed at foot. 
Wholesale Termi tee List of " Proprietary Articles " in molt Price Currents. 



W. EDWARDS & SON, 

157 QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, LONDON, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT DEALERS IN 

Patent Medicines and Proprietary Articles, 

ENGLISH, AMERICAN, FRENCH, &e. 

SOLE AGENTS for ROCHE'S HERBAL EMBROCATION, 

Burohell's Anodyne Necklaces, Ford's Balsam of Horehotmd, Widow Welch's Pills, by Mrs. SmitherB 
Oxley'B Essence Ginger, and the preparations of Messrs. Hudson & Son, late of the Haymarket, London. 

PRICE LISTS SENT ON APPLICATION. ORDERS CAREFULLY AND PROMPTLY EXECUTED. 

72 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGG-IST 
HPPMtnor 



xtvn 



EVANS, LESCHER & WEBB 




Toe Board of Inland 
Revenue being ot opinion 
that Oascara-Hawley re- 
quires to be stamped.eacb. 
box will in future bear 
its proper (llrf. and 6<7.) 
■tamp. 



Savars Onbcb Cigarettes 
do not require this. 



wholesale: 

PRICES.! 

Cascara-Hawley. 

Is. lhl. box, 
10s. per doz. 

4j. 6rf. box, 
40s. per doz. 

Savars Cubob 
Cigarettes, 

9s. and 24s. 
per doz. 



SPECIAL OFFER, — Handsome Bronzed Counter Stand, packed in box, completely fitted as above, at 5s. 

net. Contents sell at 8s. lOAd., being advertised and really good, they sell quickly : this attractive Stand 
will quadruple sales. 

LIMITS.-On account of cost, only one or two can be supplied to one Druggist, and orders are executed in turn. 
TAKING BACK.— If in 12 months contents remain all unsold we will take it back and allow 7s.: this 
secures our friends against any loss. 
EVANS, LESCHER & WEBB, LONDON. I EVANS, SONS & CO., LIVERPOOL. 



ORDER-SLIP, TO BE TORN OFF AND SENT AS AN ORDER. 
Messrs. Evans, Lescher & Webb, 60 Bartholomew Cose, London (or) Messrs. Evans, Sons & Co., 56 Hanover St., Liverpool. 

riease send me one (or two) Bronzed Counter Standi", fitted with Oiidrfira-TTawlcy, Sto., fit 5s. each. (To bo taken back at 7.<. in ft year's tlino, 

i( none of contents sold ) 

Y -i. ■ .. . Xam' » 

Adilreu 

Hon to ht tent 



73 



xxvin 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

II'I'PLIIHIIIT 



April 18, 1891 



" WARRINGTON " CHLOROFORM. 

(PATENT 8523.1 

MANUFACTURED FROM KETONES. 



Notice.— Complaints bavirg reached the manufacturers lhat when Chloroform (Warrington Brand) is ordered 
substitute* are recommended and tried on, we have to caution the trade that 

ACETONE CHLOROFORM IS NOT "WARRINGTON" CHLOROFORM, 

And, as bujers, to see that the bottles bear the Registered Label and Protective Bands of the Company, also the signature 
of the Warringtcn Chemical Co., which is registered as a Trade Mark, and without which we cannot guarantee the 

article to be genuine. 

Sole Manufacturers, WARRINGTON CHEMICAL CO., Warrington, Lancashire, & 46 Jewin St., London, EX. 

All inquiries and orders to be addressed to London. 

PEPSALIA 



6. & B, STERN, 62 GRAY'S INN ROAD, LONDON, W.C, 



AND 



PUMILINE 



TOWLES CHLORODYNE 



In COUGHS, ASTHMA. BBONCHITIS, INFLU- 
ENZA, &o., its effects are truly wonderful, immediately relieving tbe 
tightness of the Chest, allaying irritation of the throat, promoting Expec- 
toration, and speedily and effectually snbduin? the Cough. 

It soothes the weary achiDg of CONSUMP1 ION. relieves the 
harassing Congh, and olten prevents those sleepless nights so trying to 
the sufferer. 

In CHOLERA, DIARRHCEA, DYSENTERY, <fcc, it h»s 
proved itself a most valuable BpeciUc. quickly rtlievinif the pain and 
spasms, and seldom failing to check the disease ; for which property, as 
w»)l as for its value in Sea Siekness (for which it is the best remedy 
known), it should be au indispensable article in every emigrant's outfit. 



TESTIMONIALS, 
"Superior to every other I have tried." 

F. H. Gkeew, M.R.C.S. 

Rochdale Dispcnsa y. 

"Peculiarly serviceable in Bronchial, 
Spasmodic, and Neuraljric Affections." 

Alkiibu A8PLAND. F.R.O S , 
Consulting Snrgeon lo Ashlon Infirmary. 

"I have used it largelv in Spasmodic 
and Painful Affections. Bronchitis, and 
Neuralgia. It baa the property of belug 
readily combinable in ordinary pre«crip- 
tiona— an advantage over all similar 
preparations." — 

B. Tuaffoiid Whitehead, M.E.C.S. 

A Surgeon writes :— " In Diarrhea*, 
Colic, Ague, Spasms, I have found it re- 
lieve more pain and cause more joy th>n 
any other article that ran be named. 
Has proved itself a specific against eea- 

sickneis." 

" Island Bridge, Dublin. 

" I am pleased to say that although I 
have not finished a quarter of the bottle 
'2>. 9d.) tbe rain has left my chest, and 
the congh is almost well.*'— J. Bnowjf. 

74 



Immediately Relieves 
COUGHS, 

CONSUMPTION, 
ASTHMA, 
BRONCHITIS, 
TIC, 
SPA3MS, 
HYSTERIA, 
DIARRHCEA, 
DYSENTERY, 
CH0LER1, 
CRAMP, AGUE, 
Sea-Sickness, &c. 



REVISED PRICE LIST. 

Betail. Per doz 
I. (i. £ t. d. 

Towle's Chlorodyne 1 H 0 8 6 

Ditto .. ..29130 

Ditto (3 fluid oz.) 4 6 1 16 0 

Ditto (8 ,. ) 11 0 4 13 0 

Liq.Chlorodyni ( ^""J^^/'""'" 4 ) i lb. 2/6 each } Fordil . 

Ditto ditto ilb. 4/6 „ f JKESS. 

Ditto ditto I lb. 8/- „ ' 

Winchester QuartR (6 lb.) 7/6 per lb., bottles free. 

Towle's Antibilious Pills 1 11 0 8 S 

Ditto 29.133 

Towle's Chlorodyne Lozenges ) f 0 74 0 5 6 

Ditto Jujubes 1 il 1J 0 8 0 
Ditto in bulk, bottles free, containing 
1 lb , 2,9 each. 

Ditto ditto 1 lb. 10 oz.. 4,6 „ 

Litto ditto 4 lb., 10/- .. 

X.B. — The Commissioners will allow them to be fold 
by the i^tailcrs witbout further duty, provldf d they 
are s mply wrapped in paper, and not enclose! in a 
bo.r. bottle, or pticktt. 

Thsrnion'n Celebrated Toilet Cream 1 0 0 9 0 

Ditto 16 0 14 O 

Ditto 2 6 14 0 

Ambeltne ( Registered TMdc Xfark) .. ..26140 
The Th, rnton (Red) Lntiou (Stamped).. .. 2 6 14 0 

Thornton's Pamgon Hair Wash 1 0 0 9 0 

Ditto 2 6 14 0 

Postert, Bills, and Showcards on application. 

£5 worth (assorted or otherwise) Carriage Paid. 
7 lb. Lozenges and upwards stamped with Chemist's 
own name, free ot cnarge. 

A. P. TOWLE & SON. 

75 Back Piccatmlly. 

Manchester. 



April IS, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



XilX 



LOFTHOUSE & SALTMER, 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS, ZfiSSZ DRUG MERCHANTS, 

HUL f , , 

Manufacturers of all Pharmaoeutioal Preparations on the best and most improved principles. Quotations on Application. 

'RS IN PURE CHEMICALS 

For Medicinal, Photographic, and Commercial purposes. 

Essential Oils; Valentia Saffron; Vanillas; 



Importers of Cod Liver, Castor, and 
Olive Oils; Extra Super Essence of Lemon 
and Bergamot, Otto de Rose, and all 

Special Agents for Sicilian Sublimed Sulphur 
in 2-cwt. bags, and Rolled Sulphur in 3-cwt. 




Fruit Essence; Carmine; Aniline Dyes; 
Bees' Wax, Ac, &c. 

casks. Most Favourable Quotations can be given 
on application. 



NEPENTHE. 



THE SAFEST AND BEST PREPARATION OF OPIUM. 

PRODUCES NEITHER HEADACHE, SICKNESS, NOR CONSTIPATION. 

PREPARED EXCLUSIVELY FROM OPIUM. 

Although many new hypnotics and analgesics have been recently introduced, NEPENTHE still holds its position as the hypnotic and sedative 
par excellence. " Nepenthe " is registered under the Trade Marks Act, and is our sole property. jVo other preparation should be substituted when 
Nepenthe is ordered in a prescription. 

Sent out in bottles bearing a label in white letters upon a green grouud. We prepare also Double Strength Nepenthe, and Glycerole ot Nepenthe 
(eight times the single strength) for hypodermic injection. 

PRICES -A-ICTD TEEMS OICT APPLICATIOISr. 



FERRIS & CO,, 



WHOLESALE AMD 
EXPORT DRUGGISTS 



BRISTOL. 




V 



ft 




Obtainable through the Wholesale Druggists throughout Great Britain and Ireland, and of 

KTJHN, 36 St. Mary-at-Hill, LONDON, 

SOLE WHOLESALE AGENT FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM AND EXPORT. 

PAMPHLETS AND PRICES ON APPLICATION. 

INDING 

In all its branches by Patent and Improved Steam Machinery. 




f§ DRUGS, CHEMICALS, FULLER'S EARTH, 

jpr Seeds, Spices, R oots, B arks, &c. 

JORDAN & CO., BERMONDSEY GRINDING MILLS, 



WHITE'S GROUNDS, BERMONDSEY, LONDON, S.E. 



75 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



(*U1»I» i, «m BUT 



April 18, 1891 



BARRON, HARYEYS & GO, 



GILTSPUR STREET, LONDON, E.C. 



Beg 



to inform their friends and the Trade generally that, having 

purchased the Business of 

BARRON, SQUIRE & CO , BUSH LANE, 

and also the various Formulae of the Special Preparations of 

JAMES BASS & SONS, HATTON GARDEN, 

they are prepared to execute orders for the same, and pledge them- 
selves to supply them in all their integrity. 

Rneeimens nf ihttn P—nnratinnt katta rrmaxned <• the MtLteum of KeiB Garden* during 23 year I without deterioration. 



UNG. EMOLLIENS ( 



ELTON 

CO. 



AN IDEAL OINTMENT BASIS. 
Uno. Emollikns is prepared expressly for the Medical Profession, arid 
will be found to far surpass in therapeutic value any previous preparation 
of the kind brought to iheir uotioe. 

UNG. EMOLLIENS ANTISEPTIGUM 

Prepared by the same special process of manipulation as the Uno. 
Emollikns, but medicated by combination wii h a new and specially pre- 
pared basic and antiseptic Salt of Zinc and other approved remedial. 

The following skin diseases may be mentioned, in which it has proved 
a most valuable and certain remedy : — Pruritus Ani, Eczema, Aone 
Posacea, Erythema, Heroes, Impetigo, Psoriasis, Scurvy, Erysipelas, 
Urticaria, Piurigo, Tiuea-Versiculor, or any other irritation ot the 
epidermal surfaoe. 

It is perfectly miscible with all fats, oils, and waters, and may be 
dispensed with any other iLeoicament the physician desires to use in 
addition to its present constituents. 

Prepared only by the Proprietors, Messrs. Elton - & Co., 28 Endsleigh 
Gardens, N.W. 

Sole Wholetale Agrnts : — 

H. GJLBERTSON & SONS, 11 St. Andrew's St., Loudon, E.C. 



•3 £• 



PURE TARTAR E METIC. 

PURE OXIDE OF ANTIMONY. 

Showing 98 per cent, of anhydrous Sb,0,. 

This product is obtained BY A NEW PROCESS, and 
is offered at VERY ADVANTAGEOUS PRICES. 



POULENC FRERES, & 

92 Hue Vieille du Temple, PABI8. £• 



Grand Prize, Universal Exhibition, Paris, 1889. 



NOW BEING LARCELY PRE- 
SCRIBED BY THE MEDICAL 

PROFESSION. 
OBTAINABLE DIRECT FROM 
CONSIGNEES OR WHOLESALE 
HOUSES. 



PEPSINUM 
CONC. 
" LANGEBEK." 



ONE PART OF THIS 
PEPSIN DISSOLVES 
635 PARTS FIBRIN. 



Sole Consignees for the United 
Kingdom, 

G. J. B. PARKES & CO. 

196 BELSIZB ROAD, 
hi I II , II V. V w 

And 28 CIRCUS ROAD, 
St. JOHN'S WOOD, IV. W. 

WRITE FOR PAMPHLET. 



ESTABLISHED 1813- 



CLAY, DOD & COMPANY, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT DRUGGISTS, 

52 ST. ANNE STREET, LIVERPOOL. 

Addreas for Telegrams— " CLAY LIVEBPOOL." Telephone No. 1192. 

Mills and Laboratories — WAKEFIELD STREET. 



IMPORTERS OF ESSENTIAL OILS, OLIVE OILS, CASTOR OIL. 

FINEST NORWEGIAN COD LIVER OIL. 

Manufacturers of all •descriptions of 



PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS, COATED TASTELESS PILLS. 

Powders ground in own mills. Purity guaranteed. 
Samples free on application. Special Quotation to Cash or Large Buyers. Monthly Priced List forwarded on receipt of business card. 

BITUMINOL, OR VASELINE SUBSTITUTE. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

AlPl'LEni.fT 



xtxi 



TO WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS, &c. 



Buyers of the following are invited to send for Samples and Prices before placing their 
Orders elsewhere. They will find it to their ADVANTAGE to do so. 



BENZINE. la 6</. and Is. bottles. 
CEMENT. To retail Id and 3</. 

CASTOR OIL (Crystal, Tasteless). In bulk, or packe 1 in 
to 1 lb. 

In casks, or packed in 6d. and Is. 



bottles fiom J oz. to I lb. 



COD LIVER OIL. 

bottles. 

CORN SOLVENT. To retail Id. and 3</. 

FEEDING BOTTLES. All kinds. 
FLY PAPERS. 

FULLER'S EARTH (Powdered). In bulk or in packets. 
GLYCERINE. 1° balk or packed in bottles, from 4 oz. to lib. 
COLZALINE (or Golden Oil). Onr Sociality. 



HAIR OIL. In bulk, or packed in bottles, from i oz. tol lb. 

INSECT POWDER. In bulk, or packed in Id., 2d., 3d., 
and 6d. ooxe.. 

LIME CREAM. I" 6,/. and Is. bottles. 
MENTHOL CONES. Extra PnwPrfnl Brand. To retail 
Id., 2d., 3d , <\d , and t>d. 

MACHINE OIL. In bulk, or in Id., 2d., and 6d. bottles. 
POMADES. All kinds, to retail from Id. upwards. 
PILLS. In bulk, or packed in Id. boxes. 

SEIDLITZ POWDERS, in boxes. 
TOOTHACHE TINCTURE, in id. and 3d. bottles. 
VASELINE SUBSTITUTE. 



In these days of competition, buyers should seek the best markets. We confidently state that no 

other firm offers the advantages that we do. 



WRITE FOR SAMPLES A1TD FRIGES. 



W. & H. JACKSON, 14 MANESTY LANE, LIVERPOOL. 

JVL 










FOR PHARMACEUTICAL AND MANUFACTURING PURPOSES 

CARBONATE, in BLOCK, POWDER, or WEIGHED BLOCKS. 

CALCINED & PURE HYDRATE OF MAGNESIA. 

PURE FLUID MAGNESIA. 

OZlnTIE OIF THIS BES T BRANDS MAEE. 



For Prices and Particulars apply to 

THE WASHINGTON CHEMICAL CO., WASHINGTON, COUNTY DURHAM, ENGLAND. 

DRIED MOSS Compressed into Sheets 

8jn.- Spliaguxim or Turf Moss (Bcokstroom's). 

On account of its great capability of sucking up or imbibing liquids, this forms a useful dressing for absorbing the Discharge 
from open Wounds, and especially Urinary Discharge in Bladder, Kidney and Dropsical Affections. It is Antiputrescent, and 
may be made thoroughly Antiseptic by being sprayed with Sublimate Solution before use. The pressed sheets will absorb 

eight times their weight of water, and when disintegrated may be formed into Elastic Pillows 

or Puds by enclosure in Muslin Bags. 

London Agent — WILLIAM MART IND ALE, 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST, 
10 NEW CAVENDISH STREET, LONDON, W. 

77 




xxxii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Apkil 1§, 1891 



BISHOP'S 

GRANULAR EFFERVESCENT PREPARATIONS. 

"ALFRED BISHOP" was the Inventor and Original Mati'ifaeturar of all Granular Effervescent Preparations. 

All others are imitations. 



SILVER MEDAL, PARIS EXHIBITION. 1889, 



HI6HEST AWARD FOR GRANULAR PREPARATIONS. 



Citrate of Caffeine 
Citrate of Lithia 
Citrate oE Potash 
ANTIPYRIN 

Lithia Benzoate ... 

Nux Vomica 

Iron Carb. (Formula Bland) 



1, 3, 5, and 10 grs. in 1 dr. 

5 do. 

... 10 
5 and 10 
5 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Sodium Bromide ... 
Phenacetin ... 
Caffeine Hydrobromate 
Iron and Arsenic ... 
Exalgine 

Lithia Salicylate ... 
Soda Salicylate 
Soda Sulphate 



10 grs. in 1 dr. 

... 5 and 10 do. 
...1, 3, and 5 do. 
4 grs. and 3 mns. in 1 dr. 
1 and 2 grs. in 1 dr. 
... 5 do. 
... 5 and 10 do. 
10 do. 



MAGNESIA CITRATE (the Original). 



We are now making a Second Quality Citrate of Magnesia at 1*. 3d. per lb. less 10 per cent., sold only in bulk, smallest 
quantity 4^ lbs. Special Discounts for larger quantities. We guarantee this to be a thoroughly sound and reliable article. 

AND ALL OTHER G RANULAR EFFERVESC ENT PREPARATIONS. 

List free on application. None genuine without this Trade Mark. 

ALFRED BISHOP & SONS, 

MANUFACTURING CHEMISTS, "Speck's Fields," 48 Spelman Street, LONDON, Eng. 





ESTABLISHED 
1772. 



HENRY'S CALCINED MAGNESIA 

Continues to be prepared with scrupulous care in the greatest chemical purity, by 

Messrs. THOMAS <t WILLIAM HENRY, 11 East Street, St. Peter's, Manchester 

And is sold In bottles, authenticated by a Government Stamp bearing their Names. Trade Mark, " Henry's Calcined Magnesia." 

Price 4s. 6d., ox- 3s. Od. 
NEW YORK — Messrs. W. H. Schieffblin & Co., Willi Bra Street. PARIS — Messes. Eobehts & Co., 6 Eue de la Paix 



The "Chemist and Druggist "Series 

Which all Chemists ought to have and to read as faithfully 
as their British Pharmacopoeia, viz., 
A T . "F» ~F"! 7 .g; 

" HANDY BOOK OF MEDICINE STAMP DUTY " 

(Price 2/6, by post 2/9), and 

" THE ART OF DISPENSING " 

(Price 3/6, by post 3/10). 

MANUAL OF PHARMACEUTICAL TESTING 

(B. S. Pboctob, F.I.C. Price 2/6, by post 2/9). 



ARTIFICIAL HUMAN EYES from GLASS. 

Excellent Quality. £6 per 100. 
Plain Clinical Thermometer*, in wood ca»es, 
10/ per doz. Clinical Thermometert, with im- 
perishable index, cn mawive tubes, about 4j 
inches, in boxwood cases, 16/ t.er doz. ; in 
nickel, IS/ per doz. Clinical Thermometer, 
eeveial kinds. Glass SyiiDges in alt kind* and 
■izee, at wholesale prices. Homoeopathic 
Medicine Glarsea of all k nds. 
R EEEREA'CES RRQUIR*ED. 

OSCAR BOCK, Kiel (Germany), ^ggSSL^aSSS.'* 




VETERINARY COUNTER PRACTICE, 

J'xice 3s. 6d. Post Free, 3*. 9d. 

Published at the Offices of " The Chemist and Druggist,'' 

LONDON AND MELBOURNE. 

May be obtained from most Wholesale Houses, who invoice 
the Books at the published prices. 

78 





SQUIRE KNIGHT'S EYE OINTMENT. 


THE 


One of tho oldest Eye Ointments in the 
V market. Secured and held a tplei did 
\ snle without advertising. The present 


SURVIVAL 


\ proprietor, W. II. Richardson, F.C.S, 
V Chemist, Dudley, desires to advise 
\ Chemists that Squire Knight's Eye 
\ Ointment is bjing extensively 
\ advertised. As an increased 


OF THE 


\ and extending trade is sure 
\ to result Chemists would do 
\ well to stock it. At all 
\ Wholesale Mouses. 


FITTEST. 


\ Correspondence to the 
\ Head Depot at Dudley 
\ will always receive 
\ prompt attention. 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
ni KM i: vr 



xxxiii 




BY ROYAL LETTERS PATENT. 



THE 




'FLY CEMETERY' 

TRADE MARK REGISTERED. 

W" E again beg respectfully to call the attention of the Trade to our well-known Non-poisonous Fly Paper, the " Fly 
Cemetery," the title of which has become a familiar household word. The enormous annual increase in the output 
is the best proof of its popularity. Last year, in spite of a cold season and a host of worthless imitations (of the skating 
rink order), we again had an increase of over a million and a half papers above that of 1889. The whole of our parchment 
paper (upon which the " Honey Fly Gum" is spread) has been specially manufactured for us, so that we are enabled to. 
guarantee its excellent quality, and in older to meet the anticipated further demands for the coming season, we have laid 
down several new patent machines. The efficacy of the "Fly Cemetery " has been testified to in a remaikable manner by 
the retail trade, but this year we have received a collection of splendid 

Testimonials from nearly the Hole of the Leading Wholesale Houses 

dealing in proprietary goods ; such a consensus of opinion has never before been published. Samples and Testimonials free 
on application from the Patentees, 

TUNBRIDGE & WRIGHT, FLY PAPER MflUFACTDRIRS, READING. 



CAUTION. 

We beg to warn you against Fraudulent Imitations, as our rights are protected by Patents, and persons offering such imita- 
tions for sale are liable to legal proceedings. During last season, 1890, we obtained two perpetual injunctions, the defendants 
paying damages and costs, and six others gave undertakings in similar terms to avoid proceedings. 

Messrs. MANN & TAYLOR, 109 New Oxford Street, London, the solicitors for Messrs. TUNBRIDGE & WEIGHT, of 
READING, the Patentees and Sole Proprietor?, have standing instructions to take immediate pioceedings against ail 
nf ringers. 

£1,000 REWARD. 

MITCHAM OILS of PEPPERMINT. 

Where to obtain them genuine, direct from the growers. Guaranteed pure as 
distilled from the herb, without any rectifying or any other mixing process. 

The above reward will be paid to any person who shall prove that we have 
ever had any dealings, direct or indirect, in any Foreign Peppermint Oil, or in any 
other but PURE MITCHAM BLACK AND WHITE, of which we 
are the largest growers in England. 

ESTABLISHED NEARLY 20 YEARS. 

THE WHOLESALE TRADE ONLY SUPPLIED. 



FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES ADDRESS- 




HERB GROWERS AND DISTILLERS OF ESSENTIAL OILS, 

BEDDINGTON CORNER, MITCHAM, SURREY. 



xxxiv 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

NIPPLES BUT 



April 18, 1891 



"AGREED AT LAST." 



The Statuette, as drawing below, is effectively produced in Terra Cotta, the likenesses of the two great 
political leaders being most striking, and their expression clearly shows they have at last found a topic on 
which no difference of opinion can exist, viz., that f« HOCKIN'S ACME CONES ARE THE BEST." 
We present this striking group, which is 18 inches high, with all first orders for £2 10s. worth of our 

" ACME " BRAND PURE MENTHOL CONES 

(not more than £1 in value to be taken in Id., 2d., and 3d. Cones.) 



w 

A 

R 

R 
A 
N 
T 
E 

0 



NEW PATTERNS, 
SPECIALLY 

SALEABLE. 

No. 

•217k. Glass Show Bottle, 
with foot, as fig. 83, 1/8 
per doz. 

•217a. Glass Show Bottle, 
with foot, as fig. 161, 3/- 
per doz. 

•214a. Glass Show Bottle, 
with foot, as fig. 161. This 
has a very large Cone. 4/3 
per doz. 

| 220. Cone Shape, as fig. 203, 
each in slide box, 1 doz. in 
Cuter, extra size, 4/3 per 
doz. 

•221. Large Flat Draughts- 
man, very large Cone (120 
grains), 4/9 per doz. 

222. Elegantly cut Show 
Glass Bottles, as fig. 222, 
3 cuttings, 9/- per doz. 

224. Enamelled Tin Box, 
Printing on box, 30 gr. 
Cone, 1/6 per doz. 

• Thete are packed in \-doz. I 
Uanyiiiy atau-fronted Boxei. 




1(1. CONES. 



219. Willow Boxes, bottle, 
barrel, or acorn shape, 
3 doz. on card, one sort 
or assorted, 6/6 gross. 



Sd. CONES. 

202s. Polished Willow Boxes, 
bullet thape, 2 doz. on card, 
12/- gross. 

201s. Polished Willow Boxes, 
barrel shape, 2 doz. on card. 
12/- gross. 

206s. Polished Willow Boxes, 
cone shape, 2 doz. on card. 
12/- gross. 



3d. CONES. 

207s. Polished Willow Boxes, 
Draughtsman shape, 18/- 
gross. 



4<1. CONES. 

88a. Polished Soft Wood, 
pedestal shape box, 80 1 
grain cones, 1 doz. on 
card, 2/9 doz. 



P 

u 

R 
E 

M 

E 
N 
T 
H 
0 
L 



We only quote the most saleable patterns here. Detail of all shapes on application 



For Bayers who find 50/- worth too much, we shall be glad to send with an order for 25/- an OPAL GAS 
GLOBE, lettered as an Advertisement for Menthol, which makes a most striking and attractive addition to a 
Pharmacy. 

HOCKI1T, WILSOU &c CO. 

13 to 16 NEW INN YARD, 188a TOTTENHAM COTJHT ROAD, LONDON, W. 

CATALOGUE OF SUNDRIES AND SPECIALITIES FORWARDED ON RECEIPT OF BUSINESS CARD. 



80 



Apkil 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND 1ST 
Niii»i»i.i-..n k^x 



XXXV 



SHIRLEY'S 

A1 MENTHOL CONES & OTHER SPECIALITIES ! 

FIRST OF ALL, a few words on the question of "ORIGINALITY." 
WHO has done the most to create the trade in MENTHOL CONES? Has not the Al BRAND led the way? 
Therefore, as the Proprietor of the Al Brand, I feel perfectly justified in supplying Cones in any shape or form in which 
they may be introduced, seeing that all Patterns I have myself put on the market have been studiously copied by others. 



No. 
8p. 

103b. 

113b, 

111. 

112. 

17f. 



BOXWOOD PATTERNS. 

6d. Acorn, on foot 3/3 doz. 

4rf. Pedest»l 2/6 „ 

td. Reversible 3/6 „ 

lj. Aoorn, on foot 6/6 „ 



6<f. Draughtsman 3/3 

!*• , 6/- 

9cm li. Reversible 4/6 

•6. 6tf. Pedestal 3/8 

•14l. li. „ 6/3 

•17s. 6d. Draughtsman 3/9 , 

•17fp. 1j. „ 5/6 

• These Patterns have directions primed on 
the Boxwood. 




No. 40. 

THE WATCH SHAPE, 

Which is really a Draughtsman modi- 
fied and made flatter. 3/3 doz. 
Special Prices to Wholesale Buyers. 



CHEAPER PATTERNS. 

No. 

HOv. Id. Vase Bhape, 3 doz. on card .... If- groat. 

110p. Id. Pedestal „ „ , 7/- „ 

114. 2d. Vase, varnished „ „ 14/- „ 

114p. 2d. Pedestal „ „ , 14/- „ 

115. Zd. Flat shape „ 2 doz. on card .. 20/- „ 
109. 4<f. Willow Pedestal 2/6 do*. 

117. 6<f. Large „ 3/3 „ 

118. 6i. Lighthouse shape 3/- „ 



The Charming China Figure 
JUSTICE given away with 40/- j 
order assorted Cones. 



<§r NEW 15/- CASE. 

Anyone ordering 15/- worth of Cones, assorted, other 
than Id., is presented free with a most attractive 
folding Counter Case, with glass front. 

Handy and Pretty. 



NEW SEASON'S LOOFAH GOODS. 

No. 112. GLOVE, Loofah and Coloured Turoo 6/6 doaen. 

„ 116a. „ „ „ White Turco 4/8 „ 

„ 116c. „ „ „ Coloured Canvas 4/8 „ 

„ 130. BELT „ „ „ Turco 9/9 „ 

„ 125. „ » » „ „ larger 12/3 » 

„ 124. „ „ „ Rough Turco ; 12/- „ 

„ 129. „ Loofah both sides 9/6 „ 




BEFORE BUYING SMELLING BOTTLES, CHINA BOTTLES, 
TOILET BOTTLES, ODOMTORS, Ac, 

CALL OR WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES. 

A large quantity to select from. 

New Patterns constantly added. 

GOOD 1/- SPRAY. 

No. 41.— Assorted Coloured Glass, ribbed, ball on top 8/6 doz. 

„ 42.— 6d. Spray, assorted Colours 4/3 „ 

„ 43.-6d. „ „ „ ribbed 4/3 „ 

„ 44.— 9<i. „ „ „ , 6/- „ 



NEW CORNET SPRAY. 

Being the only one 
with Pump principle 
which can be held 
and worked with one 
hand. 

No. 47.— Assorted Coloured 

Crackled Glass 36/- doz 

„ 48.— Cream Coloured 

Opaque, with Flowers 60/- „ 
„ 49. — Globesbape, Blue& 

Gold, very elaborate.. 72/- „ 
„ 50. — Diamond shape, cut- 

i, most exquisite.. 72/- „ 




SPECIAL LIINTE. 

No. 1. — Double Ball, Opaque Blue Glass, Pink and Gold Flowers, 28/- doa. 



TOOTH SOAP.-AI. 

Splendid 6d. line on Easel Card. 
Sells at sight. 3/9 doz. 



WHEN ORDERING SPECIFY 
Al BRAND. 



CARBOLIC TOOTH P0WDER.-AI. 

Very attractively got up in Tin Boxes, 
i-oz. 2/2 .. 6 doz. 1/11 doz. .. 12 doz. 1/9 

1 „ 3/- .. „ 2/9 2/6 

1J ii 3/6 .. „ 3/3 „ .. „ 3/- 
3 „ 5/- .. „ 4/9 „ .. „ 4/6 



SHAVING 
Al CREAM. 

In Collapsible Tubes, 
attractively carded. 
4/- doz. 



Al BABY SOOTHERS. 

4<j.— Bone Ring, Polished 

Seamless Teat 2/4 doc 

Bd.— Bone Blng. Polished 

Seamloss Teat 3/6 dot. 

1 dozen on a Card. 




ETIENNE FRERES' PERFUMERY. 

EXQUISITE PERFUMES, ATTRACTIVELY GOT UP. 

6(1., In Cut Stoppered Bottles, tied with Silk Bow.... 4/ doz. I *U., in 1 oz. Cut Stoppered Bottles, Lundborg Bbapc 8/ doa. 

6rf., 1 oz. Round Essence, with Sprinkler 3/9 „ In 2 oz. „ „ „ „ 13 » 

6d., „ n n corked and capped 3/6 „ I li.,in4oz. „ „ „ „ 24/ » 

• If 3 dozen of this series be ordered, Chemists' own name oan be put in full. 

SAMPLE Id. TUBES, 3 or 6 doz. on card, 8/ gross. 2d. TUBE, 2 doz. on card, 15/ grow. 
Perfume in Bulk, double 7/ 20 oz.; Triple 10/ 20 oz. 

ARTHUR W. SHIRLEY, 55 FARRINGDON ROAD, LONDON. E.C. 



81 



JLXXV1 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SVPPLKn KMT 



Apiul 18, 1891 



VINCENT WOOD'S INVENTIONS. 

"EUREKA" GALVANO-ELECTRIG 



TRUSSES. 

Ask your 
Wholesale House 
for my 

SPECIALITY 
TRUSS, 

and 

talc no substitute. 

•Quality 1, Moleskin and Basil Leather, Colours In Dove, 
Pink, and Buff, 
rer dozen— Singlo, 11/6; Double. 18/6- 
Sbhs ur to 40 inchbs. Evert Spring Guaranteed. 





3HT UNDER 



BATTERY 
BELTS, 

As Advertised. 



Ladies' or Gents', 1 Power, 8 Batteries P/fi each. 

2 ., H 12 6,, 

3 24 166 „ 

„ „ SPINK BANDS 30- doz. 

As Sketch, Retail* at 5 6 each. • - 



A SAVINC OF 25 PER CENT. BY INSISTING UPON HAVINC THE " EUREKA " GOODS. 

Inspect Goods here, and place orders with Wholesale Bouses— 3 St. Andrew St., Holborn Circus, London, E.C. 

. Established 51 years. Telegrams: "Acme London." Telephone 6757. 



LARCEST BONA - FIDE 
MANUFACTURER OF 

Trusses, Belts, 
Elastic Hosiery, 
Suspensory Bandages, 

Obstetric Binders, 
Chest Expanding Braces. 

Calvano-Electrlc and 
Magnetic Appliance's, &c. 

Ohemists placing.stock orders 
supplied free of charge with 
Terracotta Statuettes, Glass 
Show Cases, ' Show Cards, 
Eleotros,~&c. 

Obtainable from your Whole- 
sale Dealer, or, refusing to 
supply, communicate direct 



Telegrams — 
" LINT LIVERPOOL." 

THE 




MANUFACTURERS 01 

FLAX, & COTTON, 



LIVERPOOL PATENT LINT CO. 

MARE ST. MILLS, 



ABSORBENT, AND CABDED 

COTTON WOOLS, 

ABSOBBENT, OPEN WHITE, and OBEY 

FHERFEELD ROAD NORTH, &&i BANDAGES, 

a it u n tp f 

LIVERPOOL. 




BUBGEOK'8, AND C ARB OLIZED 



LINT. 



GAIGEE TISSUE. 

(PITEIT ABSORBENT 6AUZE AID 
eonoi WOOL.) 

ABSORBENT 
COTTON WOOL. 

ROLL BANDAGES. 

ANTISEPTIC DRESSINGS. 



ROBINSON & SONS, 

GOTTON SPINNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

SURGEONS' LINTS, COTTON WOOLS. 

BANDAGES, & ANTISEPTIC DRESSINGS, 
WHEAT BRIDGE MILLS, 

HT^j^S, OHESTEEPIELD. 




Dapot — 5B Fann Street, lldersgate Street, London. 



GOLD MEDAL AWARDED, EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, 1890. 
No BATH ROOM op CARRIAGE Is fully Equipped without 



is 



9& 



RANKIN'S 
CORK MATS 



Warm, Soft, and Dry, Easily Washed, Clean, and Durable. 
They Prevent Chills in Bathing, and keep the (eet warm and comfortable- 
Mr. GLADSTONE pronounces them to be very useful, and Lord BALIS BUB, T 
and many of the Nobility andOentry now use and appreciate them. They prevent 
cold feet in Driving. In Church, In tne Counting-house, in otone-fioored Apart- 
ment*, numerous testimonials to their use'* . in a oreat variety of ways. 
Biiea i 1 ft. square to 10x48 in. Prices : 8/. 6/. 7/8, and 10/6 each. Special Mats 

up to 81/ each. Of all leading Chemists and Furnishing liouses. 

CAUTION — Each Genuine Mat branded "Rankin's Cork Mat." 
Wholesale terms on application to 

WM RANKIN & SONS Cork Importers.GLASGOW & LISBON. 
82 




WholemltjChtmlEt*' Agents: S. MAW, S0 K * THOMPSON. 



A-rh. 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

»1 I'l'l I HIM 



xxxvif 




& 

WE ARE STOCKING, AS LAST SEA80N, 

SPONGES ON CARDS 

At HALF the RETAIL PRICE . 

Will our London and Country Friends kindly NOTE ? 

Id. HONEYCOMB or TURKEY .. .. 6d. per dozen. 

2d. „ » .. .. if- 

3d. ., „ .. .. 16 

4d. „ .... 2 - „ 

6d. „ „ .... 3/- 

9d. „ „ .. ..4 6 

A I- ,, I, .... 6 - i, 

1/6 „ ., .. .. 9/- 

Also Spnng.n Unbleached, loose. 2d., 3d., 4d., 6d., 9d., 1/-, 
1/6, 2/-, 3 '-, 4/-, 6/-, 6 '-, 7/6, and 10/- per piece, cfcc., ic. 

95 FARRINGDON STREET, LONDON. 




(From W. WOOD & BOTH, MANCEESTEB), 



42 BELVOIR STREET, LEICESTER. 



Trusses, Single... ~ .- 
Double ~ _ 
Single Femoral 
Double „ 
Single Scrotal 
Double „ 



» 
»i 



12/6 per doz. 
20/- „ 
17/- „ 
28/- „ 
34/- 
12/- 



ii 



Elastic Stockings, Cotton — 
Silk - 
Suspenders, Cotton Bags 

„ Silk Bags 
Clinical Thermometers — 
Elastic Gum Catheters ~ 



2/2 each. 

8/4 „ 

6/6 per doz. 
14/- „ 
25/- „ 

7/6 „ 



TERMS-5 per cent, discount Cash; 2\ per cent, discount Monthly. 



SURGICAL APPLIANCES. 





MAGNETIC BELTS AND APPLIANCES. 




i 



Patent Pile, Protected, 
14,618. The Pile lying 
oVer ih< Indium bber 
Cords, proteoting tbem 
and forming a smooth soft 
Kurf:iOi Co the limb. 



Elastic Surgical Stockings, Knee Caps, <fec. 
Patent Spiral Seamless Elastic Stockings, 
<fcc. 

Patent Pile Surgical Elastic Stockings. 
Elastic Supports for Lawn Tennis, Cricket, 
Lacrosse, and other Athletic Sports. 
Bath and Rubbing Gloves. 
Bathing Caps and Belts. 



Lint, 



Trusses of every description. 
Poro-plastic Jackets. 
Bandages — Indiarubber, Elastic, 

Cotton, Sayres', &c. 
Chest Expanding Braces. 
Horse Ear Caps & Veterinary Appliances. 
Suspensory Bandages. 
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Belts. 



Hot Water Bottle, and Covers, Respirators. Inhalers, Bronchitis Kettles. Throat Sprays. 
Waterproof Coats, Cloaks and Driving Aprons, Footballs. Shin Guards, and Athletic Appli- 
ances, Druggists' Sundries , Invalid and Murs ery Ap plianoes, Ac 

MANUFACTURER AND PATRNTRB : 

J. H. HAYWOOD, CASTLE GATE, NOTTINGHAM. 

London Agent— HENRY C, QUELCH, St. Paul's Chambers. 1 Ludgate Square. E.C. ^ 



xxxviii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Apeii. 18, 1891 



R, I. BARRETT'S NEW PATENT BOTTLE, 

THE ONLY REALLY PERFECT CAPPED BOTTLE FOR VASELINE, POMADE, DRY POWDERS, fco. 

PRICES (in 5-gross Lots) :— Fitted with STRONG METAL CAPS, CORK-LINED, in various colourB, very attractive 
in appearance— 1 oz., 12/6 ; 1£ oz., 13/6 ; 2 oz., 14/6 ; 3 oz., 16/ ; 4 oz., 18/ per gross. 
Fitted with best BOXWOOD CAPS— 1 oz., 15/6 ; 1£ oz., 16/6 ; 2 oz., 17/6 ; 3 oz., 21/6 ; 4 oz., 24/6 per gross. 

Chemists' and Perfumers' Bottles in great variety, Plain or Stoppered. Orders may be sent to the 

PRINCIPAL WHOLESALE HOUStS. 



FLINT Q-L.A.SS BOTTLE WORKS, 

THE OVAL, CAMBRIDGE HEATH, LONDON, E, 

Telegraphic Address-" FOBEFBONT LONDON." [2] 



3 and 4 

7/6 

3 and 4 

9/ 

i 

3,8 



i 

4/3 



12 

12/- 



DISPENSING BOTTLES & PHIALS. 

REDUCED PRICES. 

.. 6 and 8 

8/6 

CRYSTAL (BLUE TIM TED). 
.. 6 and 8 .. .. 12 
10/- .. .. 14/- 
WHITE PHIAL8. 

1 .. .. H .. 2 ounce. 

4- .. .. 4/9 .. .. 5/6pergross. 

WHITE PHIALS (SUPERIOR QUALITY). 

1 li .. . bounce. 

5/3 .. .. 6/9 .. .. 6/5 per gross. 



16 ounce. 
16/- per gioss. 

16 ounce. 
18/- pt r gross. 



I. ISAACS Sc eo. 

GLASS BOTTLE MANUFACTURERS, 

25 FRANCIS STREET, Tottenham Court Road, LONDON. 

BANKERS : LONDON AND WBSTMIM BTUJi HAJa*. 

ESTABLISHED UPWARDS OF BO "F*R«. 



STOKES' 

PATENT C HECK TILL SYSTEM. 

A 80UND INVESTMENT. 




Each Till has only to 
display 2d. pep week 
deficiency to return 16 
per cent, on outlay. 

30,000 

Bales Checked 
for' 

3 SHILLINGS. 



Termt and full particulars on application, 

G. R. STOKES & CO., Limited, Hanley, STAFF. 



TRADEMARK 




}} 



'REGISTERED 



SPIRONE 

FOR THE TREATMENT AND CUBE OF ALL 

DISEASES the L UNGS, WINDPIPE, NO SE & THROAT. 

CLAIMS TO BE A 

Specific for all Congestive and Inflammatory Conditions of the Eespiratory Apparatus, 

And will be found efficacious in 

COUGHS AND GOLDS, ASTHMA, BRONCHITIS, 

Inflammation and Congestion of the Lungs, Pneumonia, Pleurisy, Whooping Cough, Croup, Diphtheria, 
Pharyngitis, Laryngitis, Catarrh, Sore Throat, Quinsy, Enlarged Tonsils, Hoarseness, Loss of Voice, 
Colds in the Head, Hay Fever, and all other Complaints of the Respiratory Organs. 

None Genuine except such as bear the above Trade Mark " SPIRONE " and the Signature of the Inventor upon the 

Bottles, on the Label over the Cork, and on the Wrapper. 

Retail Price 4s. 6d. and lis. per Bottle. Set of Apparatus for Administration, 15s. 

PAMPHLETS AND SHOWCARDS FREE ON APPLICATION. 



THE SPIRONE COMPANY, LIM., m«h»I 9 §K LONDON, W. 



84 



April 18, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

<»« M K!»T 



xxxix 



KILNER BROTHERS 



OF 



ALL SHAPES, SIZES, AID COLOURS, 



FOR 



In Green and White Flint. All the required sizes in Flat, 
Oval, Round, Octagon, and Direct Square. The " K " Brand 
is well known, and is in constant and increasing demand. 



66 



OUR BABIE S' BOTTLE. 



55 



Fitted in a large variety of styles to suit all classes of buyers 

Careful attention given to quality of Bottles and Rubber. 
Increasing sales testify to the satisfaction given by these Feeders. 



MINERAL WATERS. 

Codd's, Bulbs, and all the best Stoppered kinds ; full size 

and splits. 

Also CORK BOTTLES to suit all tastes. 



VAN BOXES and CASES 

To contain above and many other kinds of Bottles. 



BUYERS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO CORRESPOND. 

Samples, Price Lists, and Special Quotations for large quantities sent on application. 






No. 3 A GREAT NORTHERN GOODS STATION, KING'S CROSS, LONDON. 



85 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
m I'l'i ium 



April 18, 1891 



BYGRAVE 

SHOP FITTER 

111 Shepherdess Walk : 

CITY ROAD, 
LONDON, N. 

Bent-top plate-glass Counter Showcase, in French polished mahogany, or ebonized, with 
two upright mirror plate-glass fronted shelves, and table in centre for serving over, and 
mahogany falls at back lined with mirror plate glass, inside fitted with crimson velvet trays — 
if 5 ft. long, 18 in. wide, 8 in. high (total height 13 in.), £5 10s. ; 5 per cent, off for cash. 




(Established 20 Years), 



SHOW CASE MAKER & SHOP FITTER 

MAKE MT OWN, AND WORK GUARANTEED. HUNDREDS OF TESTIMONIALS AND REFERENCES. 




Eemoved from 207 to 242 Old St. (Shoreditch End), LONDON. Woikshops— HeilSOll St., E.C. (Only Addresses) 
No connection with any other house of the same name. Please address in full. 



"THE CHEMIST" DISPENSING C OUNTEH 



6 feet long by 2 feet wide .. £24 
If the Dispensing Screen only, £12 



This handsome Dispensing CouDter is manufactured 
In Spanish mahogany, and of the best workmanship, so 
that it will stand any climate. The counter has a lolid 
mahogany top, and plate-glass case front. The centre 
part fitted to take sponge. A mahogany screen on top, 
eensisting of two plate-glass cases, with shelves inside, 
and large plate-glass mirror in the centre, and three 
glass tablets with gold writing in ornamental 
mahogany carved work. Ths back of screen fitted 
with small shelves and a glass poison cupboard. The 
inside of counter fitted with strong counter drawers, 
label and cork drawer, open shelves, <fec. 

BOWLING & GOVIER 

Manufacturer* of High-class Shop Fittings, 
GUN ST., BRUSHFIELD ST. 
BISHOPSGATE, E;C. 





NOTICE TO THE TRADE. 

In consequence of inferior Second- 
hand Good* being told for our mate, 
ute have found it necessary to protect 
our reputation for best work with a 
Trade Mark, at above, and unlets 
goods are to stamped im cannot 04 
antaerable. 




BSTABLISHEID 1830. 



». ra O W H. E T T , 

MEDICAL AND 

GENERAL SHOP FITTER, 

Shop-Pront Builder and Show-Case Maker. 



EXPOBT OEDSE8 OAKBITJIiliT PACKED AND SHIPPED. 



SHOPS FITTBD by Oontraot, in Town or 
Country, with every requisite, on the most im- 
proved principles, and at lowest prloes. 

NTJMBROTJS REFERENCES may be obtained 
•t Leading Chemists in all parts of the Kingdom. 





A LARGE STOCK ef New and Seoond-hamd 
Fittings and Cases to be sold very OHRAP. 

CABINET FITTER to the Pharmaceutical 
Sooiety of Great Britain. 

PLANS and ESTIMATES SUPPLIED. 



■""'" ''""Ilirflllnlnmiimi m - ..tuiiHiiimum" ill 

Manufactory and Showrooms— 4 Lindley St, Sidney St., Mile End Road, LONDON, E. 

86 



April IS, 1891 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

m HUM 



xli 



WILLIAM TOOGOOD'S 



BURLINGTON BUILDINGS, 

HEDDON STREET, REGENT STREET, LONDON, W. 

TOOGOOD'S BRUSH MIXING MACHINE. 




To mix 3 lbs. Powder . 
To mix 1 lb. 



• • ■ 



... 12/- each. 
8/- each. 



All stock Machines are fitted with Sieves 60-mesh, but any other 
sizes can be supplied at same price. 

CROSSE'S SAFETY ENEMA PAN, 

REGISTERED No. 138,518. 




PBICES : 
In "White Earthenware ... ... ... 4/- each. 

In Stoneware ... ... ... ... ... 2/3 each. 



THE LACTOTHERME 

(Registered Trade Mark), Patented; or, 

INFANT'S PORTA BLE FO OD STOVE. 

THE BEST MEANS OF HEATING CHILDREN'S MILK. 

MAINTAINS A TEMPERATURE OF 98° r\_SIX TO SEVEN HOURS. 

DOES NOT CAUSE THE MILK TO TURN SOUR. 
DESCEIPTIVE PAMPHLET POST IF K IE IE3 . 

Prices: 6/-, 8/6, 10/- each. w 



Colonial and Foreign Enquiries and Correspondence solicited. 




87 



xlii 



THE CHEMIST AND'. DRUGGIST 



Apbil 18, 1891 



CARBOLIC ACID. 

Liquid, Crude and Refined, Crystals (Detached and Glacial, B.P.). 

SPECIALITY. — 0ar Refined Liquid Carb. Acid is a bright pale colour, guaranteed 97 per cent, to 99 per cent., and free 

nom all impurities, such as Sulphuretted Hydrogen, &c. 
CONTRACTS FOR 1891. — We sha11 De pleased to submit very lowest prices for delivery during 1891 to large Buyers. 

atato appioximate quantities required. 

CARBOLIC POWDERS. — 5 cent - t0 20 F>e r cent., from £6 P er ton - Pink, White, or Grey Colours. 

Piuk an o, in large black and gold tin boxes, |/- sizes, 4/6 P er dozen; |/g sizes, Qj- per dozen. 
CRE0S0L OR SANITARY FLUID.— Half usual prices. Samples atid quotations on application. 

BUY FROM THE M AKERS THE CHEAPEST HOUS E IN THE TRADE. [2] 

HAMILTON & CO., Ltd., The Sovereign Chemical Worts, WANDSWORTH, LONDON, S.W , 

CARBOLIC DISINFECTANTS 





London*. 1884. 



London, 1884. 

BEFORE ORDERING ELSEWHERE write for detailed Price Lists and Samples of 

POWDERS, ACIDS, FLUIDS, SOAPS, &c. 

TO 

ADAMS, WEBSTER & CO. 

Wholesale & Export Disinfectant Manufacturers, HACKNEY, LONDON, N.E. 




or 




It 




The machines can now be seen at work as under 



TREMUS 



TABERNACLE 



CASTLE STREETS J 
FULL PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION. « 



LONDON 



G. B. KENT & SONS 

Have been awarded the ONLY 




•\BRUSH FACTORiT?V 
LONDON 




DESTRUCTION OF RATS 

&e. 



P 



STEINER'S 

VERMIN PASTE 



REGISTERED. 




Is used in 
Australia, 
Neio Zealand, 
West Indies, 
India, 
Cape, 
etc., etc. 



A.D. 1777. CD 

At the Paris Exhibition, 1889, for 

ENGLISH BRUSHES 

See pages 169-172 WINTER ISSUE, January 31'rt, 1891. 
88 



Ireland 6* Wales. 
Is a Sure and Certain Destroyer of 

RATS, COCKROACHES, WICE, AND BLACOEETLES 

IT NEVER FAILS I 1 ! 

The great strength of Stciner's Paste 1b not Impaired In hot climates. 
Sold in M. . 6d.. and If. Glnss Jars, and 2i. 6d. Tins. 
Wholesale and Export at the 

WORKS, HENRY ST., LIMEHOUSE, LONDON. 



ASK YUUB CHEMIST FOB IT. 



Established 1868. 



Afail 18, 1891 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

»ii>i*i,i:iiiK]iT 



3(1111 



PETROLEUM JELLT, 

PARAFFINUM MOLLE B.I*. ' 

(PIONEER BRAND) Registered Trade Mark. 

Equal to and Cheaper than VASELINE. 

FOR MEDICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES. 
White, Yellow, Veterinary, and Waterproof. All kinds put up in 1-lb., 5-lb., 7-lb., 14-lb., 
28-lb., and 56-lb. Patent Tins, and in 300-lb. Barrels. 

Pure Castor Oil, Cod Liver Oil, White Mineral Oil, Best Eating Olive Oil, 
Pale and Crude Carbolic Acid, Carbolic Powders, Sheep Dip, Benzine 50 per 
cent, and 90 per cent., Crude and Rectified Spirits of Tar, Stockholm Tar, 

Camphor Ice, Carbon Candles. 



PATENT 



CARBOLZZBD PEAT, 

THE NEW AND POPULAR DISINFECTING POWDER. 



SEND FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES TO 



GRINDLEY & CO.. lim., POPLAR, LONDON, E. 



'ER^ABIjISHEID 1868.) 




WEDGWOOD ACID - PROOF 

MORTARS AND PESTLES. 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS 0* 

Funnels, Evaporating Fans, Eleotrio Battery Fittings, Bed. Fans, Urinals, Medioine 
Spoons, Physio Cups, Siok Feeders, Bleeding Basins, Medicine Measures, Eye Cups, 
Inhalers, Nursery Lamps, Wall Tiles, &o. 

Prick List oh Application. Special Quotations for Large Orders. 
Any Article not bearing the Stamped Trade Mark M WEDGWOOD" is not made by as. 

JOSIAH WEDGWOOD ~& SONS, ETBUBIA, STOKE - ON -TBENT, 

London Booms: ST. AVDE1WS BUILDING'S, HOLBOBN OIB0U8. 

GENUINE EMERY, EMERY CLOTH, A ND BLACK LEAD. 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Glass and Flint Paper, Emery and Glass Cloth ; Emery, Black Lead, Emery Wheels 
Pumice, Putty Powder, Crocus, Urn Powder, Tripoli, Rouge, Plate Powder, Steel Polish 
Furniture Polish, Knife Boards, Brunswick and Berlin Black, &c. 

OAKEY'S WELLINGTON KNIFE POLISH 

Prepared expressly for Oakey'i and other Knife Boards, Buff Leather Boards, and all the Patent Knife Gleaning Machines, 
Sold in Canisters with perforated Tops to prevent waste, at Id., 2d., 3d., 6d., U, Zt. 6d.,and 4». eaoh. 

OAKEY'S NON-MERCURIAL SILVERSMITH'S SOAP, 

For Cleaning and Polishing Silver, Plate Glass, Marble, &o. Tablets, 6d. eaoh. 

OAKEY'S " POLYBRILLIANT " (Registered). 

A Magio Pomade for Cleaning Brass, Copper, Tin, Pewter, Britannia Metal, Sio. Never beoomos dry and hard like other Metal Pasts ' 

Tins Id., 2d., 3d., and 6d. eaoh. 

WELLINGTON BLOCK BLACK LEAD, 

In Id., 2d., and Ad. Blooks, and 1*. Boxes. 

WELLH&T0Jf EMERY & BLACK LEAD MILLS, Westminster Bridge Road, London, S.E. 

Highest Award and Prize Medal, Philadelphia Exhibition, 1876; and Boston, 1883, Gold Medal, Crystal Palaoe, 188*. 

89 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



April <18, 1891 



•9 

W« wish to draw the attention of OhemistB to the exoellenoe of the spirit we lupply for pharmaceutical purposes. We have devote* 
great oare and attention to thii branoh and have made it a leading line. 

That our effort! in thii direotion have been appreciated is proved by the .umber ef unsolicited testimonials we have received from 
isarly every town in the country, of whioh the following is a specimen :— 

GENTLEMEN, — The Pharmaoy, Moreoambe. 

Please send 5 gall. 86 o.p. as before. I have pleasure In saying I have always found your spirit 
answer all tests, whioh is mors than I oan aay of all I have had from different plaoes, and also to 
be praotioally free from odour. 

Messrs. Stephen Smith & Co. Tours faithfully, JOSH. N. CUTTB, B.So., F.C.B. 

la oonsequenoe of the inoreaie in the spirit duty our prices will be— 

S.V.R. 56 o.p 10s. 7d. | Double Distilled, 58 o.p 19s. lid, 

CASH WITH ORDER. REDUCTIONS FOR QUANTITIES. 

SPECIALITY FOR PERFUMERY. 

This pure grain iplrit, whioh has been thrice reotified and filtered through charcoal, is being largely used In making high-olass Perfumes. 

Price, 20/2, 56 o.p. ; 20/8, 60 o.p. Cash with Order. Reductions for Quantities. 
STEPHEN SMITH *Sc CO., BOW, LONDON, E. 



S, V. METH. 



JONES & COMPANY, 

COPPERFIELD ROAD 

LONDON, E. 

LARGEST MAKERS IM THE KINGDOM. 



We are prepared to supply METHYLATED SPIRIT in 
5-gallon quantities at Lowest Prices. 

REDUCTIONS T O LARGE BUYERS. 

S-A-zmuphzes free. 



9 

DISTILLERS, F0RE1M WIM AID SPIRIT MERCHANTS, AID METHYLATORS, 

ALLHALLOWS' LA NE, & BARTHOLOMEW CLO SE, LONDON, E.C. 

Quotations for S.V.R. Methylated Spirit and Finish on application. 



JAMES 
BURR0U6H, 



SiViR, 



CALE ST., CHELSEA, 8.W. 

and Methylated Spirit 

AT LOWEST PBICEB. 



WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS, 



BEESWAX. 

W. H. B. PURE REFINED. I W. H. B. PURE WHITE. 

In 2-lb. oakei, In cases of about 130 lbf. In roxaA oakes In 2-lb. parcel., or In oblong oakes, loose 1 in oases of 54 Iba 

1 ]( n In oz. oakes in 2-lb. paroels / and 66 lbs. 

" * M " " ,Tn Plain blooks of 7, lbs. In oases of 250 lbs. 

* : : :, is ; white wax. 

„ oz. oakes in 2-lb. parcels in oases of 64 lbs. I Plain round oakes in 2-lb. paroels in oases of 72 lbs. 

The purity of these goods is oertifled by the following eminent ohemlsts : S. P. Sharplees, State Assayer, Boston ; J. W . Taylor, Associate of tha 
Bo«iety of Publio Analysts of Eng., Montreal, P. Q. ; Edward Dayies, P.O.S. and T. I. 0. and 0., Royal Institution, LIVERPOOL, Eng. ; Barnard 
Dyer, D.So., F.O.S., P.I.O., Member of the Society of Publio Analysts, 17 Great Tower Street, LONDON, B.C., Eng.; Wm. T. Wansel, Analyst and 
Assayar, San Francisco, Cal., and may be obtained at any of the leading Wholesale Druggists in the Northern and Midland Counties. 

We will deliver our good* in 6-cwt. lott ex quay, in any city which it the Termintu of a Steamthip Line throughout the Kingdom, without trouble or expeme to the Buyer 
Oar Good, may be obtained In single Caae lota from any of the Loading Wholesale Druggist. In the Northern and Midland Oountiea, and of 

W. H. BOWDLEAR & CO.. BOSTON, MASS., U.S.A. 

Cable Addrcui) Ofllee BLXkd. WarellOUSB — 3*3 CENTRAL WHARF. [BowdUar, Boeton. 

00 



Apbil 18, 1891 








xlv 


WHET'S 

LAM! 


\ n\ 


m 


fllCAL 

FOB 

IN HOI 


ESSENCE 

RSES. 



Agents Wanted in every Town. Handbills, with Name and Address, supplied gratia 
SO TEARS' UNBROKEN SUCCESS. 

SOLE MAKER ft PROPRIETOR, J. ROOKLEDGE, CHEMIST, EASINGWOLD, YORK. 

TO BE HAD OF USUAL WHOLESALE HOUSES. 



WALKER, TR0KE& CO. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS, 

82 CITY ROAD, 

LONDON, E.G. 




SOLE MAKERS OF 

GABRIEL & TROKE'S 
GELATINE CAPSULED 

HORSEBALLS 

AltPrative, Condition, Cordia 
Cough, Diuretic, H'ever. 
Physic, and "Worm Balls. 



QUOTATIONS & S-A-TyEIPXrES FBEE OJST APPLICATION". 



SPERM OH 



HUGH HIGHGATE & CO. 

PAISLEY, N.B. 

Refiners of 

SPERM OIL & SPERMACETI. 

SAMPLES ON APF LIGATION. 




Used on the JXiyal Farms at Windsor, Osborne, and Sandrmgitam, and by 
the principal Stockbreeder* even/where for nearly 60 years. 

DAY, SON * HEWITTS 

HORSE, CATTLE, AND SHEEP MEDICINES. 




THE CHEMICAL EXTRACT. 

Vol assuaging pain and inflammation In all wounds, saddle galls, strains, 
braises, swelling!, and relaxed tendons in Horses. For paining after calving 
tad lambing, and for swollen udders and sore feet. 

Ss. 6d. per Bottle ; i-dozen Box, 7s. 6d. 


THE BED PASTE BALLS and BED POWDEBS. 

For ill-oondltioned Horses and Celts ; invaluable after hard hunting or 
driving. For ooughs, colds, staring ooat, itching, Bwollen legs aad want oi 
strength. The powder given in the feed will produce fine appetite aid tone, 
7s. Od. per dozen ; 8-dozen Box, 21s. 


THE BED DBENCH. 

CMebraW tor inflammatory disorders, such as fevers, pleurisy, foot-and- 
mouth aomplatnts, yellows, surfeit, and red- water. Also for difficult calving 
and lambing. Admirably adapted for cleansing and checking feverish 
lymptomi In Oews and Ewes after a bad time of parturition. 

For Sheep, 8a. 6d. ; for Cattle, 18s. per dozen Box. 


THE BLACK PHYSIC BALLS. 
These Balls are matchless tor thoroughly cleansing the system si all Im- 
purities, and for assisting in the expulsion of Worms. Their purgative 
action soon relieves Oostiveness of the Bswels, and oheeks all Feverish 
Symptoms arising from gross habit. 

Price, 8s. per dozen ; Box oontainlng 8 dozen, 23s. 


THE GASEOUS FLUID. 

Uimatehed far eello or gripes and debility In Horses, tor eolds, ohllli, 
Skivering fits, flux and diarrhoea in Cottle, Calves, and Sheep. For Bwes 
weakly after lambing and blown Oattle and Sheep, its effects are mar vellens. 
20s. per dozen Box. 


THE BBONCHOLINB. 

The great and reliable remedy for Husk or Hoese la Oattle, Heifers 

Calves, and Sheep. Its gaBeous odour destroys the worm or parasite la tks 
windpipe, removes the hard cough, and soothes the lungs and other organ 
2s. 6d. per Bottle; i-dozen Box, 7s. 6d. 


THE GA8EODYNE. 

On* ai laadaaam In nncontrollable spasmodic pains aad vielont bewel 
■ •mplaints. Invaluable for parturition la Mares, Cows, and Ewes, 
f s. 6d. per Bottle ; i-dozen Box, 10s. 6d. 


THE "KEY TO FABBIEHY." 
A small werk published by us si the general ailments ef stoek, their 
treatment and oure. 

Large Edition, in Cloth, 2s. 6d. ; Small Edition, Is. 



fhe Stockbreeder's Medicine Chest. Ne. 1 eentaids a complete assortment ef all enr preparations far treating diseases of stook generally, £6 6 0 
The Stockbreeder's Medicine Chest. No. 2 is suitable for ordinary Form nse, and oontalns a useful seleotlon of tho above Medioinos - f l ° ° 
The Horsekeeper's Medicine Chest. No. 3 is arranged for large Horse Owners, Collieries, dto., and oontalns 18 speoiany seleoted Medjoines o ou 
The Horsekeeper's Medlelne Chest. Ne. 4 oontalns a smaller assortme nt, but has everything requisite f er all ordinary ailments in Morses c 1 1 o 

Prepared only bv DAY, SON & HEWITT, 22 DOBSET STREET, LONDON, W. 

LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO F0RSI6A BUYBRS. LIST AND PARTICULARS OF AQSNTS OS APPLlQAIJOt ■ 

ei 



xliv 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
Ni'i>i>i.i.m:\T 



April <18, 1891 



•9 

We wish to draw (he attention of Chemists to the exoellenoe of the spirit we supply far pharmaceutical purposes. We have dev.to* 
great care and attention to thii branoh and have made it a leading line. 

That our efforts In this direction have been appreciated is proved by the number ef unsolicited testimonials we have received from 
asarly every town in the country, of whloh the following is a specimen :— 

GENTLEMEN,— The Pharmaoy, Moreoambe. 

Please send 5 gall. 56 o.p. as before. I have pleasure In saying I have always found your spirit 
answer all tests, whioh is mors than I oan aay of all I have had from different places, and also to 
be Draotioally free from odour. 

Messrs. Stephen Smith & Co. Tours faithfully, JOSH. N. CUTT8, B.Bo., F.C.B. 

Ia oouaequenoe of the increase in the spirit duty onr prices will be— 

S.V.R. 56 o.p 19s. 7d. | Double Distilled, 56 o.p 19s. lid, 

CASH WITH ORDER. REDUCTIONS FOR QUANTITIES. 

SPECIALITY FOR PERFUMERY. 

Tals pure grain spirit, whloh has been thrice reotifled and filtered through charcoal, Is being largely used in making high-class Perfumes. 

Price, 20/2, 56 o.p. ; 20/8, 60 o.p. Cash with. Order. Reductions for Quantities. 
STEPHEN SMITH aST CO., BOW, LONDON, E. 



S. V, MOTH. 



JONES & COMPANY. 

COPPERFIELD ROAD 

LONDON, E. 

LARGEST MAKEBS IN THE KINGDOM. 



We are prepared to supply METHYLATED SPIRIT in 
5-gallon quantities at Lowest Prices. 

REDUCTIONS T O LARGE BUYERS. 

SAMPLES FBEE. 



9 

DISTILLERS, FOREI&IT WHE AO SPIRIT MERCHANTS, AO METHYLATORS, 

ALLHALLOWS' LA NE, & BARTHOLOMEW CLO SE, LONDON, E.C. 

Quotations for S.V.R. Methylated Spirit and Finish on application. 

FIUEST ORA-ZEsTG-IE WHTSriE ^OIR. Q^IZEnTIIN'IE!- 



JAMES 
BURROUGH, 



SiViR, 



CALE ST., CHELSEA, 8.W. 

and Methylated Spirit 

AT LOWEST PBICES. 



WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 



BEESWAX. 

W. H. B. PURE REFINED. | W. H. B. PURE WHITE, 

la 2-lb. oakes, in eases of about 130 lbf. In rotmd oakes In 2-lb. parcels, or in oblong oakes, loose 1 In oases of 64 lb» 

i -ivn In oz. oakes in 2-lb. paroels J and 56 lbs. 

" r " " " ,*J ' Plain blookB of 71 lbs. in oases of 250 lbs. 

:: I : : : IS white wax. 

„ oz. oakes In 2-lb. paroels In oases of 54 lbs. I Plain round oakeB In 2-lb. parcels In oases of 72 lbs. 

The purity of these goods is oertifled by the following eminent ohemista : S. P. Sharpless, State Assayer, Boston ; J. W . Taylor, Associate of the 
Bo.iety of Public Analysts of Eng., Montreal, P. Q. ; Edward Davies, F.O.8. and T. I. O. and 0., Royal Institution, LIVERPOOL, Eng. ; Bernard 
Dyer, D.So., F.CS, F.I.O., Momber of the 8oolety of Public AnalystB, 17 Great Tower Street, LONDON, B.C., Eng. ; Wm. T. Wanni, Analyst aad 
Assayer, San Francisco, Oal., and may be obtained ef any of the leading Wholesale Druggists in the Northern and Midland Counties. 

W* unll deliver our goods in i-cKt. ton ex quay, in any city which is the Terminus of a Stsamship Line throughout the Kingdom, without trouble or expense to the Buyr 
Our Good, may be obtained in Blngle Case lots from any of the Loading Wholesale Druggist. In the Northern and Midland Counties, and of 

W. H. BOWDLEAR & CO.. BOSTON, MASS.. U.S.A. 

Cable Address-.: OlllCB and WarehOUSe-86 CENTRAL WHARF. rHowdlsar, Boston. 

00 



Apbil 18, 1891 




WILEY'S CHEMICAL 



xlv 



FOB 



LAMENESS ITT HO 



ESSENCE 

RSES. 



Agents Wanted in every Town. Handbills, with Name and Address, supplied gratia 
BO YEARS' UNBROKEN SUCCESS. 



SOLE MAKER ft PROPRIETOR, J. ROOKLEDGE, CHEMIST, EASINGWOLD, YORK. 

TO BE HAD OF USUAL WHOLESALE HOUSES. 



WALKER, TR0KE& CO. 

WHOLESALE DRUCCISTS, 

82 CITY ROAD, 

LONDON, E.G. 




BOLE MAKERS OP 

GABRIEL & TROKE'S 
GELATINE CAPSULED 

HORSEBALLS 

Alterative, Condition, Cordis 
Cough, Diurotic, b'ever. 
Physic, and Worm Balls. 



QTJOTATIOITS & SAMPL"ES PBEE OIsT APPLICATION. 



SPERM OIL 



HUGH HIGHGATE & CO, 

PAISLEY, N.B. 

Eefinees of 

SPERM OIL & SPERMACETI. 

SAMPLES ON APPLTOATION. 



+1 PR"Vc^. 




Uted on the Rtyal Farms at Windsor, Csborne, and Sandrtngnam, and by 
the principal Stockbreeder* everywhere for nearly 60 yean. 

DAY, SON It HEWITTS 

HORSE, CATTLE, AND SHEEP MEDICINES. 




THE CHEMICAL EXTRACT. 

For assuaging pain and inflammation in all wounds, saddle galls, straini, 
braises, swelling*, and relaxed tendons in Horses. For paining after calviag 
Mt lambing, and for swollen udders and sore feet. 

2s. 6d. per Bottle ; J-dozen Box, 7s. 6d. 


THE BED PASTE BALLS and BED POWDEBS. 

For ill-conditioned Horses and Celts ; invaluable after hard hunting or 
driving. For coughs, colds, staring ooat, itching, swollen legs aad want of 
strength. The powder givem in the feed will produce fine appetite aad tost, 
7s. Od. per dozen ; S-dozen Box, 21s. 


THE BED DRENCH. 

Celebrate* for inflammatory disorders, suoh as f even, plaarlsy, foot-and- 
mouth complaints, yellows, surfeit, and red- water. Also for difficult calving 
aad lambing. Admirably adapted for cleansing and checking fsvsrisk 
lymptomi in Cows and Ewes after a bad time of parturition. 

For Sheep, 8s. 6d. ; for Cattle, 18s. per dozen Box. 


THE BLACK PHYSIC BALLS. 
Those Balls are matohless fer thoroughly cleansing the system at all lm- 
purities, and for assisting in the expulsion of Warms. Their purgativs 
action soon relieves Oostiveness of the Bawels. and ohaaks all Foverisk 
Symptoms arising from gross habit. 

Price, 8s. per dozen; Box containing 8 dozen, 23s. 


THE GASEOUS FLUID. 

Uamatahed far ••lie or gripes and debility in Horses, far eolii, obllli, 
IklTorlag fits, flux and diarrhoea in Cattle, Calves, and Bhoep. For Bwu 
waakl j after lambing and blown Cattle and Sheep, its afleoti are marvellous. 
20s. per dozen Box. 


THE BBONCHOLINE. 
The great and reliable remedy for Husk or Hoesa la Cattle, Helferi 

Calves, and Sheep. Its gaBeous odour destroys the worm or parasite la tks 
windpipe, removes the hard cough, and soothes the lungs and other argaHi 
2s. 6d. per Bottle; i-dozen Box, 7s. 6d. 


THE GA8EODYNE. 
Osod as laadaaam In nncoatrellable spasmodio pains aad vlalont bawel 
lOmplalnts. Invaluable for parturition la Mares, Cows, and Bwai. 
SB. 6d. per Bottle ; i-dozen Box, 10*. 6d. 


THE "KEY TO FAEKIEHY." 
A small wark published by us ea the general ailments af stosk, ttaelc 
treatment aad oure. 

Large Edition, in Cloth, 2s. 6d.; Small Edition, Is. 

Price 



the Stockbreeder's Medletns Chest. Na. 1 eentalns a eemplste assortment af all enr preparations far treating ; diseases of etook generally, £6 6 0 
The Stockbreeder's Medicine Chest. No. 2 is suitable for ordinary Farm use, and contains a useful selootion of the above Mertioino ' * m ° 

The Horsekeeper's Medicine Chest. No. 3 is arranged for large Horse Owners, Collieries, Ac, and contains 12 speoiany selected Mediouios o o u 
The Horsekeeper's Medicine Chest. Ne. 4 contains a Bmaller assortment, but has everything requisite fer all ordinary allmonts in Morses £ u o 



Prepared onlv bv DAY, SON & HEWITT, 22 DORSET STREET, LONDON, W. 

LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO FORBIOK BUY BRA. ^ST AND PARTICULARS OF A8BNT8 OX APPLICATION 



xlvi THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST April 18, 1891 

HIPPLEIHEIIT 

THE "STIPENDUM" STOPPER GO., LIM. 

47 LAMB'S CONDUIT STREET, LONDON, W.C., 

Manufacture the following Specialities — 

"STIPENDUM" CORK STOPPERS, in all sizes. 
"STIPENDUM" CORK-LINED CAPS, for Pomade Bottles. 
"STIPENDUM" SCREW CAPS, for Pomade Bottles. 
" STIPENDUM " OPENERS, for Stoppered Aerated Water Bottles. 

"STIPENDUM" GREASE-PROOF COVERED POTS 

IN TERRA COTTA, CHOCOLATE, AND BLACK. 

The G-rease-Proof Covered Pots have perfectly fitting lids, are practically unbreakable, and the only 

article really answering the purpose intended. 



The following Analytical Report should be noted by 
the trade: — 

London, January 5, 1891. 
" We have examined the two covered pots marked 
November 21, 1890, one containing strong nitrate ol 
mercury ointment, and the other iodine ointment, the 
object being to discover— (1) Whether the ingredients 
of which the pots are oomposed have in any way 
affected the ointments; (2) Whether the pots have 
been deteriorated by the action of the ointments. 



To be had of all Druggists' Sundriesmen. Wholes ale only of the Company. 

CHALMERS' PATENT SAMPLE AND PARCELS POST BOXT 

THE ONLY BOX 

That fulfils ALI the requirements of the POST OEFICE. 

Is fastened INSTANTLY. 
Cannot open by accident. 
Is immensely strong. 
Has no corners. 
No seams, joints, nor solder. 
Nothing to scratch or tear letters. 
Is practically air-tight :— Is used 
for Flour, Cherry Blossom, 
Sanitas, and Soap-Powders. 
Dispenses with string, bags, and 
paper. 

Saves 19 minutes out of 20. 



OYER 300,000 SOLD. 

SAVING THEIR OWN COST. 



W. B. CHALMERS, 




We hereby certify that no trace of any of the 
ingredients of the pot can be discovered in either of 
the ointments, and further that the pots themselves 
were found not to have been acted on at all ; and we 
further consider ' Stipendum ' admirably adapted for 
such pharmaceutical preparations. 

Signed, C. T. KINGZETT, F.I.O., P.C.S. 
(Ex Vice-President Society of Public Analysts >. 
B. H. HABLAKD, P.I.C. F.C.S. 
(Public Analyst). 




si" April 18, 1891- 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
M ri-i i hi \ i 



xlvii 




Ixook ! 



Wc thank our Customers for 
the patronage so kindly be* 
stowed upon us, and beg to 
remind them they will find 
us ever ready to place the 
resources of our office at their disposal. 

BOWERS BROTHERS, Printers 

89, Blackfrlars Road, and. 




NEWEST SHADES IN INKS. 
NOVELTIES IN PAPER. 
LUNG EXPERIENCE. 
ORIGINAL IDEAS. 
LATEST DESICNS. 
FAST PRESSES. 
CHEAPNESS. 



FINE 



«5.Cante"bur.r Road. Brixton S.K. mUlTlfC K>r TEfitftliarea & SDCCinieil" 



SATISFACTORY. 
APPROPRIATE. 
ATTRACTIVE. 
ARTISTIC. 
QUAINT. 

0D r ,N PRINTING 

WHAT APPEALS MORE PERSUASIVELY ? 

Rnwgrs Rmthn—- Qlorlrf' a ■ 




>nn s r 



PBIZK MEDAL, 
International 
Health Exhibition, 
1884. 



IH1 MM\W P1BHAIIII 



ENGRAVED WINDOW TABLETS 



AWARD OP MERIT 

International 
Sanitary Exhibition 
1881. 



1 1ST RUBY 



, BLUE, AMBER, AND OPAL GLASS. 

■•ad y»rti«uUri of else, lubjeot matter, and colour, when prist tor on* Tablet and upward* will ho Bint. 
Tor Proprietary Artioles, 100 8x6 Huby Tablets, £8 16a. 01. 

J. £. CORSAI, THE LGTOH SAlfD-BLiST WORKS, 80 BEATS JM ROAD, W.C. 

TO PBSVKJT FRA I' I>. IIIM* Jl) BUfilBTKM ciR^ FROM THA V1L1BRS. 




Too Tempting ! 



The Editor of this Journal has quite recently 
referred to the fact that, owing to the 
unexpected rush of applications for our 
Portrait Show Cards, the whele of the first edition had been rapidly exhausted, and some applicants 
disappointed. A second and much la'ger edition is now ready. All Chemists who atook Gny's Tonic 
are invited to apply 'or our useful and attractive advertising matter, the use of which always 
materially assists local oales. — Guy's Touic Company, 4 Ludgate Circus, London, B.C. 




SALVINE, 

THE SCIENTIFIC 

DENTIFRICE. 



OF ALL WHOLESALE 
HOUSES. 



THE LANCET. — Extract from "A^alyticai, Iucobds" reports :—" Salvine Dentifrice is 
delicately scented paste, whioh exhibits an Alkaline reaction to test paocr. It is perfectly free 
from injurious elements. From its composition it is evidently ANTACID, ASTRINGENT, 
and ANTI-PARASITIC. Salvine is contained in Collapsible Tubes, the use of whiob 
offers Obvious Advantages." 

Put up in a novel and attractive manner. Price 1/, 1/6, and 2/6. 
LIBERAL TEHMTS. 
A handsome, valuable Showcard of an e.v eedingly tasteful and high-class de- 
sign, note ready. Transparencies di d other attractive Advertising mailer. 
SAX VINE DEPOT, 3 Oxford St., LONDON, W. 



KOLA. 

KOLA WINE m 
KOLA BITTERS. 

NOW READY. 

3s. 6d. per bottle, retail. 

A liqueur-glass of either the Wine or Bitters contains the 
equivalent of 30 grains of pure Kola. 

Retail. 

Kola Chocolate 1/ 

Kolatina 1/ 

Kola Elixir 1/ 

Kola Cocoa i/g 

Kola Cordial 

Kola Lozenges 

Kola Jujubes 

Liberal Trade 



SAVARESSE'S CAPSULES. 

SANDAL WOOD; COPAIBA. 

36». and l&s. per doz. No Namen, 'Eructations, or Indigestion. 



1/li 



2/ 
2/ 
2/ 
2/6 
2/9 
2/9 
1/ 

Terms. 



3/6 each. 
3/6 ., 
3/6 „ 

5/ ,. 
4/6 „ 

4/ „ 



THOMAS CHRISTY & CO. 

25 Lime St., LONDON, E.C. 




E VAJNS, LESCBEK & WEBB, 

LONDON. 

LIVERPOOL: MONTREAL: 



[3] 



slviii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SUPPLEMENT 



April 18, 1891 



PRECIPITATED CHALK, WHITEST4N0 



PUREST. 



0FFI013 yOB BRITISH AND FOREIGN 

PATENTS AND TRADE MARKS, 

SOMERSET CHAMBERS, 151 STRAND, LONDON 

(NEXT TO SOMERSET HOUSE). 

Guide to New Patent Law and Registration gratis. 



FINEST PALE LIVER C*S>*> 

BARBADOES ALOES , 

Buyers are invited to apply for prioes to 

Am MORYOSEPH 

ST. MARY'S CHAMBERS, ST, MARY AXE, LONDON, aloe, 

ALOE The Largest Holder in England. [2] 





HYDE, NASH & CO. 

XB Philpot Ltinti, LONDON, E.C. 

SPECIALITIES — 

Arabia and Varnish Gums, Glucose, Glyeerlne, Beeswax, 
Honey, Rhubarb, Inseet Powder, Saffron, &e., fee. 

Country orderi for original packages included in public tale purchase* at fractional 

margins. 



HAND-P ICKED GUM ARABIC. 

Wholesale and Export Druggists before buying elsewhere 
should apply to 

FRED K - FINK «& CO. 

10 ft 11 MINCING LANE, LONDON, E.C. 



AN6EL WHITE TOILET POWDER 

Magical for the Complexion. Unrivalled for the Skin. 
Supersedes all others. Sole Manufacturer. 

GEOBGE G. BLACKWELL, LIVERPOOL, 

And at LONDON, PARIS, and NEW YORK. 
PRICE PER BOX, 1/-. 
Post Sample on receipt of Three Stamps. To be had of all Chemists. 



ANTEGZEMA 



REGD, 



TTte only application which rapidly and effectually cures 

ECZEMA AND ALL SKIN ERUPTIONS. 

Sold in bottles at Is. Gd. and Is. 9d. Now is the time to push it. Write 
for a show-card, bills, and terms to the trade, to 
B. O. LAYNG, CHEMIST, 93 FINSBTJB.Y PAVEMENT, E.C. 

Wholtnalt of P. HEWBERY 4- SOF. 



EXCELSIOR HERBAL SMOKING MIXTURE 

FOR ASTHMA, BRONCHITIS, SORE THROAT, &c. 

In daily use for mixing with Tobacco, also for burning in the Sick Room. A good 
article, with good Baled, neatly got up to Recall in $*oz., 1-oz., and S-oz. Packets, at 
2d. per oz. bach size packed in 1-lb. Boxes. Wholesale price. S/ per lb. Carriage 
Paid on not less than 4/ 1 A per cent, off so/ ; 1 '. per cent, off 40/. Terms—Cash 
with Order. Show and Counter Bills supplied. [S] 

W. I. LAK1H, Manuractiurer, 16 flew Bond St., LEICESTER 



JDST WHAT'S WANTED ! 

SHRINKING entirely PREVENTED. 
Lucas " E VICTOR" Soap 

Is a SPECIALITY exclusively for Washing WOOLLEN Goods 
THAT ARE LIABLE TO SHRINK. 

Neatly wrapped, full instructions, 1 Gross Boxes, 18/- Gross Tablets. 
Of all Wholesale Hou.es. and C. W. LUC A8 St CO.. ny Milton St., London, E.C. 



CHEAPEST SBltLERS IN THE MARKET. 

CHlMlfAU, BBtW A I» •XMsM. 

APPLY TO 

LUCK LEYERMORB Sm 

8 LIME STREET LONDON. E.C. 



ESTABLISHED 1S66. 



MANUFACTURERS, SANDY, BEDS 
Bale Proprietors of Sanford's Celebrated RAT POISOH", wltk- 

•ut doubt the best ever introduced. Price, 6d., Is., 2s., and 3* per box. 
Also MICE POISON; cannot be excelled. In packets, 3d., Bd^ aad 

If. each. Liberal terms to Chemists. 
Wholesale of BARCLAY & SON, 8AN8EE sr. SON. NBWBBRT * 
BON, EDWABD8 sc SON, and others. London. 



EMP. BELLADONNA. 

ON SWANSDOWN, 16 IN. WIDB. 

IT'S, per Doz. net cash. 

JOHI QUILLIAI & CO., ZZZJEZ. Manchester. 



PREPARATIONS and INSTRUMENTS. 

The genuine articles as originally introduced and prepared by 

M. W. CARMICHAEL, the American Manicurist from NewYork. 

The Trade supplied on lucrative terms by 

M. W. CARMICHAEL, 28 CONDUIT ST., LONDON, W. 

Also by S. MAW, SON & THOMPSON, or HOVENDEN. 



BARTON'S EXTERMINATOR. 

ONE SHILLING PER BOX. 




Rills and Oompletey Dries up Rats or 
Mice. Does Not Harm Dogs or Oats, 
No Smell fiom the Dead Ones. 



WOLSTENCROFT & CO., 28 LTJDGATE HILL, E.C. 

THROUGH ALL THE WHOLESALE HOUbES. 



Wholesale Buyers should write for Terms and Samples of the Cheapest and 

Best 

GTJTTA PERCHA OR METALLIC 

TOOTH STOPPINGS 

Which are Manufactured by J. J. LAKBMAN, Dentist, Lettonstonb, 
Maker of the MERMAID IMPRESSION COMPOSITION for Dentists' 
use, 3». per lb., post free. 



LEARNER'S 

PATENT FOOT-ROT COMPOSITION, 

■A. CEBTAIU OTJIRIE. 

JB1.000 was hond-fidely offered for this Patent In December, 1890. Thls-prove. 

the value of Learner's Foot-rot Composition above all others. 
Betalled in two sizes. Is. 6d. and 3s. Price to the Trade, 13s. and 26s. per doi. 
May be obtained of the Proprietor or of most London Houses. 



ORIGINAL 



MONA BOUQUET. 

Wholesale and Shipping Terms sent on application to toe Sols Manufacturers. 

GREENSILL & SON, DOUGLAS. 



JI8TABLI8HB1) 1852. 



April 18, 1S91 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

m i-i-i i ni vi 



xlix 



EXTRA FINE OIL OF CARPATHIAN CONIFERA for tho speedy 
manufacture ol Aueat Coniferous Spirits. 1 part to 9 parts of 95-uer- 
cent. best spirit. Price per 2-lb. bottle, 20s. 

EXTRA FINE OIL OF CARPATHIAN JUNIPER for Medical Pharma- 
oeuuoai purpo.es, anrt tur tho lnauutacuire of utsennpa and Liquors, 
celebrated for its excellency. Price per 2-lb. bottle, 17s. 

These are my own products (no common trade article), and I sell them 
only for oaso. 

KOLOMAWN GRABBER, Privil-eed Apothecary at LlPTO SZT.. M KLOS, HUNGARY. 




L.3VE O] 
BTHE 

CURES 



Rehevet Hot, Tender. Chafed, or Swollen Feet, softens Hard Bllste s, renders the 
reel pliant and elastic. Thousands of Testimonials. 
Fricel/1. and 2/9 par bottle. Of all Wnulesalo Homes. 
Balm of Bethesda Co., 9 Hills Place, Oxford Street, London, W. 



ROBINSON'S 

Wholesale of 

BANGER & SON, 
Oxford Street, 
and 

MAY & ROBERTS, 

Olerkenwell Road, 

LONDON. 



THE BEST IN THE WORLD. 



FAMILY 



PILLS. 



TUT THEM 1 1 



(VXN. AURANT., P.B.) 

Specially brewed for Quinine Wine. Does not deposit, will keep good in any climate. 
In casks, 13 gallons to 140 gallons i small casks 3«. 9d. per gallon, carriage allowed 
if paid within three months. In wine-bottles (not less than 3 doz.). at 9i. per doz., 
bottles included. Casks and cases extra, and returnable. 
Sample four stamps. Special quotation* to large buyer*. 

DURRANT & CO., Railway St., HERTFORD. 



INDELIBLE MARKING INK. 

NO HEAT REQUIRED. 

May be obtained direct from the Makers 

M. & E. MARX, 3 Newington Crescent, LONDON, S.E. 

This Marking Ink Is the Best Ink introduced to the Trade, and is sold Retail at 

6d. and 1/- per bottle ; also 1/6, 2 6, 3/6, 6/-, ; 6. and 10/6. 
Also CRIMSON MARKING INK at the above prices. Send for Sample Order. 



INDIARUBBER STAMPS 

For all purposes and in all styles. 

Self -Inking Stamps, at Illustration, from 2/ each. 
Chemists' Prescription and Dating Stamps 
of all kinds, Brass Seals for Wax, Stencils, 

Dies, &e. Price and Pattern Sheets post free. 

J. BERKLEY, 8 LIVERY ST,, BIRMINGHAM, 




TO LET. 



YAN HARGANS 

KOLA WINE. 

AN INVIGORATING TONIC, AND ASSISTS DIGESTION, 

Messrs. Barclay & Sons, Newbery, and all Wholesale 
. Houses. 



NATALI & CO., 

SHOP FITTERS & SHOW-CASE MAKERS, 

184 Aldepsgrate Street, LONDON. 

SECOND-HAND SHOP FITTINGS BOUGHT, SOLD 
and EXCHANGED. 





Supplied ia Original Bottles ready for 
Patient's use (stamped), to retail at 4/8 
3 each ; also in 1-lb. Battles for Dispensing, 
b j the Sole Manufacturers : — 

Fletoher, Fletoher 

A Stevenson, 
21 Mincing Lane, 
London E.C. 



BLAIR'S 



GOUT & RHEUMATIC PILLS 

OURS GOUT. CURE RHEUMATISM. CURE SCIATICA. 
CURE LUMBAGO. CURE NEURALGIA. 



The 15 xer a elating Fain is quickly relieved, and cured in a few days, by these 
Celebrated Fiili, well known as the Great Remedy for the above Complaint*. 

No restraint of diet during u*e. 
Sold by all Chemists at U. Urf. and 1*. 9d, per box. 



CHAS. GREEN & CO., 



Chambers, LONDON, E.C 



GBEENS HYPODERMIC AND OPHTHALMIC SOLUTIONS 

Lancet-." EXCELLENT PREPARATIONS." 

GREEN'S SUBLIMATE (HgCl 2 ) TABLETS (Acidified). 

For Antiseptic use in Surgical operations, Ac. 
No. 1, 1 in 3,000 i No, !, 1 in 1,600, in 1 pint of water. 

LIQ, SENN/E LEGUMINUM, a harmless laxative for children & pregnant women 

LISTS ON APPLICATION. 



TRADE MARK, 



" SILVERY WHITE GDTTA PERCHA ENAMEL " 
TOOTH STOPPING 

P. A. STEVENS, Surgeon-Dentist, 

73 MAN AFIELD RuAD, N.W., 
BOLE PROPRIETOR AND MANUFACTURER. 




Registered— No. 3746. 



Special Terms to Wholesale Houses for Sheet or Sticks stamped with their own name. 
A sample box of 3<i. sticks sent post free for U stamps. Price list and samples free. 



I 



S. SAINSBURY'S 



From English Lavender 
Viewers, and moat oholot 
and delioato sotnts. 

170 * 177 BTBAND. LONDON. 

Established 1839. 
Wholesale and SKxpptnc term* on application. 



Lavender 
Water. 



STVDALMAS 1 LEISEST ER 




In ONE WEEK three curious uses were reported for which 

"THE LEICESTER" IMPROVED ADHESIVE PLASTER, 

On fine Flesh-coloured Cambric, 

is found tho best after trjlnt? other makes (In tho first enso, nearly every known 
platter) A well-known actor said ho had tho good fortuno to meet with it in the houto, 
of England and had inquired for it wherever ho went since. It is the only plaster ho cau 
And to answer for Axing fnl'clmr. .to. A chemist in the North wrotenndsnidahidy vio- 
linist WOBld have nothing else : she uses it tfl bake a pnd to protect her finger*. A c homtst 
in Yorkshire 1ms a customrr who uses plustnr to ko»p his eyes open, nnd nothing win noiu 
the lids up so well U " T„e LeloOstSlT" Improved Adhesive rinsler on Kino Flesh coloured 
l' timbre. Sunje "is in till parts art frequently commending >'. The sale rapidly increases- 



1 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 



Apkil 18, 1891 




POR OUS PLAIST ERS. 

STRENGTHENING, BELLADONNA, 

AND CAPSICUM. 

\ ■ 

Manufactured t>y 

WILLIAM MATHER. 

Chemists are respectfully informed that by 
purchasing one gross of any of the above 
their own Names and Addresses may be 
printed upon the wrapper and back cloth 

of each plaister. 



PRICE, INCLUSIVE OF PRINTING, PER GROSS. 

Subject to usual Discount, as per Price List. 





MANUFACTORY:- 



DYER STR EET, HEM E, MANCHESTER. 

London Wholesale and Export Agents :— Messrs. MACE & HALDANE, 94 Milton Street, LONDON, E.C. 

SB 



April 18, 1891 THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 
ivpniiuiii 



42 Highest Awards over all Competitors throughout the World. 

SEABURT & JOHNSON, 



ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS OF 



PHARMACOPEIA!. AND SURGICAL PLASTERS 

IN RUBBER COMBINATION, 

ANTISEPTIC DRESSINGS AND ABSORBENTS, &c. 



Manufacturers of PLASTERS of m 1 Description. 

Adhesive, Breast, Bunion, Corn, Court, Dental, Dermatologioal, Homoeopathic, Isinglass, Kid, Vedicinal, Mustard, Pharmacopoeia! and 
# Surgical, <tc. In Rubber Combination, plain or porous, and spread on any mxteriat required. 

Manufacturers of ABSORBENT BANDAGES, COTTONS, GAUZES, LINT, WOOLS of every description. 

' Antiseptic, Plain and Medicated, Benzoated, Borate:!, Carbolated, Cooaine, Corrosive Sublimate, Eucalyptol, Hydronaphthol, Iodized, mt\ 
aaj Iodoform, Morphia, Naptnalin*, Salicylated, Styptic, Tannin, Thymol, 4x. Q 

H 



M 



In all our preparations the percentage of medication is based upon the weight of the finished product. 
]flauilfactnrers of ©IJLED ftlXK, Superior Quality. Yellow, Green, Protective. 
OILED MUSLIN, OILED PAPER, &c, for Hospital Purposes. 



H Antiseptic Pellets. Adhesive Strips. Ear Blisters. 



P 



Corrosive Sublimate, in Hydronaphthol, Dn. Penny's Adjustable (12 in a box), Right or Left, 

bottles, 9/, 16/,30/doz. bots. in bottles, 8/ & 16/ doz. 24/ per doz. 2/ per doz. 



<j Darby's Dental Capsicum Plasters. 

(In boxes of 80 Plasters, 80/ per dozen.) 
From the British Journal of Dental Science, January 15th, 1889.— These Plasters have been before the profession for some time, M 
and those who have used them are unanimous in their encomiums. They are, probably, the safest counter- irritants in the hands 
of the profession. 

Court Plasters, in 50 Varieties, from 40/ dozen to 4/ gross. 

Mead's Rubber Adhesive Plaster. 

In 5-yard rolls, 13 inches wide, 5/ each. In 1-yard rolls, 7 inches wide, 14/ per dozen. 

10- Yard Spools — ( Width A I I * 2 1 L faoh f 

I Price 12/ 14/ 16/ 20/ 24/ 28 32/ per dozen. 

5 ,, ,, „ 9/ 10/ 12/ 15/ 18/ 21/ 24/ „ rjj 

S. »v J. Snrg-eon's Rubber Adhesive Plaster H 

J Has almost entirely supplanted the old form of Adhesive, by reason of its superiority in all essential qualities. PLAIN or POROUS. 
^ In 5-yard rolls, 7 inches wide, 6 6 each. In 1-yard rolls, 7 inches wide, 17/ per dozen. 

10- Yard Spools — { Width J_ 1 1* 2 8J 3_ inches 

Ki I Price 18/ 24/ 30/ 40/ 50/ 60/ per dozen. 



M 
- 

Q 



M 

< 



Belladonna Breast Plasters, 6 inches, 4/6 ; 7 inches, 6/; 8 inches, 7/6 per dozen. 
Kid Plasters, loDg shape, 6/, 6/, and 7/ per dozen. 
Camphorated Blister Plaster, 27/6 per dozen yards. 



Ill 

0 



Belladonna Plasters— Porous and Plain, 5 x 7£ inches, 54/ per gross ; 7 x 12 inches, 10/ per dozen. 

1-yard rolls, 7 inches wide, 27/8 per doz. 5-yard rolls, 5 inches wide, 102/ : 14/ each, 7 inoheswide, 128/ per doz. M 
„ „ on red fait, 86/perdoz. 5 x 7J inches, 6/ per doz. 7 x 12 inches, 12/ per doz. On sivansdown, 36/ per doz. 



2 
0 



r5 Streng-theiiing- Plasters— Porous, 5x7£ inches, 30/ per gross; 7x12 inches, 72/ per gross. 7* 

M 1-yard rolls, 5 inches wide. 14/ ; 7 inches wide, 97/6 dozen yards. 5-yard rolls, 5 inches wide, 86/ ; 7 inches wide, 96/ per dozen. H 

. On red felt, „ „ 86/ „ .. .• » 1H/6; „ „ l4/eaoh; if* 

7H 5x7i inches, 80/ gross ; 7x12 Inches, 144/ gross. jb> 

^ SUBJECT TO DISCOUNT. NEW PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. ^ 

Ph Supplies may be obtained through any of the Wholesale Houses by ordering SEABURY'S. Q 

Q OR FROM THE SOLE MANUFA0TUUBR3 — ^ 

SEABURY & JOHNSON, M tOS^ NEW YORK. 

46 J^WIN STREET, LONDON, E.C. 



87 



iii 



THE CHEMIST AND DRUGGIST 

SI'PPLEnillVT 



April 18, 1891 



"VINOLIA" URGES LEGISLATION 

"POISONS IN SOAPS." 



THOUGH Soap is an article of every-day use, and has been for years upon years, the public is perhaps as ignorant 
upon the subject of soap as upon any. It is hardly possible for one unacquainted with the subject to have any 
adequate conception of the enormous extent to which soaps are adulterated, contaminated and sophisticated. While a 
good soap should be made with fat and an alkali like soda or potash, resin is largely used to replace part of the fat in 
many, such as primrose, yellow and transparent soaps, because of its comparative cheapness. When resin and soda are 
boiled together, the result is a mass somewhat allied in appearance to soft soap, and if this resin compound be incorpor- 
ated with ordinary soap made from fat, the whole will melt away quickly in warm water, and lather more freely than soap 
made with fat alone. The result is that resin soaps are more wattef u), and are not specially desirable for the skin. The 
writer remarked to a man in a soap faotory the other day, who was shovelling his cwt. of resin into the boiling soip below, 
" What makes you put so much of it in ? " The reply was, " Becausa we could not afford to use fat instead." 

It is not to be supposed that the fats used for soaps are always good ones. Sometimes the oily mass floating upon 
the surface of sewers, or upon the surface of waters into which sewers empty, and fats oftentimes whose origin is not 
known are employed simply and solely because of their cheapness. This is no strange doctrine, but an actual fact. 
Fats are used in making soaps that should, never be employed on a human skin. Many of them are putrid, rancid, and 
irritating, and pregnant with germs of disease. Supposing a skin is inflamed, irritated, or abraded, are these products 
to be recommended for it? If it is tender or delicate, what will be the action of these products upon it? It has been 
alleged that no small proportion of skin-disease has been caused by soaps — soaps even which have been largely advertised. 
The fact of the matter is that the public should really be guarded from such injurious products. We are told that 
many soaps are reeking with poisons. No one who is familiar with the subject denies that most of the common toilet 
soaps in the market are alkaline. Some of them are heavily laden with carbonate of soda, Glauber's salt, sand, French 
chalk and other matters to fill them up. Some of the white curd soaps contain as much as 40 per cent, of water, and 
are extremely alkaline. Is the public to pay for soap and get such stuffs palmed off upon it ? But let us see the spirit in 
which the -rank and file of soapmakers meet any suggestions regulating the manufacture and supply of soap. At a 
recent meeting of the Balloon Society the Editor of the Hospital Gazette read a paper on soaps. Prominent soapmakers 
were present, and when the subjoined resolution was submitted they opposed it, and with such effect that it was only 
carried by a majority of one. The ordinary reader asks himself why a motion of this kind was rejected by the manufac- 
turers. It reads as follows : — 

" That, in the opinion of this Meeting, Legislation'pn the lines of the Adulteration 
of Foods Act is desirable in the interests of the public health, with, a view to 2>revent 
the sales of adulterated, injurious, and fraudulent comjwunds now sold under the 
name of Soap." 

In other words, the soapmakers are in favour of a continuation of the present state of things, whereby a manufacture 1 
may incorporate into his soap poisons, silicate of soda, sand, 30 per cent, of sugar, 20 per cent, of water, resin instead of 
fat, and anything else he likes out of a long list of adventitious matters. This opposition reminds one of the attitude 
assumed by the makers of oleo- margarine. These latter were not in favour of any legislative restrictions or supervision. 
In other words, they wanted to be allowed to sell oleo-margarine in place of butter without letting the .public .know what 
■it was buying. As a matter of fact, if a soap contain a large quantity of water or sugar, or other admixture, it should not 
be sold as pure soap, and the fact that it contains such admixture should be stated on the box, circular, or tablet, the same 
as butterine should not be sold for butter, nor watered milk, nor coffee and chicory, nor sugar and sand for the 
genuine article. 

Not content with the foregoing resolution, the soapmakers must needs introduce an amendment, and here it is : — 

" That, in view of the extraordinary development of soap manufacture in this country 
during the last ten years, this Meeting hesitates to place any Government restrictions 
upon the industry, feeling confident that soaps injurious to the skin are easily detected 
., and rejected by the public." . • .. 

The amendment amounts to simply this, that the public is to have no criterion of what is a good or bad soap, except by 
trying it. If people perceive that it is injurious to the shin, they can discard it ; but then the injury will have been done. 
What satisfaction is it to the man suffering with skin-disease, or to the mother whose child is afllicted with some 
affection of the integument, that he or she has found out that such a soap is impure and not fit to use ? If soaps contain 
poisons, irritants, and obnoxious ingredients, why should not the public be protected against them ? This is a question 
for the soapmakers to answer. But not all inferior soaps inflame the skin ; for example, those containing sugar, resin, sand, 
a lot of water, &c, do not create intense inflammation, so that people are not suspicious of them, and may continue to pay 
for soap and get soap and sand, or soap and sugar, or soap and water, in place of the genuine product. If one asks 
-for and pays for soap, why should he be supplied in part witn sugar, or sand, or water ? 

Turning to " Vinolia" Soap, we can say it is made from edible fats which might be used in miking the finest pastry. 
It contains no free alkali whatever, no resin is substituted for part of the fat, it is not treated with methylated 
spirits, and contains no sugar ; moreover, it is free from silicate of soda, sand, and all those adventitious matters which are 
sometimes used to sophisticate soaps for the profit of the manufacturer. It embodies all the advances achieved in recent 
years in the manufacture of soaps. It lathers freely, wears well, and is satisfactory to wash with. We do not recommend 
it as a balm or a magic ; we do not say that it will keep the skin for ever young, but we claim that for the toilet, 
nursery, "and bath it is the acme of all that has been done in soaps. It has been tried by the most scientific, critical, and 
fastidious clientele in the world, and has uniformly stood the test. To compare it with some of the products cilled Toilet 
Soaps sold in the English market is to exhibit an absolute ignorance of the subject, or else self-interest and an egregious 
presumption. We give an analysis. 

BLOXDEAU it CIE. 

98